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NEWS
July 8, 1993 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was a celebration of family and friendship Sunday as hundreds of Glenside residents gathered at the Harry Renninger Recreation Area for the community's 89th annual Independence Day Celebration. The day began with morning activities for children at the recreation area, followed by a parade in the early evening. Rene Mealey, who has headed the holiday celebration for two years, said the event cost $15,000 to stage. The money was raised through donations. "(Glenside) is the longest continuously running parade in the state," said Mealey, who has lived in Glenside for 24 years.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
Kimber Anne Cunnane, 27, died Sunday as a result of injuries suffered in a traffic accident that day outside Columbia, S.C. A former resident of Glenside, Miss Cunnane had been a saleswoman for the Sears Budget Rent-A-Car Co. in Columbia. She was a 1980 graduate of Bishop McDevitt High School and attended Montgomery County Community College. She had spent the last three years at Hilton Head Island, S.C., and planned to marry Daniel Santomaro of Columbia early next year. According to family members, Miss Cunnane was a free spirit who liked the outdoors, especially the beach, and the people of Columbia.
NEWS
November 19, 1990 | By Sam Wood, Special to The Inquirer
In the realm of pop music, the Cocteau Twins are the proverbial mystery wrapped in an enigma. For the last eight years, the Twins have constructed a shimmering architecture of feverish dreams. Against that swirling backdrop, vocalist Elizabeth Fraser has sung in a language that resembles none spoken on Earth. Saturday night, the Cocteau Twins brought their netherworld music to the Keswick Theater in Glenside. For 90 minutes the three Twins - plus two additional guitarists - spun their hypnotic and ethereal creations for an entranced sellout audience.
NEWS
April 22, 1991 | By Kevin L. Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shortly before the end of the Klezmer Conservatory Band's second hourlong set at the Keswick Theater in Glenside yesterday afternoon, bandleader Hankus Netsky thanked the capacity crowd for coming to the celebration. His choice of words was appropriate. When played the way it should be, klezmer, a melange of Eastern European Jewish music and American jazz and popular genres, is a joyous music. And when the 12-piece aggregation broke into a Russian sher medley, members of the audience slowly but surely filled the aisles of the theater with a laughing, percolating, mobile quasi-conga line.
NEWS
August 12, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The federal government has hit a Glenside-based construction company with $77,500 in fines for allegedly exposing its employees to extremely dangerous levels of lead during reconstruction work on railway bridges in Philadelphia. In issuing a "willful" citation, one of its most stringent penalities, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) indicated its belief that Muratone Company Inc. knew or should have known about the hazard, which could cause death or serious injury.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2000 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Each of the four artists featured in "A Closer Look," guest-curated for the Beaver College Art Gallery by Alex Baker, rewards a viewer for making the trip to Glenside. Matthew Wine's creepy-looking sculptures, made from multicolored foam carpet-backing, transform a utilitarian domestic material into an intimation of alien life. The small green-and-yellow sculpture that appears to have attached itself to a window is especially unsettling. Susan Arthur's staged photographs - candy chicks, snowmen and such placed in outdoor settings - express something of the same surreal oddness.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
At night, the North Hills commuter train station on Mount Carmel Avenue near North Hills Avenue in Abington is lit up like Veterans Stadium on a night that the Phillies are at home. It wasn't always that way, though. Before the station was revamped, you couldn't see your hand in front of your face. One night back in those dark days, a man hid in one of the shacks that shielded commuters from the rain. A police officer patrolling the area failed to see him. When the officer left, the man broke into a car and used jumper cables in an attempt to steal it. But local residents on Townwatch patrol spotted him and alerted police.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Judith Joy Shore, 67, a Zionist volunteer, died Sunday at her home in Glenside. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mrs. Shore graduated from the Midwood High School and attended New York University. The longtime member of Hadassah served as president of the Henrietta Szold Group and of its Philadelphia chapter, and was still active with the organization at the time of her death. She volunteered for 10 years on the Service Committee of the National Board of Hadassah. She was a member of the commission that created the Sister Cities Plaza Celebration at 18th Street and the Parkway, marking the U.S. Bicentennial.
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Smith family of painters - four people regarded a century ago as the glamorous kind of artists travelers might write home about - is featured in a large revival show of the clan's work at the Berman Museum. Before this year is over, seven museum exhibits will have been held across the state honoring this Glenside family, including displays at Chestnut Hill's Woodmere Art Museum (now through May 17), the Independence Seaport Museum, and various road shows. These four once-popular artists worked in ways that transcended some of the aesthetic trends of their day, and they still don't fit easily into mainstream pigeonholes.
