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Glaxosmithkline

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NEWS
March 24, 2011 | By David Sell and Jeff Shields
INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS GlaxoSmithKline chief executive Andrew Witty surprised Mayor Nutter on Wednesday by announcing a $5 million donation to the city, with no strings attached beyond the general hope that it would help young people in Philadelphia. "We can make an impact on the next generation," Witty said at a City Hall gathering held under the banner of the British American Business Council of Greater Philadelphia. Witty and other GSK executives joined Nutter to discuss the British pharmaceutical company's decision to move from Center City to the Navy Yard.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deirdre Connelly, the North American president of GlaxoSmithKline, helped break ground and plant trees Thursday as the global pharmaceutical giant put down a new corporate footprint in Philadelphia at the Navy Yard. But once the new building rises from the dirt, Connelly said, she won't have a big corner office with a window of nearby mothballed Navy ships, Lincoln Financial Field, or the Delaware River. "We have a lot of history in the city of Philadelphia that dates to 1830," she told the assembled corporate executives and city leaders, including Mayor Nutter, before moving on to the future and how the company would operate in its new space.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
GlaxoSmithKline is teaming up with Verily Life Sciences L.L.C. in the San Francisco Bay area to form a new company to develop "bioelectronic" medicines that use electrical signals in the body to treat chronic diseases. Verily, formerly Google Life Sciences and a wholly owned subsidiary of Alphabet Inc., said Monday that the collaboration presents a "possible new way" of providing therapy to patients. Bioelectronic medicine is a relatively new scientific field that uses miniature implantable devices in the body to modify electrical signals that pass along nerves, including irregular or altered impulses that occur in many illnesses.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
GlaxoSmithKline plc and Novartis AG said Friday that they had struck a deal for Novartis to pay GSK at least $300 million, and perhaps more than $1 billion, for the remaining rights to the drug ofatumumab. The drug already is approved for use in treating some cancers and is sold by Novartis under the name Arzerra. Novartis now will have the rights for any use of ofatumumab approved by regulators, most importantly multiple sclerosis. GSK gets $300 million when the deal is closed, $200 million if Novartis starts a phase III clinical study of ofatumumab in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis, and contingent payments of up to $534 million if other development milestones are achieved.
NEWS
July 4, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the largest financial penalty of its kind in the United States, drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges and pay federal and state governments $3 billion to settle allegations related to inappropriate marketing of drugs, withholding of safety information, and failure to report accurate prices. At a Washington news conference, Deputy Attorney General James M. Cole said the settlement was "unprecedented in size and scope" and "underscores our robust commitment to protecting the American people from the scourge of health-care fraud.
NEWS
February 18, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The news that GlaxoSmithKline is moving the last remnants of its Philadelphia workforce from Center City to a low-rise office building at the Navy Yard appears to follow the contours of an all-too-familiar narrative: Once again, downtown is losing a major corporation to the tug of wide-open spaces. Except this time, those wide-open spaces are located in the city, not the suburbs. Two decades ago, when the 1,200-acre Navy Yard was repurposed as a corporate park, it was seen as an urban alternative to Chester County's Great Valley office corridor.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2008 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So how big a blow is it to lose GlaxoSmithKline's corporate headquarters in Philadelphia? Is it just prestige and bragging rights? Will some of the 4,500 workers here lose jobs? The London pharmaceutical giant is consolidating what had been two U.S. headquarters - one in Philadelphia - into one at Research Triangle Park, N.C. Will the effect be fewer high-salaried science and research jobs? Could the region lose civic leadership and charitable giving enjoyed when Glaxo had physical headquarters here?
BUSINESS
July 9, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Drug maker GlaxoSmithKline said Thursday that it will collaborate with the National Institutes of Health to evaluate a new vaccine technology to protect against Zika virus. GSK said it has concluded feasibility assessments and is preparing research studies with the NIH. The technology, known as SAM (self-amplifying mRNA), is designed to produce an immune response but does not use a live or killed virus, as do many conventional vaccines. The GSK vaccine delivers nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can "self-amplify" - and reproduce thousands of times.
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Alan J. Dalby, 79, formerly of Devon, who rose from a lab assistant to lead the pharmaceutical firm of Smith Kline & French, died Monday, Aug. 1, at his home in London. He and his family lived in Philadelphia in the 1960s and in the suburbs from 1972 to 1986, as Mr. Dalby scaled the career ladder at the company, which later became known as GlaxoSmithKline and GSK. At the height of his success, he was executive vice president of SmithKline Corp. and president of Smith Kline & French Pharmaceuticals.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline is partnering with a San Diego research institute to study brain function and treatments to potentially reverse or slow down neurodegeneration. The Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in La Jolla and GlaxoSmithKline, which has operations in the Philadelphia area, will create a center on Sanford Burnham's campus with the goal of finding new medicines for diseases such as Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. Under a three-year agreement, GSK will fund a research laboratory where scientists and staff from Sanford Burnham will work with GSK neuroscientists.
