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NEWS
May 11, 2009 | By George Spaeth FOR THE INQUIRER
Most Wednesday afternoons are painful. That is when I work with resident physicians in the glaucoma clinic of Wills Eye caring for patients, sharing experiences I have had during the last 40 years. Because many patients who come to the clinic cannot see well enough to make it there on their own - glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world and even in the United States - they often are brought here by friends or relatives, sometimes even by a grandchild.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine a bathtub with the faucet running all the time. When the drainpipe gets clogged, the water backs up in the tub. When the drain completely closes, the water collects until it overflows the tub. The analogy is imperfect, but that's sort of what happens in glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness. Poor drainage causes fluid buildup in the eye. Except that the eyeball, unlike a tub, is a closed structure, so fluid pressure builds up, harming the sensitive optic nerve.
SPORTS
December 24, 2000 | By Bob Brookover, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a beautiful day; summer had just turned to autumn, the sun shined brightly, and the sky was a cloudless blue. Only one heart-wrenching thought crossed Melissa Gomes' mind as her husband navigated the family car through the city streets after a visit to the Scheie Eye Institute. "Such a pretty day, and I was just hoping that Miles would be able to see a day like that one," Melissa said. Wayne Gomes vividly remembers the painful emotions of that sunny afternoon. "We cried a lot that day," the 27-year-old Phillies relief pitcher said.
SPORTS
May 11, 2001 | by Dana Pennett O'Neil Daily News Sports Writer
The other day, Miles Gomes' parents found him under the bed. Testing his newly found crawling skills and eager to explore the world, Miles skittered right underneath where his mommy and daddy sleep. He's at that curious stage, a typical 8-month-old who grabs for everything and anything, and who squeals in delight at life's daily discoveries. "He's a miracle," Melissa Gomes said, expressing the same sentiment felt by every parent who gazes upon his or her personal bundle of joy. Except there is a deeper meaning in the case of Miles Gomes.
NEWS
February 11, 2000 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Wayne H. Dunn had a very personal reason for becoming an eye doctor. Growing up in Jamaica, he saw two of his grandparents suffer progressive sight loss from cataracts and glaucoma. "They became virtually blind," said Dunn, 37, who now lives in Wallingford, Delaware County. "I initially got interested in the field because of what happened to them. " Dunn had other personal incentives for studying ophthalmology. Both his parents suffered from diabetes, an illness that often causes eye disease as arteries deteriorate from its effects, he said in an interview this week.
SPORTS
April 18, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Minnesota Twins outfielder Kirby Puckett yesterday underwent the first of what may be a series of operations to stave off the effects of glaucoma. Bert Glaser performed the operation at the Retina Institute of Maryland, which is part of the St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. Puckett, a 10-time all-star who has not played this season, first complained of poor vision during spring training. It turned out that blood vessels feeding the retina in his right eye became partially blocked because of increased pressure caused by glaucoma.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | By Mark Stroh, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Celestine White has something in common with baseball great Ted Williams, the last man to hit above .400 for a season. Like Williams in his prime, White has outstanding 20-10 eyesight. This was news to the 56-year-old, who yesterday received a free eye exam in a makeshift clinic in the lobby of the Life Center of Eastern Delaware County, a homeless shelter wedged along Upper Darby's border with Philadelphia. "I don't remember the last time I had my eyes checked," White said.
NEWS
January 24, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAMPS WRITER
The U.S. Postal Service will issue a 29-cent Black Heritage Series commemorative Friday in Chicago for Percy Lavon Julian, an Alabama-born chemist who helped discover drugs for the relief of glaucoma and arthritis. Julian (1899-1975) was the son of schoolteachers, though his father later worked as a railway mail clerk. He graduated from the State Normal School for Negroes in his home town of Montgomery, Ala., and enrolled at DePauw University in Greencastle, Ind., living in the attic of a fraternity house that hired him as a waiter.
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lucille Washington is 79 now, and her husband, Edward, is 90. They live in a rowhouse in Southwest Philadelphia. She has glaucoma; they both have arthritis. They worked all their lives - she as a nurse, he as a court clerk - but they weren't in unions and don't have private health plans, and today, they are among an estimated 15 million Medicare recipients who don't have any prescription-drug coverage. All their prescription expenses are out of pocket. And like most retirees, they are on fixed incomes: part Social Security, part pension.
NEWS
November 15, 1987 | By Laurie T. Conrad, Special to The Inquirer
The supermarkets are shocking. Hanna Rabey is visiting the United States from her native Russia for the first time, and the 80-year-old grandmother has been amazed by the variety and bounty of foods displayed in local stores, according to her son, Alex Rabey of Hatboro. "The most shocking, for sure, is the supermarket. Absolutely shocking - she didn't believe it," Rabey said when asked about his mother's impression of the United States. Hanna Rabey came from Moscow at the end of September after waiting 14 years for permission to visit her son, daughter-in-law and granddaughter who had left the Soviet Union in the mid-1970s.
