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NEWS
July 8, 1993 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was a celebration of family and friendship Sunday as hundreds of Glenside residents gathered at the Harry Renninger Recreation Area for the community's 89th annual Independence Day Celebration. The day began with morning activities for children at the recreation area, followed by a parade in the early evening. Rene Mealey, who has headed the holiday celebration for two years, said the event cost $15,000 to stage. The money was raised through donations. "(Glenside) is the longest continuously running parade in the state," said Mealey, who has lived in Glenside for 24 years.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
Kimber Anne Cunnane, 27, died Sunday as a result of injuries suffered in a traffic accident that day outside Columbia, S.C. A former resident of Glenside, Miss Cunnane had been a saleswoman for the Sears Budget Rent-A-Car Co. in Columbia. She was a 1980 graduate of Bishop McDevitt High School and attended Montgomery County Community College. She had spent the last three years at Hilton Head Island, S.C., and planned to marry Daniel Santomaro of Columbia early next year. According to family members, Miss Cunnane was a free spirit who liked the outdoors, especially the beach, and the people of Columbia.
NEWS
November 19, 1990 | By Sam Wood, Special to The Inquirer
In the realm of pop music, the Cocteau Twins are the proverbial mystery wrapped in an enigma. For the last eight years, the Twins have constructed a shimmering architecture of feverish dreams. Against that swirling backdrop, vocalist Elizabeth Fraser has sung in a language that resembles none spoken on Earth. Saturday night, the Cocteau Twins brought their netherworld music to the Keswick Theater in Glenside. For 90 minutes the three Twins - plus two additional guitarists - spun their hypnotic and ethereal creations for an entranced sellout audience.
NEWS
April 22, 1991 | By Kevin L. Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shortly before the end of the Klezmer Conservatory Band's second hourlong set at the Keswick Theater in Glenside yesterday afternoon, bandleader Hankus Netsky thanked the capacity crowd for coming to the celebration. His choice of words was appropriate. When played the way it should be, klezmer, a melange of Eastern European Jewish music and American jazz and popular genres, is a joyous music. And when the 12-piece aggregation broke into a Russian sher medley, members of the audience slowly but surely filled the aisles of the theater with a laughing, percolating, mobile quasi-conga line.
NEWS
August 12, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The federal government has hit a Glenside-based construction company with $77,500 in fines for allegedly exposing its employees to extremely dangerous levels of lead during reconstruction work on railway bridges in Philadelphia. In issuing a "willful" citation, one of its most stringent penalities, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) indicated its belief that Muratone Company Inc. knew or should have known about the hazard, which could cause death or serious injury.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2000 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Each of the four artists featured in "A Closer Look," guest-curated for the Beaver College Art Gallery by Alex Baker, rewards a viewer for making the trip to Glenside. Matthew Wine's creepy-looking sculptures, made from multicolored foam carpet-backing, transform a utilitarian domestic material into an intimation of alien life. The small green-and-yellow sculpture that appears to have attached itself to a window is especially unsettling. Susan Arthur's staged photographs - candy chicks, snowmen and such placed in outdoor settings - express something of the same surreal oddness.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
At night, the North Hills commuter train station on Mount Carmel Avenue near North Hills Avenue in Abington is lit up like Veterans Stadium on a night that the Phillies are at home. It wasn't always that way, though. Before the station was revamped, you couldn't see your hand in front of your face. One night back in those dark days, a man hid in one of the shacks that shielded commuters from the rain. A police officer patrolling the area failed to see him. When the officer left, the man broke into a car and used jumper cables in an attempt to steal it. But local residents on Townwatch patrol spotted him and alerted police.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Judith Joy Shore, 67, a Zionist volunteer, died Sunday at her home in Glenside. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mrs. Shore graduated from the Midwood High School and attended New York University. The longtime member of Hadassah served as president of the Henrietta Szold Group and of its Philadelphia chapter, and was still active with the organization at the time of her death. She volunteered for 10 years on the Service Committee of the National Board of Hadassah. She was a member of the commission that created the Sister Cities Plaza Celebration at 18th Street and the Parkway, marking the U.S. Bicentennial.
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Smith family of painters - four people regarded a century ago as the glamorous kind of artists travelers might write home about - is featured in a large revival show of the clan's work at the Berman Museum. Before this year is over, seven museum exhibits will have been held across the state honoring this Glenside family, including displays at Chestnut Hill's Woodmere Art Museum (now through May 17), the Independence Seaport Museum, and various road shows. These four once-popular artists worked in ways that transcended some of the aesthetic trends of their day, and they still don't fit easily into mainstream pigeonholes.