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NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Alan J. Dalby, 79, formerly of Devon, who rose from a lab assistant to lead the pharmaceutical firm of Smith Kline & French, died Monday, Aug. 1, at his home in London. He and his family lived in Philadelphia in the 1960s and in the suburbs from 1972 to 1986, as Mr. Dalby scaled the career ladder at the company, which later became known as GlaxoSmithKline and GSK. At the height of his success, he was executive vice president of SmithKline Corp. and president of Smith Kline & French Pharmaceuticals.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
GlaxoSmithKline is teaming up with Verily Life Sciences L.L.C. in the San Francisco Bay area to form a new company to develop "bioelectronic" medicines that use electrical signals in the body to treat chronic diseases. Verily, formerly Google Life Sciences and a wholly owned subsidiary of Alphabet Inc., said Monday that the collaboration presents a "possible new way" of providing therapy to patients. Bioelectronic medicine is a relatively new scientific field that uses miniature implantable devices in the body to modify electrical signals that pass along nerves, including irregular or altered impulses that occur in many illnesses.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Drug maker GlaxoSmithKline said Thursday that it will collaborate with the National Institutes of Health to evaluate a new vaccine technology to protect against Zika virus. GSK said it has concluded feasibility assessments and is preparing research studies with the NIH. The technology, known as SAM (self-amplifying mRNA), is designed to produce an immune response but does not use a live or killed virus, as do many conventional vaccines. The GSK vaccine delivers nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can "self-amplify" - and reproduce thousands of times.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline is partnering with a San Diego research institute to study brain function and treatments to potentially reverse or slow down neurodegeneration. The Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in La Jolla and GlaxoSmithKline, which has operations in the Philadelphia area, will create a center on Sanford Burnham's campus with the goal of finding new medicines for diseases such as Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. Under a three-year agreement, GSK will fund a research laboratory where scientists and staff from Sanford Burnham will work with GSK neuroscientists.
NEWS
February 14, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline, with major U.S. operations in the Philadelphia area, was fined $54.5 million, or 37.6 million pounds, Friday by a British competition authority for allegedly preventing less-expensive generic versions of its anti-depressant drug Seroxat from entering the market. GlaxoSmithKline has commercial operations primarily for vaccines and pharmaceuticals at the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia, and research and development sites in Upper Merion and Upper Providence, Montgomery County.
NEWS
September 17, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tampa, Fla.-based data-center developer vXchnge has opened a 70,000-square-foot facility in a former pharmaceutical plant near Center City. The data center at GlaxoSmithKline's former manufacturing building at 1500 Spring Garden St. is vXchnge's 15th such facility nationwide, the company said in a statement Tuesday. Data firm Sungard Availability Services, headquartered in Wayne with locations throughout North America, India and Europe, also maintains a facility in the building.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
GlaxoSmithKline plc and Novartis AG said Friday that they had struck a deal for Novartis to pay GSK at least $300 million, and perhaps more than $1 billion, for the remaining rights to the drug ofatumumab. The drug already is approved for use in treating some cancers and is sold by Novartis under the name Arzerra. Novartis now will have the rights for any use of ofatumumab approved by regulators, most importantly multiple sclerosis. GSK gets $300 million when the deal is closed, $200 million if Novartis starts a phase III clinical study of ofatumumab in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis, and contingent payments of up to $534 million if other development milestones are achieved.
NEWS
October 18, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
She loves Philadelphia. "Come on, this city is gorgeous!" She'd even like to buy some real estate here. "Anyone have some ideas?" But she wanted to know who that guy was standing atop City Hall. "Billy Penn?" she asked incredulously. "What'd he do? Was he like poet laureate, or something, of Philadelphia?" That was Diane Keaton, 68, one of a star-studded handful of keynote speakers Thursday at the 11th annual Pennsylvania Conference for Women, where more than 7,000 women and a few men attended the one-day lollapalooza-scale event.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the Ebola epidemic growing in West Africa, drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline and the National Institutes of Health said Thursday that they would begin next week the first human trials of a potential vaccine that might help prevent the spread of the virus, which has killed more than 1,500 people. Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, a division of NIH, said the epidemic was now "uncontrolled" and requires an "all-hands-on-deck" response.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shifting needs of players in the pharmaceutical industry came together Monday afternoon when GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. announced a licensing deal with California-based Codexis Inc., which produces enzymes and a related process that allows drugmakers to manufacture medicines less expensively and in a more environmentally friendly manner. London-based GSK, which has operations in and around Philadelphia, will pay Codexis $6 million up front and $19 million more after the technology is successfully transferred.
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