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Glass House

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NEWS
December 12, 2003
ADEMOCRATIC Palm Beach County state attorney obtained a warrant and confiscated Rush Limbaugh's medical records. Rush took to the airwaves and cried foul, claiming he is a victim of an invasion of privacy that no citizen should endure. It's ironic that the man who attacked Bill Clinton on a daily basis while high on a pharmaceutical opiate now finds himself the subject of what could be an overly zealous and unfair investigation? Mr. Limbaugh's indignant rantings and partisan finger pointing are rife with hypocrisy.
NEWS
September 22, 1992
The use of Dan Quayle to lead the "draft-dodger" charge against Bill Clinton bespeaks a wishfully low estimation of the American voter. How long did the White House think it would take before folks would scratch their heads and start asking, "Didn't that Quayle fella pull a few strings himself to get out of Vietnam?" Well, the Vice President did use family connections to secure a safe haven in the Indiana National Guard. Old news. Mostly hashed over in Mr. Quayle's bumpy start as Mr. Bush's running-mate.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2012 | Howard Gensler
People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones. But what if people create a show for ABC called "The Glass House" and it's surprisingly like a show called "Big Brother" on CBS? Can CBS throw stones? Can the network sue? Attorneys for CBS have sent ABC executives a letter warning that "The Glass House" is "strikingly" similar to "Big Brother. " CBS also notes that ABC may be benefiting from the fact that 18 former "Big Brother" staffers and executives are now working on the planned ABC show.
LIVING
February 11, 2005 | By Denise Cowie INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eve Thyrum thought it might be nice to live in a house made completely of glass. Not only would she be able to have plants growing indoors no matter the season, but the transparent walls would let her feel like she was outdoors all the time. And Thyrum loves to be outside. She heads out the minute she gets up in the morning, if the weather obliges, and in summer eats inside only when she absolutely must. But a totally glass house? It didn't seem feasible at the time. Now, the idea doesn't seem so far-fetched.
LIVING
November 4, 1994 | By Lucinda Fleeson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nestled in the swale of a hill, the newly restored glass-house fernery at the Morris Arboretum looks a bit like the faceted prow of Captain Nemo's Nautilus submarine. There is something fantastic about its curvilinear glass walls that seems both space-age vessel and antiquated garden folly. Jules Verne, the author of Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, and John Morris, the creator of the fernery, were contemporaries in the Victorian age, both dedicated to scientific inquiry.
NEWS
September 26, 2006
What did people expect from a member of the Hitler Youth? Pope Benedict XVI exercised very bad judgment in saying what he did, even if it was based in fact. (World literature is an enlightening subject to study.) I am, however, amused that the Turks (of all people!) are outraged at Benedict's comments, considering what these people did to the Armenians and Greeks in Northern Turkey not 100 years ago (and the way they took Albania by force back in the 1500s). If I were them, I'd closely guard my glass house.
NEWS
May 28, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Psychologist Alice Miller once recorded a girl's innermost fear, that she was as transparent as a glass house and that her domineering mother could see all her thoughts. Thus, the girl said, she had to bury her thoughts in the basement where her mother could not see them. And where, needless to say, they remained hidden from the girl herself. Zelly and Me, writer/director Tina Rathborne's feature debut, is a story as fragile and tragic as Miller's case history. In this film, set in 1958, the girl is Phoebe, an 8-year-old orphan raised in privilege on her domineering grandmama Co-Co's colonial estate.
NEWS
January 27, 2005 | By Thomas Hine and Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITICS
Philip Cortelyou Johnson, the critic-turned-architect who designed and lived in the world's most famous glass house, and who was among architecture's foremost popularizers, died yesterday at his celebrated New Canaan, Conn., estate. He was 98. Mr. Johnson was at the center of architectural fashion and controversy for more than six decades - as curator, as architect, and finally simply as Philip, the packager of trends, orchestrator of careers, and celebrity commentator on all things architectural.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Jason R. Nathan, 84, a government official who oversaw the construction of public housing projects throughout the Northeastern United States during the 1960s, but also went out of his way to fund Society Hill's colonial-style lamp posts and brick sidewalks, died Tuesday, Dec. 17, of heart failure at a Haverford nursing home. Mr. Nathan, who spent most of his adult life in Philadelphia, was running the mid-Atlantic office of the Department of Housing and Urban Development during the period when cities across the country were clear-cutting old neighborhoods and replacing them with cookie-cutter housing towers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Party like a rock star. That's the premise of The Real Cancun, a schlockumentary that details a V.I.P. spring break of tropical excess in the boozy resort town south of the border. Yet somehow the movie (which could easily have been titled Dude, Where's My Underwear?) managed to scrape up 16 college-age kids who are so callow they make this fantasy lifestyle look unattractive. They're crude representatives of the Jerry Springer generation. The film is an accelerated version of MTV's perennial reality series, The Real World, only with more drinking and more sex. The results, however, are the same: In a remarkably short period of time, the worm in the tequila bottle has turned and the party people (or as the credits refer to them: "cast members")
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NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Jason R. Nathan, 84, a government official who oversaw the construction of public housing projects throughout the Northeastern United States during the 1960s, but also went out of his way to fund Society Hill's colonial-style lamp posts and brick sidewalks, died Tuesday, Dec. 17, of heart failure at a Haverford nursing home. Mr. Nathan, who spent most of his adult life in Philadelphia, was running the mid-Atlantic office of the Department of Housing and Urban Development during the period when cities across the country were clear-cutting old neighborhoods and replacing them with cookie-cutter housing towers.