NEWS
February 9, 2013
A SEPTA train struck and killed an unidentified man Thursday evening in Montgomery County, the agency said. An outbound train on the Lansdale/Doylestown Line hit the man about 6:15 near the North Hills station in Glenside, said SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch. - Sam Wood
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NEWS
December 18, 2015
Christmas with Friends 8 p.m. Thursday at the Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside. Tickets: $37.50-$62. Information: 215-572-7650 or www.keswicktheatre.com
NEWS
October 28, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The person everyone wanted to see wasn't there. But the ceremony took place nonetheless, and people cheered the Dalai Lama in his absence as representatives of the human-rights advocate accepted the Liberty Medal on his behalf Monday. "People keep asking me, 'What is it about the Dalai Lama?' " the actor Richard Gere, a close friend, told several hundred people at the National Constitution Center. "It's that he's genuine, at all times. " Even, Gere added, when he's cranky. Health concerns forced the Tibetan religious leader to cancel his two-day appearance in Philadelphia.
FOOD
October 23, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Mexican in Bella Vista The name means "your mother's house," but the Day of the Dead motif at the new  La Casa de tu Madre  (800 Fitzwater St., 267-519-3242) presumes that Mom has a macabre sense of decorating. Jason Evenchik and his crew have done a rapid but dramatic renovation of what was Growlers in Bella Vista into this Mexican themer. Evenchik has retained Growlers chef Michael Thomas (ex-Kraftwork, Bar Ferdinand, Honey's Sit N Eat) to turn out a simple-to-comprehend menu of tacos, nachos, enchiladas, and burritos.
NEWS
October 20, 2015
A two-alarm fire Sunday morning rendered the clubhouse at Glenside's Lulu Country Club a total loss, fire officials said. The blaze broke out about 6:30 a.m. in the locker room of the 1920s structure on the 1600 block of Limekiln Pike, near Jenkintown Road. Flames quickly spread up through the basement, an open floor plan ballroom and through the timber roof of the 1920s structure. It took more than 100 firefighters from surrounding companies to extinguish the flames. No injuries were reported.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William C. Cochran, 87, of Ambler, a retired general surgeon, died Saturday, June 27, of complications from cancer at home. He was the husband of Rose Specca Cochran. The two lived in Ambler, and before that, Jenkintown. Born in Abington, he was the son of Harry A. Cochran and Molly A. Anderson. He graduated from Abington High School, Ursinus College, and Temple University Medical School. Dr. Cochran was a respected member of the staff at Abington Memorial Hospital, where he specialized in general surgery.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2015 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer
Comeback man D'Angelo 's in town tonigh t, performing with the Vanguard at Glenside's Keswick Theatre. Expect him to be clear-eyed and on point, experimental yet old-school, high-pitched and funky. Political and, well, more political. The multi-instrumentalist, once notorious as a sex object, later sad as an addict, then mostly gone from the scene, is now, once again, critically revered for his music. But he's also more than critical himself. D'Angelo appeared in Friday's New York Times alongside Black Panther co-founder Bobby Seale , riding around Oakland, Calif., discussing the need for a change of subject matter in popular hip-hop.
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Florence B. Watson, 71, of Glenside, a retired human resources official, died Friday, June 12, of complications from dementia at home. Mrs. Watson was born in Philadelphia, the daughter of Julia Jones and Walter D. Jones. Called Florrie by family and friends, Mrs. Watson graduated from John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' High School in 1961. Taking into account her life experience, she was able to earn the equivalent of a bachelor's degree and also a master's degree in human resources from Lincoln University in 1985.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Jack and Neha exercised at the same Center City CrossFit and knew each other by first name. Based on interactions during class, she thought he was "out there, loud, funny, and obviously very strong. " He thought - so erroneously - that she was quiet and shy. In July 2011, the class crew gathered socially to celebrate one trainer's 21st birthday, first at the gym, then at a bar around the corner. Neha and Jack started chatting, and had a lot of fun doing it. "I was so surprised by what her true personality is like," Jack remembered.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
In close-knit communities like Glenside, news of change can bring worry. That's what happened when two Tudor-style residential/retail buildings in Keswick Village, at Easton Road and North Keswick Avenue, were purchased for $6.2 million at bankruptcy auction in December by Center City real estate company Franklin Residential. "People would come in and ask me if the diner would be OK," said Jackie Ecker, who owns and operates the Village Diner in one of the two buildings that make up what is being called Keswick Commons.
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