NEWS
May 7, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
"We are born from the darkness," read the sign out front at St. Luke the Evangelist Church on Saturday, a reference to the Catholic teachings of original sin and salvation. But a day after the Glenside parish's popular pastor, Msgr. Michael Flood, was cleared to return to his post, the message could have described the mood of his waiting congregants as well. "It's like we've been under this dark cloud," said John Ginty, 48, a lifelong parishioner. "I can't wait to see him again and give him a big hug. " Flood, 72, was one of three priests reinstated Friday after archdiocesan officials cleared them of allegations of sexual abuse or misconduct with minors.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 10, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lee Davis, 93, a longtime barber in Philadelphia, died Sunday, May 4, of a heart attack at a nursing facility in Pleasanton, Calif. Mr. Davis had moved to the West Coast a decade ago to be near his son. In failing health, he died during a family party anticipating his 94th birthday on May 12. "He held on until we got there," said daughter Geraldine Andrews-Savage. The son of sharecroppers, Mr. Davis was raised in Augusta, Ga., during the Jim Crow era. In June 1943, he was drafted into a segregated unit of the Army.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IT WAS ABOUT 4 p.m. on Monday when Andre Washington Sr. saw his son for the last time. The two chatted in Washington's kitchen in Jenkintown as they waited for their dinner to cook. Then, the man told his pop that he was going to take a walk to his girlfriend's house. A few hours later, Washington opened his front door and came face to face with Abington Township Police officers. "I just hit the floor," Washington said. "It was like getting stabbed in the back. " They told him his son, who inherited his name, was dead, struck by a SEPTA Regional Rail train as he was walking on the tracks of the West Trenton Line near Noble Station, off Old York Road near Baeder, not far from that same kitchen.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Still struggling in the postrecession, local flower shops aren't just competing with supermarkets, discounters, and do-it-yourselfers. They're fighting to survive as a growing number of online middlemen known as "order-gatherers" sweep into the marketplace and take orders local florists used to receive. Sounds like an old story: Brick-and-mortar stores battle booming Internet competitors. But florists say these third-party retailers are using deceptive advertising and failing to give consumers a fair deal.
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert F. Eisele, 88, of Churchville, a former Philadelphia and New York advertising executive, died Saturday, March 22, of lymphoma at St. Mary Medical Center, Langhorne. Mr. Eisele worked in industrial advertising for many years, starting with Disston Saw Works in Philadelphia. After a brief period spent as a copywriter for the Evening Bulletin and the ad agency Erwin, Wasey, Ruthrauff & Ryan, he became an ad manager for several Philadelphia industrial corporations. Later, Mr. Eisele commuted from his home in Glenside to FMC Corp., a chemical pump maker with New York offices.
NEWS
February 20, 2014
J AMES E. INNES II, 58, of Glenside, is CEO of CarrierClass Green Infrastructure, a Plymouth Meeting firm that designs, sells and installs off-grid, outdoor solar-charging stations, primarily for commercial customers. The firm has built Cafe ConnecTable for outdoor solar mobile-device charging. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for ConnecTables? A: The firm was founded in 2009 to develop commercial and institutional solar PV [photovoltaic] products. We raised some money from Ian Jones, who's my partner.
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles W. Carr, 82, a resident of Sea Isle City, N.J., since the late 1990s who operated the Irish Shop in Keswick Village in Glenside, died of cancer Thursday, Feb. 13, at his home. Born in Bryn Mawr, Mr. Carr graduated from West Catholic High School for Boys in 1949 and was a member of the Army Corps of Engineers during the Korean War. "He operated a rock-crushing machine to make roads," his brother James said. Using the GI Bill, Mr. Carr earned a bachelor's degree in finance at Villanova University.
NEWS
January 3, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WILLIAM MARTIN had a way of strolling into a room, cool and confident, master of all he surveyed. He would usually have a wisecrack to break the ice. Some of those he greeted might not have been amused, but you couldn't help but be charmed by this happy guy. "He had the ability to make you crack a smile even if you preferred otherwise," his family said. Because of his cheerful, outgoing manner, Bill was a natural as a greeter at New Covenant Baptist Church, where he made parishioners feel that they had come to the right place for spiritual sustenance.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Terry Traylor was said to have the physique of Superman and the heart of God. With those gifts, Traylor lifted up everyone around him, from southern Texas to his church in Montgomery County. That was the way family members and friends remembered Traylor at the Keswick Theatre in Glenside on Monday, four days after the church leader died from a massive heart attack. Traylor, 64, was the senior pastor of New Life Presbyterian Church in Glenside and a leader in the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA)
NEWS
December 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward D. Davis III, 83, of Wyncote, a Philadelphia schoolteacher and administrator who later ran a tea room in Glenside, died Tuesday, Nov. 26, of cancer at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mr. Davis grew up in South Philadelphia, where he attended Barrett Elementary School, and graduated in 1949 from Central High School. He enrolled at Lincoln University, but left before graduating to join the Marine Corps. Following his honorable discharge, he matriculated at Cheyney State Teachers' College, now Cheyney University.
NEWS
December 9, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheltenham police are investigating an abduction, carjacking, and beating that left a Glenside man hospitalized Saturday and his five assailants and his car missing. The victim, whom authorities did not identify, arrived home in the 400 block of West Waverly Road shortly before 3 a.m. and was approached by five men who assaulted him and threw him into the backseat of his vehicle, Cheltenham police said. The assailants drove off with him in the car, a 2006 white Infiniti with Pennsylvania license plate HTZ-7098.
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