NEWS
August 17, 2012
TO CHRISTINE Flowers: I read your column often. I usually agree with you. This time I have a problem. When all this with the church and Sandusky investigations first started, I felt sorry for Monsignor Lynn and Joe Paterno. I looked at them as scapegoats. As both investigations continued, I learned that all they did was try to protect the church and the school. I then turned against them. What they all did had nothing to do with protecting our children. I hate to think about the many people in both venues who have known this was going on for many years.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2012 | Howard Gensler
People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones. But what if people create a show for ABC called "The Glass House" and it's surprisingly like a show called "Big Brother" on CBS? Can CBS throw stones? Can the network sue? Attorneys for CBS have sent ABC executives a letter warning that "The Glass House" is "strikingly" similar to "Big Brother. " CBS also notes that ABC may be benefiting from the fact that 18 former "Big Brother" staffers and executives are now working on the planned ABC show.
NEWS
June 26, 2011 | By Michael Smerconish
Chris Christie should run for president now, assuming he aspires to ever hold that office. The GOP field for 2012 remains wide open, while there is no telling how a 2016 (or later) field could shape up. The economy is the focal point this cycle, so Christie's reputation as a budget-cutting governor suits the times. And popularity in politics is often fleeting, particularly for a Republican from Democrat-heavy New Jersey. Dan Quayle was once a Hoosier hero after being elected the youngest U.S. senator in Indiana history.
NEWS
April 22, 2008 | DEBORAH LEAVY
PEOPLE who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones. That's what I think when I listen to the debate over whether President Bush should attend the opening ceremonies of the summer Olympics in Beijing. Some human-rights activists are urging foreign leaders to boycott the ceremony to protest China's human-rights record, which includes oppression of the people of Tibet, and of dissidents, journalists and others. By focusing attention on Beijing, the Olympic Games provide an opportunity for the world's nations to publicly condemn Chinese policies.
NEWS
January 30, 2007 | Reviewed by Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Skylight Confessions By Alice Hoffman Little, Brown. 256 pp. $24.99. As she demonstrates with her latest novel, Skylight Confessions, Alice Hoffman remains a literary sorceress par excellence. She has spun yet another haunting, fairy tale-like fiction for grown-ups. But if the author of The Probable Future, Practical Magic and Turtle Moon relies less on outright manifestations of enchantment in Skylight than in other works, Hoffman's characters are attentive still to myth, talismans and the fantastic.
NEWS
September 26, 2006
What did people expect from a member of the Hitler Youth? Pope Benedict XVI exercised very bad judgment in saying what he did, even if it was based in fact. (World literature is an enlightening subject to study.) I am, however, amused that the Turks (of all people!) are outraged at Benedict's comments, considering what these people did to the Armenians and Greeks in Northern Turkey not 100 years ago (and the way they took Albania by force back in the 1500s). If I were them, I'd closely guard my glass house.
NEWS
March 30, 2006 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
It was hailed; it was reviled. It was opened with great fanfare; it was closed with a whimper. Now the old Liberty Bell pavilion, likened in its heyday to both a gas-station convenience hut and a glittering jewel box, is being obliterated from Independence Mall. But, in a most American twist, the pavilion will not vanish from the collective consciousness. It will be reborn as an internuncio of American freedom. All thanks to an 86-year-old Alaskan businessman with a shock of white hair and a big idea.
NEWS
April 8, 2005 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Donnell Welch's basement apartment was wrecked in last weekend's flood, but the family's hamster emerged unscathed. As the waters rose, La La in her little glass house bobbed from room to room - as she did during the last flood in September - without even getting wet. "That's a keeper," Welch, 35, said with a hint of amazement. "It survived two floods. " That was it for the good news. Welch's wife, Sakeenah, 26, said it had cost $30,000 to recover from last year's flood.
LIVING
February 11, 2005 | By Denise Cowie INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eve Thyrum thought it might be nice to live in a house made completely of glass. Not only would she be able to have plants growing indoors no matter the season, but the transparent walls would let her feel like she was outdoors all the time. And Thyrum loves to be outside. She heads out the minute she gets up in the morning, if the weather obliges, and in summer eats inside only when she absolutely must. But a totally glass house? It didn't seem feasible at the time. Now, the idea doesn't seem so far-fetched.
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