CollectionsGlaxosmithkline
IN THE NEWS

Glaxosmithkline

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 24, 2011 | By David Sell and Jeff Shields
INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS GlaxoSmithKline chief executive Andrew Witty surprised Mayor Nutter on Wednesday by announcing a $5 million donation to the city, with no strings attached beyond the general hope that it would help young people in Philadelphia. "We can make an impact on the next generation," Witty said at a City Hall gathering held under the banner of the British American Business Council of Greater Philadelphia. Witty and other GSK executives joined Nutter to discuss the British pharmaceutical company's decision to move from Center City to the Navy Yard.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deirdre Connelly, the North American president of GlaxoSmithKline, helped break ground and plant trees Thursday as the global pharmaceutical giant put down a new corporate footprint in Philadelphia at the Navy Yard. But once the new building rises from the dirt, Connelly said, she won't have a big corner office with a window of nearby mothballed Navy ships, Lincoln Financial Field, or the Delaware River. "We have a lot of history in the city of Philadelphia that dates to 1830," she told the assembled corporate executives and city leaders, including Mayor Nutter, before moving on to the future and how the company would operate in its new space.
NEWS
July 4, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the largest financial penalty of its kind in the United States, drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges and pay federal and state governments $3 billion to settle allegations related to inappropriate marketing of drugs, withholding of safety information, and failure to report accurate prices. At a Washington news conference, Deputy Attorney General James M. Cole said the settlement was "unprecedented in size and scope" and "underscores our robust commitment to protecting the American people from the scourge of health-care fraud.
NEWS
February 18, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The news that GlaxoSmithKline is moving the last remnants of its Philadelphia workforce from Center City to a low-rise office building at the Navy Yard appears to follow the contours of an all-too-familiar narrative: Once again, downtown is losing a major corporation to the tug of wide-open spaces. Except this time, those wide-open spaces are located in the city, not the suburbs. Two decades ago, when the 1,200-acre Navy Yard was repurposed as a corporate park, it was seen as an urban alternative to Chester County's Great Valley office corridor.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2008 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So how big a blow is it to lose GlaxoSmithKline's corporate headquarters in Philadelphia? Is it just prestige and bragging rights? Will some of the 4,500 workers here lose jobs? The London pharmaceutical giant is consolidating what had been two U.S. headquarters - one in Philadelphia - into one at Research Triangle Park, N.C. Will the effect be fewer high-salaried science and research jobs? Could the region lose civic leadership and charitable giving enjoyed when Glaxo had physical headquarters here?
BUSINESS
August 30, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the Ebola epidemic growing in West Africa, drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline and the National Institutes of Health said Thursday that they would begin next week the first human trials of a potential vaccine that might help prevent the spread of the virus, which has killed more than 1,500 people. Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, a division of NIH, said the epidemic was now "uncontrolled" and requires an "all-hands-on-deck" response.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2008 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline's marketing and clinical research of big-selling anti-anxiety drug Paxil - which some say leads to higher rates of suicidal behavior - is attracting new attention in Washington. Sen. Charles Grassley (R., Iowa) this month asked the Food and Drug Administration to consider whether Glaxo withheld information from regulators. Grassley's request was triggered by an unsealed study that claims Glaxo should have known in 1989 that Paxil could lead to higher suicide risk.
