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NEWS
July 8, 1993 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was a celebration of family and friendship Sunday as hundreds of Glenside residents gathered at the Harry Renninger Recreation Area for the community's 89th annual Independence Day Celebration. The day began with morning activities for children at the recreation area, followed by a parade in the early evening. Rene Mealey, who has headed the holiday celebration for two years, said the event cost $15,000 to stage. The money was raised through donations. "(Glenside) is the longest continuously running parade in the state," said Mealey, who has lived in Glenside for 24 years.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
Kimber Anne Cunnane, 27, died Sunday as a result of injuries suffered in a traffic accident that day outside Columbia, S.C. A former resident of Glenside, Miss Cunnane had been a saleswoman for the Sears Budget Rent-A-Car Co. in Columbia. She was a 1980 graduate of Bishop McDevitt High School and attended Montgomery County Community College. She had spent the last three years at Hilton Head Island, S.C., and planned to marry Daniel Santomaro of Columbia early next year. According to family members, Miss Cunnane was a free spirit who liked the outdoors, especially the beach, and the people of Columbia.
NEWS
November 19, 1990 | By Sam Wood, Special to The Inquirer
In the realm of pop music, the Cocteau Twins are the proverbial mystery wrapped in an enigma. For the last eight years, the Twins have constructed a shimmering architecture of feverish dreams. Against that swirling backdrop, vocalist Elizabeth Fraser has sung in a language that resembles none spoken on Earth. Saturday night, the Cocteau Twins brought their netherworld music to the Keswick Theater in Glenside. For 90 minutes the three Twins - plus two additional guitarists - spun their hypnotic and ethereal creations for an entranced sellout audience.
NEWS
April 22, 1991 | By Kevin L. Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shortly before the end of the Klezmer Conservatory Band's second hourlong set at the Keswick Theater in Glenside yesterday afternoon, bandleader Hankus Netsky thanked the capacity crowd for coming to the celebration. His choice of words was appropriate. When played the way it should be, klezmer, a melange of Eastern European Jewish music and American jazz and popular genres, is a joyous music. And when the 12-piece aggregation broke into a Russian sher medley, members of the audience slowly but surely filled the aisles of the theater with a laughing, percolating, mobile quasi-conga line.
NEWS
August 12, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The federal government has hit a Glenside-based construction company with $77,500 in fines for allegedly exposing its employees to extremely dangerous levels of lead during reconstruction work on railway bridges in Philadelphia. In issuing a "willful" citation, one of its most stringent penalities, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) indicated its belief that Muratone Company Inc. knew or should have known about the hazard, which could cause death or serious injury.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2000 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Each of the four artists featured in "A Closer Look," guest-curated for the Beaver College Art Gallery by Alex Baker, rewards a viewer for making the trip to Glenside. Matthew Wine's creepy-looking sculptures, made from multicolored foam carpet-backing, transform a utilitarian domestic material into an intimation of alien life. The small green-and-yellow sculpture that appears to have attached itself to a window is especially unsettling. Susan Arthur's staged photographs - candy chicks, snowmen and such placed in outdoor settings - express something of the same surreal oddness.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
At night, the North Hills commuter train station on Mount Carmel Avenue near North Hills Avenue in Abington is lit up like Veterans Stadium on a night that the Phillies are at home. It wasn't always that way, though. Before the station was revamped, you couldn't see your hand in front of your face. One night back in those dark days, a man hid in one of the shacks that shielded commuters from the rain. A police officer patrolling the area failed to see him. When the officer left, the man broke into a car and used jumper cables in an attempt to steal it. But local residents on Townwatch patrol spotted him and alerted police.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Judith Joy Shore, 67, a Zionist volunteer, died Sunday at her home in Glenside. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mrs. Shore graduated from the Midwood High School and attended New York University. The longtime member of Hadassah served as president of the Henrietta Szold Group and of its Philadelphia chapter, and was still active with the organization at the time of her death. She volunteered for 10 years on the Service Committee of the National Board of Hadassah. She was a member of the commission that created the Sister Cities Plaza Celebration at 18th Street and the Parkway, marking the U.S. Bicentennial.
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Smith family of painters - four people regarded a century ago as the glamorous kind of artists travelers might write home about - is featured in a large revival show of the clan's work at the Berman Museum. Before this year is over, seven museum exhibits will have been held across the state honoring this Glenside family, including displays at Chestnut Hill's Woodmere Art Museum (now through May 17), the Independence Seaport Museum, and various road shows. These four once-popular artists worked in ways that transcended some of the aesthetic trends of their day, and they still don't fit easily into mainstream pigeonholes.
