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NEWS
July 8, 1993 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was a celebration of family and friendship Sunday as hundreds of Glenside residents gathered at the Harry Renninger Recreation Area for the community's 89th annual Independence Day Celebration. The day began with morning activities for children at the recreation area, followed by a parade in the early evening. Rene Mealey, who has headed the holiday celebration for two years, said the event cost $15,000 to stage. The money was raised through donations. "(Glenside) is the longest continuously running parade in the state," said Mealey, who has lived in Glenside for 24 years.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
Kimber Anne Cunnane, 27, died Sunday as a result of injuries suffered in a traffic accident that day outside Columbia, S.C. A former resident of Glenside, Miss Cunnane had been a saleswoman for the Sears Budget Rent-A-Car Co. in Columbia. She was a 1980 graduate of Bishop McDevitt High School and attended Montgomery County Community College. She had spent the last three years at Hilton Head Island, S.C., and planned to marry Daniel Santomaro of Columbia early next year. According to family members, Miss Cunnane was a free spirit who liked the outdoors, especially the beach, and the people of Columbia.
NEWS
April 22, 1991 | By Kevin L. Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shortly before the end of the Klezmer Conservatory Band's second hourlong set at the Keswick Theater in Glenside yesterday afternoon, bandleader Hankus Netsky thanked the capacity crowd for coming to the celebration. His choice of words was appropriate. When played the way it should be, klezmer, a melange of Eastern European Jewish music and American jazz and popular genres, is a joyous music. And when the 12-piece aggregation broke into a Russian sher medley, members of the audience slowly but surely filled the aisles of the theater with a laughing, percolating, mobile quasi-conga line.
NEWS
November 19, 1990 | By Sam Wood, Special to The Inquirer
In the realm of pop music, the Cocteau Twins are the proverbial mystery wrapped in an enigma. For the last eight years, the Twins have constructed a shimmering architecture of feverish dreams. Against that swirling backdrop, vocalist Elizabeth Fraser has sung in a language that resembles none spoken on Earth. Saturday night, the Cocteau Twins brought their netherworld music to the Keswick Theater in Glenside. For 90 minutes the three Twins - plus two additional guitarists - spun their hypnotic and ethereal creations for an entranced sellout audience.
NEWS
August 12, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The federal government has hit a Glenside-based construction company with $77,500 in fines for allegedly exposing its employees to extremely dangerous levels of lead during reconstruction work on railway bridges in Philadelphia. In issuing a "willful" citation, one of its most stringent penalities, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) indicated its belief that Muratone Company Inc. knew or should have known about the hazard, which could cause death or serious injury.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2000 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Each of the four artists featured in "A Closer Look," guest-curated for the Beaver College Art Gallery by Alex Baker, rewards a viewer for making the trip to Glenside. Matthew Wine's creepy-looking sculptures, made from multicolored foam carpet-backing, transform a utilitarian domestic material into an intimation of alien life. The small green-and-yellow sculpture that appears to have attached itself to a window is especially unsettling. Susan Arthur's staged photographs - candy chicks, snowmen and such placed in outdoor settings - express something of the same surreal oddness.
SPORTS
July 14, 2016 | By Mike Kern, Staff Writer
I HADN'T seen Mike Pettine in, well, way too long. I'd covered portions of his historic career at Central Bucks West, where he went 326-42-4 in 33 seasons before walking away following a third straight state title in 1999. He won his last 45 games. The Bucks also won 55 in a row in the 1980s, and I was there for about half of them. Since his retirement we'd spoken occasionally, always mentioning the possibility of getting together for a round of golf someday. That turned into one of these years.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
At night, the North Hills commuter train station on Mount Carmel Avenue near North Hills Avenue in Abington is lit up like Veterans Stadium on a night that the Phillies are at home. It wasn't always that way, though. Before the station was revamped, you couldn't see your hand in front of your face. One night back in those dark days, a man hid in one of the shacks that shielded commuters from the rain. A police officer patrolling the area failed to see him. When the officer left, the man broke into a car and used jumper cables in an attempt to steal it. But local residents on Townwatch patrol spotted him and alerted police.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Judith Joy Shore, 67, a Zionist volunteer, died Sunday at her home in Glenside. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mrs. Shore graduated from the Midwood High School and attended New York University. The longtime member of Hadassah served as president of the Henrietta Szold Group and of its Philadelphia chapter, and was still active with the organization at the time of her death. She volunteered for 10 years on the Service Committee of the National Board of Hadassah. She was a member of the commission that created the Sister Cities Plaza Celebration at 18th Street and the Parkway, marking the U.S. Bicentennial.
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Smith family of painters - four people regarded a century ago as the glamorous kind of artists travelers might write home about - is featured in a large revival show of the clan's work at the Berman Museum. Before this year is over, seven museum exhibits will have been held across the state honoring this Glenside family, including displays at Chestnut Hill's Woodmere Art Museum (now through May 17), the Independence Seaport Museum, and various road shows. These four once-popular artists worked in ways that transcended some of the aesthetic trends of their day, and they still don't fit easily into mainstream pigeonholes.