NEWS
March 7, 2011
A story in Sunday's business section about GlaxoSmithKline's move to the Navy Yard incorrectly identified the Philadelphia Sport and Social Club, which organizes sports leagues at the yard. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357) at The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia 19101, or e-mail dsullivan@phillynews.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Staff Writer
Iroko Pharmaceuticals Inc., a small developer of pain drugs based at the Navy Yard, will try to raise $145 million through an initial public offering, according to a registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Iroko, begun by several former GlaxoSmithKline executives in 2007, generated 2012 sales of $6.7 million from two medicines, Aldomet and Indocin. The company filed a new-drug application with the Food and Drug Administration seeking approval for Zorvolex to treat acute pain in February.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2008 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it comes to picking new drugs, big pharmaceutical companies behave like parents asked to judge their own offspring, said Andrew Witty, the new chief executive officer of GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. "No one wants to say their own child is ugly," Witty said this week. With hundreds of millions of dollars at stake to develop a drug, he said he thought the industry could use a little Simon Cowell-style straight talk. One of Witty's solutions: Create an investment board of outsiders - venture capitalists and executives from biotechnology companies - to review GlaxoSmithKline's prospective drugs with its own scientists and marketers.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 18, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
She loves Philadelphia. "Come on, this city is gorgeous!" She'd even like to buy some real estate here. "Anyone have some ideas?" But she wanted to know who that guy was standing atop City Hall. "Billy Penn?" she asked incredulously. "What'd he do? Was he like poet laureate, or something, of Philadelphia?" That was Diane Keaton, 68, one of a star-studded handful of keynote speakers Thursday at the 11th annual Pennsylvania Conference for Women, where more than 7,000 women and a few men attended the one-day lollapalooza-scale event.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the Ebola epidemic growing in West Africa, drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline and the National Institutes of Health said Thursday that they would begin next week the first human trials of a potential vaccine that might help prevent the spread of the virus, which has killed more than 1,500 people. Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, a division of NIH, said the epidemic was now "uncontrolled" and requires an "all-hands-on-deck" response.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shifting needs of players in the pharmaceutical industry came together Monday afternoon when GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. announced a licensing deal with California-based Codexis Inc., which produces enzymes and a related process that allows drugmakers to manufacture medicines less expensively and in a more environmentally friendly manner. London-based GSK, which has operations in and around Philadelphia, will pay Codexis $6 million up front and $19 million more after the technology is successfully transferred.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Coppertone and Claritin, iconic health-care products for preventing sunburn and treating allergies, will get a new corporate parent under a deal announced Tuesday in which Merck & Co. will sell its over-the-counter division to Bayer AG for $14.2 billion. New Jersey-based Merck got 70 percent of its consumer division revenue from U.S. sales, but German-based Bayer expects to make more from sales elsewhere on the globe. This is the latest deal in a wave of takeovers and trades by pharmaceutical industry giants, which are scrambling to reorganize to better balance investor demands for higher profits with patient and payer demands for better products at lower prices.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Staff Writer
Iroko Pharmaceuticals Inc., a small developer of pain drugs based at the Navy Yard, will try to raise $145 million through an initial public offering, according to a registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Iroko, begun by several former GlaxoSmithKline executives in 2007, generated 2012 sales of $6.7 million from two medicines, Aldomet and Indocin. The company filed a new-drug application with the Food and Drug Administration seeking approval for Zorvolex to treat acute pain in February.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The controversial diabetes drug Avandia, made by GlaxoSmithKline, might not cause as many heart problems as was thought, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said in a report released Monday. The report was prepared in advance of an unusual advisory-committee hearing scheduled this week to reexamine a clinical trial called Record, done by Glaxo in the mid-2000s to support continued approval of the medication. The FDA is in something of a bind with this drug. It approved the medication in 1999, but then was criticized after a 2007 study found cardiovascular problems in those who used it. The agency did not ban the drug, but in 2007 added restrictions to the official label on how it could be prescribed.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vaccines are a big part of GlaxoSmithKline's pharmaceutical business, which is why, the company said Wednesday, it paid $325 million in cash for Okairos A.G., a Swiss firm whose work with monkey viruses offers a potential new way to protect people from disease. The Basel-based Okairos is a private company spun off from Merck in 2007. Since then, it has been supported by several venture-capital firms. In Okairos, Glaxo gets vaccines in early-phase trials, but also a proprietary process that might help its research efforts.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
A local unit of drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline has a central role in a $200 million public-private project announced Wednesday to develop antibiotics against biological terrorism and treat drug-resistant infections in health-care settings around the world. The U.S. government will pay Glaxo $40 million in the first 18 months, and, if the project is on track, $160 million more over five years. Glaxo will contribute more of its own money to the project. Glaxo is one of the few big pharmaceutical companies that still works on antibiotics.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
After reporting lower quarterly profits, drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline said Wednesday that it would reorganize its pharmaceutical divisions, with the possibility of someday selling older, "established" brands that it rarely promotes. Glaxo is based in London, but has about 1,300 employees in Philadelphia's Navy Yard and more in other facilities in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Also, with United Kingdom authorities criticizing Glaxo for trying to delay the introduction of generic competitors nearly 10 years ago and the U.S. Supreme Court weighing a case, chief executive officer Andrew Witty defended the business practice.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
PRINCETON - Merck & Co.'s chief executive officer, Ken Frazier, says the drugmaker's facility in West Point, Montgomery County, is in no danger of being closed now. Merck is among the many pharmaceutical companies that have announced in recent months plans to close or consolidate facilities in hopes of squeezing more efficiency out of their operations. Some of those decisions involved laying off employees. Is West Point safe? "Yes," Frazier said Thursday evening after speaking about Merck's worldwide vaccine programs at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|