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NEWS
May 10, 1988 | By JOHN M. BAER, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal prosecutor who has sent two Philadelphia judges to jail wants to become a Philadelphia judge himself. Assistant U.S. Attorney Gary S. Glazer is on a short list recommended to Gov. Casey for one of 13 judicial vacancies, most created by the Roofers Union scandal. Glazer confirmed in a Daily News interview that he has been before Casey's judicial nominating commission. He said he is interested in being picked and would be "delighted to serve. " He said he hasn't heard whether he is being seriously considered.
NEWS
January 23, 1988 | By TONI LOCY, Daily News Staff Writer
To hear Assistant U.S. Attorney Gary S. Glazer tell it, suspended Common Pleas Judge Kenneth S. Harris has a lot in common with Henry Ford of automobile fame. "Kenneth Harris was a genuine entrepreneur of the judicial system," Glazer told a federal jury yesterday in his closing argument. "Kenneth Harris was to judicial corruption what Henry Ford was to the production of the automobile. He (Harris) was not hearing cases, he was fixing them for profit. " Glazer also accused Harris of practicing "cesspool justice.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Traffic Court Judge Willie Singletary, suspended for allegedly showing a phone-camera photo of his genitals to an employee, has submitted a resignation. Common Pleas Court Judge Gary S. Glazer, the acting administrative judge of Traffic Court, said Singletary submitted his resignation by iPhone. Glazer said, however, that under state law, a judge must resign directly to the governor, so Singletary would have to resubmit his resignation to Gov. Corbett. Glazer declined to provide the contents of Singletary's resignation e-mail, received this week.
NEWS
March 12, 2012 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Proposals for reshaping Philadelphia Traffic Court may include a requirement that judges have legal experience. None of the court's current judges has a law degree. The dramatic change is an idea being deliberated by Common Pleas Court Judge Gary S. Glazer, appointed in December to shake up Traffic Court operations. In an interview, Glazer, a former federal prosecutor, called the court's current structure "uniquely Philadelphian. " Glazer was made administrative judge of Traffic Court in December after state Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille said judges had "institutionalized" the practice of out-of-court, or ex parte, communications.
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
COMMON PLEAS Judge Gary Glazer told the state House Judiciary Committee on Friday that he was surprised at the "seemingly insatiable demand" for ticket-fixing at Traffic Court, even after the state Supreme Court put him in charge in December, when it was clear the FBI was investigating the practice. On one occasion, a ward leader who called Glazer's office asked for a message to be passed to a Traffic Court judge about a friend with a ticket. "How does that help me?" the ward leader later asked when told the message had gone to Glazer.
NEWS
November 3, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The 16-year-old former Bartram High School student came to court yesterday expecting to be jailed for shooting and wounding the school's vice principal last year. But Eric E. Coxen caught a break. Common Pleas Judge Gary S. Glazer, noting that Coxen had no prior record, and expressing concern that jailing the teen-ager with hardened criminals could corrupt him for life, imposed a sentence of 11 1/2 to 23 months of house arrest, plus 16 years' probation. Coxen was ordered to perform 2,000 hours of community service and undergo drug and psychiatric counseling.
NEWS
August 22, 1995 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Michael Marinari limped to the bar of the court, a wounded hero. Last March 15, Marinari chased two robbers who took cash and sneakers from the sporting goods store he managed in the Gallery II and caught one of them. The captured bandit shouted to his accomplice, "Shoot him!" And Marinari, 26, wound up with a bullet in the right thigh. Yesterday, William Miller, 22, of the Richard Allen Homes housing project, pleaded guilty before Common Pleas Judge Gary S. Glazer to robbery, aggravated assault and conspiracy charges.
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The owners of a Port Richmond demolition company hired by the city to demolish abandoned properties dug their own hole by burying "dirty fill" at various sites, said the judge. "You have committed a crime that is a danger to this city," said Common Pleas Judge Gary S. Glazer yesterday to William R. Hawthorne Sr., 55, of Churchville, Bucks County, and his brother David E., of Pennsauken, N.J. Glazer sentenced both men to 18 to 36 months in prison and fined each $8,000, plus $206 court costs.