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NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine a bathtub with the faucet running all the time. When the drainpipe gets clogged, the water backs up in the tub. When the drain completely closes, the water collects until it overflows the tub. The analogy is imperfect, but that's sort of what happens in glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness. Poor drainage causes fluid buildup in the eye. Except that the eyeball, unlike a tub, is a closed structure, so fluid pressure builds up, harming the sensitive optic nerve.
NEWS
September 22, 2012
Wills Eye Institute and the Glaucoma Service Foundation will offer free glaucoma screenings Saturday as part of the sixth annual CARES (Committed to Awareness through Research, Education, and Support) Conference. The event, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the eighth floor of Wills Eye, 840 Walnut St., will also include eye pressure checks and discussions on signs, symptoms, and risk factors of glaucoma, which can cause irreversible blindness if not detected. Breakfast and lunch will be served.
NEWS
December 18, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Fifteen years ago, when Nani and John Chong had an opening for an optometrist at their Center City optical boutique, they wanted Dr. B. Herbert Behrmann had a following. Patients raved about his calm instructions and corny jokes. After refracting thousands of glasses and contacts, Behrmann's old-school training and precision awed younger admirers. Dr. B was 75. He'd survived World War II and managed care, outlived two wives, and witnessed seismic changes in his profession, but could see no reason to stop working.
NEWS
May 11, 2009 | By George Spaeth FOR THE INQUIRER
Most Wednesday afternoons are painful. That is when I work with resident physicians in the glaucoma clinic of Wills Eye caring for patients, sharing experiences I have had during the last 40 years. Because many patients who come to the clinic cannot see well enough to make it there on their own - glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world and even in the United States - they often are brought here by friends or relatives, sometimes even by a grandchild.
NEWS
January 22, 2007
GLAUCOMA IS A disease that causes millions of people to lose their vision or go blind unnecessarily every year. January is Glaucoma Awareness Month - a time to be focused on this serious disease. Glaucoma damages the optic nerve, which connects your eye to your brain. Once the optic nerve cells have died, vision cannot be restored. If anyone in your family has been diagnosed with glaucoma, or if you are Hispanic or African-American, you are at a higher risk for developing the disease.
SPORTS
March 7, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
KIRBY PUCKETT, the bubbly, barrel-shaped Hall of Famer who carried the Minnesota Twins to two World Series titles before his career was cut short by glaucoma, died yesterday after a stroke. He was 45. Puckett died at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix, spokeswoman Kimberly Lodge said. He had been in intensive care since having surgery at another hospital following his stroke Sunday. Puckett carried the Twins to World Series titles in 1987 and 1991 before his career was cut short by glaucoma.
NEWS
January 26, 2006
JANUARY is Glaucoma Awareness Month - a time to focus on a serious disease that can make you go blind, but doesn't have to! Glaucoma is a group of conditions that damage tiny nerve fibers in the back of eye because of pressure levels. Some people go blind with average pressure, and some don't get any damage even though pressure is much higher than average. With such diverse symptoms, it is easy for glaucoma to go overlooked. In fact, 50 percent of those who suffer from glaucoma are unaware they have it. Yet glaucoma is the third leading cause of blindness in white Americans, the second leading cause in African-Americans and the No. 1 cause in Hispanic Americans.
NEWS
June 14, 2002 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Drops that are already available by prescription to lower pressure within the eye can delay and perhaps even prevent the onset of glaucoma in people who are at risk, a new study has found. Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness in the United States, but treatment often does not begin until some damage has been done. The disease is caused by elevated pressure in the eye and is treated with dozens of medications that lower pressure. Those same drugs were found to be successful as a preventive measure.
SPORTS
May 11, 2001 | by Dana Pennett O'Neil Daily News Sports Writer
The other day, Miles Gomes' parents found him under the bed. Testing his newly found crawling skills and eager to explore the world, Miles skittered right underneath where his mommy and daddy sleep. He's at that curious stage, a typical 8-month-old who grabs for everything and anything, and who squeals in delight at life's daily discoveries. "He's a miracle," Melissa Gomes said, expressing the same sentiment felt by every parent who gazes upon his or her personal bundle of joy. Except there is a deeper meaning in the case of Miles Gomes.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | By Mark Stroh, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Celestine White has something in common with baseball great Ted Williams, the last man to hit above .400 for a season. Like Williams in his prime, White has outstanding 20-10 eyesight. This was news to the 56-year-old, who yesterday received a free eye exam in a makeshift clinic in the lobby of the Life Center of Eastern Delaware County, a homeless shelter wedged along Upper Darby's border with Philadelphia. "I don't remember the last time I had my eyes checked," White said.
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