NEWS
February 9, 2013
A SEPTA train struck and killed an unidentified man Thursday evening in Montgomery County, the agency said. An outbound train on the Lansdale/Doylestown Line hit the man about 6:15 near the North Hills station in Glenside, said SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch. - Sam Wood
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
THE MUSIC THAW is upon us, as tour buses dig out and get back on the road. Honestly, there's so much to see and hear that these picks are just icing on the cake - but at least not on the roads. We're excited about the intimate next coming of Lauryn Hill, the passionate and most unpredictable of neo-soul chanteuses. At another extreme, we're left to ponder whether Taylor Swift has the stage moves to reach and captivate a stadium full of fans (let alone two stadiums full). Pink and Katy Perry she hasn't been, but, come on, girl, surprise us. Ben Folds' three-day/three-venue residency is a clever idea.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
In close-knit communities like Glenside, news of change can bring worry. That's what happened when two Tudor-style residential/retail buildings in Keswick Village, at Easton Road and North Keswick Avenue, were purchased for $6.2 million at bankruptcy auction in December by Center City real estate company Franklin Residential. "People would come in and ask me if the diner would be OK," said Jackie Ecker, who owns and operates the Village Diner in one of the two buildings that make up what is being called Keswick Commons.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anita Magistro Udell's father was a North Jersey shoemaker from a small Sicilian town. Sicilian was the language at home, and so "she did not speak English until elementary school," daughter Ruth Kunstadter said. But soon, still in elementary school, she was commuting from her East Orange home for piano lessons in Greenwich Village. Living in three languages - and music is certainly a language - might have seemed quite natural for the youngster. On Wednesday, Feb. 18, Mrs. Udell, 93, foreign languages department chair during a 34-year teaching career at what is now Arcadia University in Glenside, died at the Rydal Park retirement community in Rydal.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
FEW THINGS in daily life are scarier than being trapped on a train with no heat or power that's draped with live wires. Except maybe a puddle of unidentified goo on the seat or the floor, but this story is not about that. Instead, about 500 rush-hour commuters found themselves stranded on SEPTA's Warminster Line after the live wire came down on the Center City-bound train just before 8:15 a.m. south of the Roslyn Station in Montgomery County. The passengers kept their cool - and their sense of humor - until SEPTA was able to scramble a "rescue train" to the disabled train to retrieve the marooned riders.
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dorothy Jane Cook Guy, 92, of Mount Airy, a founding member of Weaver's Way Co-op, died Wednesday, Jan. 7, of colon cancer at her home. Born in Bridgeport, Conn., Mrs. Guy moved with her family to Glenside and graduated from Abington High School. She worked as an IBM business machine repair woman from 1943 to 1947, and as an emergency room secretary at Chestnut Hill Hospital in the 1970s and 1980s. Her real passion, though, was community service - especially Weaver's Way, the cooperative she helped establish in West Mount Airy when such food-buying groups were rare.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 23-year-old Glenside man was convicted of third-degree murder and related charges Monday in the fatal shooting of a Temple University student and the wounding of two other men at a New Year's party in Philadelphia's Tioga section. Common Pleas Court Judge Barbara McDermott found Lawrence Jeffries guilty of the fatal shooting of Stephen Johnson and the wounding of Kyle Morris and Kashief Butler during a party in the early morning of New Year's Day 2013. All the victims were 22. The shootings occurred about 3:30 a.m. in the 1700 block of Venango Street when a fight started after someone stepped on another person's shoe.
NEWS
October 5, 2014 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
David Scholl and his brother were driving home from a funeral in South Carolina in 2008 when they started talking about what people would remember about them when they die. "We didn't really have anything, so we thought maybe we should run something," said Scholl, a database marketer for Siemens Healthcare who lives in Glenside. The funeral was a month after the Broad Street Run, so they decided to run that the following year. "That's how it started, and I'm trying not to stop," he said.
NEWS
May 10, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lee Davis, 93, a longtime barber in Philadelphia, died Sunday, May 4, of a heart attack at a nursing facility in Pleasanton, Calif. Mr. Davis had moved to the West Coast a decade ago to be near his son. In failing health, he died during a family party anticipating his 94th birthday on May 12. "He held on until we got there," said daughter Geraldine Andrews-Savage. The son of sharecroppers, Mr. Davis was raised in Augusta, Ga., during the Jim Crow era. In June 1943, he was drafted into a segregated unit of the Army.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IT WAS ABOUT 4 p.m. on Monday when Andre Washington Sr. saw his son for the last time. The two chatted in Washington's kitchen in Jenkintown as they waited for their dinner to cook. Then, the man told his pop that he was going to take a walk to his girlfriend's house. A few hours later, Washington opened his front door and came face to face with Abington Township Police officers. "I just hit the floor," Washington said. "It was like getting stabbed in the back. " They told him his son, who inherited his name, was dead, struck by a SEPTA Regional Rail train as he was walking on the tracks of the West Trenton Line near Noble Station, off Old York Road near Baeder, not far from that same kitchen.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Still struggling in the postrecession, local flower shops aren't just competing with supermarkets, discounters, and do-it-yourselfers. They're fighting to survive as a growing number of online middlemen known as "order-gatherers" sweep into the marketplace and take orders local florists used to receive. Sounds like an old story: Brick-and-mortar stores battle booming Internet competitors. But florists say these third-party retailers are using deceptive advertising and failing to give consumers a fair deal.
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