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | by Dave Racher Daily News Staff Writer
The 16-year-old boy convicted of shooting and wounding his Bartram High School vice principal had a good time during his house-arrest sentence, a prosecutor said. Eric E. Coxen was smoking pot with visiting friends, said Assistant District Attorney Steven Collier. As for court-ordered community service, well, Coxen said he would do it only if he were paid, Collier said. Coxen's attitude cost him his freedom. Common Pleas Judge Gary S. Glazer revoked Coxen's original sentence of 11 1/2 to 23 months at home, and ordered him committed to a juvenile facility for 18 to 36 months, plus 10 years' probation.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia Traffic Court Judge Willie Singletary, suspended for allegedly showing a camera phone photo of his genitals to an employee, has submitted his resignation. Court of Common Pleas Judge Gary S. Glazer, the acting administrative judge of Traffic Court, said Singletary submitted his resignation by iPhone. However, Glazer said that under state law a judge must resign directly to the governor, which means Singletary will have to resubmit his resignation to Gov. Corbett for it to take effect.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Mark Fazlollah and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
Cornell Edens was the proverbial innocent. On a Sunday evening in December 2011, he was walking down the sidewalk in Germantown, on his way to visit his elderly mother. Edens worked occasionally, but mainly lived on disability checks. As his sister put it, he had been "always behind in school. " He was 59 years old and mentally challenged. Archie McLean was anything but innocent. He had served time for robbery and gun convictions. That night, Dec. 18, McLean was driving drunk on Price Street when his Toyota minivan jumped the sidewalk and rolled onto Edens, crushing him to death.
NEWS
June 23, 2013 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
ALLENTOWN - The last unindicted judge of Philadelphia's late and not-lamented Traffic Court insisted Friday that she had never fixed tickets. Christine Solomon took the stand in a hearing here on the state Supreme Court's move to suspend her without pay, and sought to rebut a complaint that she had lied to corruption investigators. She tried to turn the tables on the investigators, testifying that they had broken a promise to keep interviews confidential, and had bullied and threatened her. At one point, Solomon testified, Common Pleas Court Judge Gary S. Glazer, assigned to overhaul the troubled Traffic Court, had hollered at her, "Take this as a threat or a promise, I will get you!"
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Amy Worden and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - Like the Packard automobile popular at the time of its founding, the end of the road has arrived for Philadelphia Traffic Court. Gov. Corbett on Wednesday signed legislation that abolishes the scandal-plagued court and immediately transfers its duties to Municipal Court. "Traffic Court has been the subject of calls for elimination for decades, and it finally reached such heights of corruption there really was no other choice," said Erik Arneson, spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Dominic Pileggi (R., Delaware)
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
COMMON PLEAS Judge Gary Glazer told the state House Judiciary Committee on Friday that he was surprised at the "seemingly insatiable demand" for ticket-fixing at Traffic Court, even after the state Supreme Court put him in charge in December, when it was clear the FBI was investigating the practice. On one occasion, a ward leader who called Glazer's office asked for a message to be passed to a Traffic Court judge about a friend with a ticket. "How does that help me?" the ward leader later asked when told the message had gone to Glazer.
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Common Pleas Court Judge Gary S. Glazer, the reformer brought in to drive out corruption at Philadelphia Traffic Court, was joking - sort of. Glazer predicted that it would take just an hour for the culture of corruption in the court to come roaring back once he left his post as supervising judge. An aide said Glazer had it all wrong. His prediction: 15 minutes. Glazer told the story Friday as he appeared before a legislative panel considering a plan to abolish Traffic Court and replace its elected judges with hearing examiners who are part of Municipal Court.
NEWS
February 3, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three judges indicted in the Philadelphia Traffic Court ticket-fixing scandal were suspended indefinitely without pay Friday by the state Supreme Court. Traffic Court Judges Michael Lowry and Michael J. Sullivan and District Judge Mark A. Bruno of Chester County were relieved of their duties pending further action by the high court. Bruno occasionally heard Traffic Court cases. Common Pleas Court Judge Gary S. Glazer, administrative judge of Traffic Court, had immediately removed the judges from hearing cases after they were indicted Thursday.
NEWS
October 22, 2012
Since Richard Glazer became chairman of a revamped city Ethics Board in 2006, the agency has been impossible for the city's Democratic power structure to ignore. Enforcing the city's campaign-finance laws, the agency has collected fines from political action committees controlled by leading political figures, including former Gov. Ed Rendell, Democratic Party Chairman Bob Brady, and close to half of City Council. It spent more than a year tracing the source of scurrilous fliers in the 2007 mayoral campaign, going into court several times, before IBEW Local 98, the electricians union run by John "Johnny Doc" Dougherty, admitted responsibility.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter has decided to end Richard Glazer's six-year run as chairman of the city Board of Ethics, despite widespread respect for Glazer's work building an effective, independent agency and giving teeth to the city's campaign-contribution limits. Glazer, 69, a lawyer who also heads the Pennsylvania Innocence Project at Temple University's law school, provided the first public word of the mayor's decision at the Ethics Board's monthly meeting Wednesday. "I'm immensely proud of what we've accomplished," Glazer said.
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