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SPORTS
July 14, 2016 | By Mike Kern, Staff Writer
I HADN'T seen Mike Pettine in, well, way too long. I'd covered portions of his historic career at Central Bucks West, where he went 326-42-4 in 33 seasons before walking away following a third straight state title in 1999. He won his last 45 games. The Bucks also won 55 in a row in the 1980s, and I was there for about half of them. Since his retirement we'd spoken occasionally, always mentioning the possibility of getting together for a round of golf someday. That turned into one of these years.
FOOD
July 1, 2016
Soda worth the extra cents There has been much ado about soda in the news lately. One bubbly beverage worth the extra 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax is the Philadelphia-brewed Press Gang Ginger Beer. It has the right amount of ginger, plus lime juice, vanilla, and, yes, cane sugar for sweetness. - Samantha Melamed Press Gang Ginger Beer, $3.99 for 11 ounces, at Fair Food Farmstand at the Reading Terminal Market, 51 N. 12th St., Philadelphia, 215-386-5211. For your fresh fruit The farmers' market is the inspiration for many of the wares at Heirloom Home & Studio, the small ceramics studio run by Gregg and Jackie Moore of Glenside.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
State and local officials are investigating alleged illegal dumping into Tookany Creek, which might be related to a contractor's work at a municipal swimming pool in Glenside, Cheltenham Township officials said Tuesday. Residents of the Montgomery County neighborhood reported a discharge in Tookany Creek near Renninger Park, Township Manager Bryan Havir said. "We jumped right away into action," he said. A contractor had been working at the Glenside pool to complete a water-blasting and painting project, Havir said.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Anndee Hochman, FOR THE INQUIRER
THE PARENTS: Natalie Levin, 45, and Cheryl Sterner, 34, of Glenside THE CHILD: Orion, born October 23, 2015 HOW THEY NAMED THE BABY: At a solstice party several years ago, the host's son was named Orion. Natalie, an astrology aficionado, thought it was "mystical without being ridiculous. " They figured Poppy Seed would be a girl. They were a household of females, after all: the two of them, plus Lily Beagle, and the five rescue cats. So why wouldn't their baby - the size of a poppy seed at conception, according to the fertility specialist - join the estrogen fest?
NEWS
April 13, 2016
ISSUE | PRINCETON Wilson's legacy Princeton University exercised good sense in retaining President Woodrow Wilson's name on its school of public and international affairs and an undergraduate residential college ("Princeton will retain Wilson's name," April 5). Medieval popes had armies and concubines, and George Washington and Thomas Jefferson owned slaves. Should we rob them of their transcendent contributions to a better world? Who among us can rise above our times and be judged out of historical context?
NEWS
December 18, 2015
Christmas with Friends 8 p.m. Thursday at the Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside. Tickets: $37.50-$62. Information: 215-572-7650 or www.keswicktheatre.com
NEWS
October 28, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The person everyone wanted to see wasn't there. But the ceremony took place nonetheless, and people cheered the Dalai Lama in his absence as representatives of the human-rights advocate accepted the Liberty Medal on his behalf Monday. "People keep asking me, 'What is it about the Dalai Lama?' " the actor Richard Gere, a close friend, told several hundred people at the National Constitution Center. "It's that he's genuine, at all times. " Even, Gere added, when he's cranky. Health concerns forced the Tibetan religious leader to cancel his two-day appearance in Philadelphia.
FOOD
October 23, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Mexican in Bella Vista The name means "your mother's house," but the Day of the Dead motif at the new  La Casa de tu Madre  (800 Fitzwater St., 267-519-3242) presumes that Mom has a macabre sense of decorating. Jason Evenchik and his crew have done a rapid but dramatic renovation of what was Growlers in Bella Vista into this Mexican themer. Evenchik has retained Growlers chef Michael Thomas (ex-Kraftwork, Bar Ferdinand, Honey's Sit N Eat) to turn out a simple-to-comprehend menu of tacos, nachos, enchiladas, and burritos.
NEWS
October 20, 2015
A two-alarm fire Sunday morning rendered the clubhouse at Glenside's Lulu Country Club a total loss, fire officials said. The blaze broke out about 6:30 a.m. in the locker room of the 1920s structure on the 1600 block of Limekiln Pike, near Jenkintown Road. Flames quickly spread up through the basement, an open floor plan ballroom and through the timber roof of the 1920s structure. It took more than 100 firefighters from surrounding companies to extinguish the flames. No injuries were reported.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William C. Cochran, 87, of Ambler, a retired general surgeon, died Saturday, June 27, of complications from cancer at home. He was the husband of Rose Specca Cochran. The two lived in Ambler, and before that, Jenkintown. Born in Abington, he was the son of Harry A. Cochran and Molly A. Anderson. He graduated from Abington High School, Ursinus College, and Temple University Medical School. Dr. Cochran was a respected member of the staff at Abington Memorial Hospital, where he specialized in general surgery.
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