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NEWS
June 11, 1990 | By Mike Franolich, Special to The Inquirer
Donald D'Amato of Riverton had hoped to spend about an hour in a glider yesterday afternoon, sailing through a blue sky on warm buoyant air. But he lost his bearings on takeoff at the Hammonton Airport at 4 p.m. and lost his wind about 10 minutes later in Shamong Township, where he made an emergency landing in a bluegrass sod field on Indian Mills Road in a two-seat, Schweizer glider, officials said. "He just lost his wind and came on down," said Lester Abrams, owner of the Jade Run Turf & Sod Farm.
NEWS
May 5, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The pilot of a glider was injured Saturday during takeoff at the Van Sant Airport in Erwinna, Bucks County, police said. The 70-year-old man piloting the motorless aircraft was not identified. Police said he detached the glider from the airplane that was starting to pull it aloft. The glider then "bellyflopped" on the grass runway, and the pilot was taken to St. Luke's Hospital in Pennsburg with facial lacerations, said Bucks County Rangers chief Steve Long. Police said that they received a call at 11:43 a.m. reporting the incident.
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | By MILTON DANK
Fifty years ago this week, I was a 23-year-old glider pilot with the 439th Troop Carrier Group on my first combat mission participating in air and sea landings on the French Riviera. I was nervous but strangely elated after having missed the Normandy invasion. About 3 p.m. on Aug. 15, 1944, 372 twin-engined Dakotas, each towing a Waco CG-4A glider, took off from airfields near Rome. Besides my copilot (Bud Klimek, now of Lyme, Conn.), the glider carried two artillerymen of the famous 442nd "Go for Broke" Nisei Regiment and a jeep.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | By Lacy McCrary, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carol Hickey was an all-around athlete growing up in Dundalk, County Louth, Ireland. She played basketball and field hockey, and was a gymnast. Then, on Sept. 20, 1982, a truck struck her while she was riding her bicycle, breaking her spine. She was paralyzed from the waist down. For Hickey, now 24, that proved to be only an interruption to her active life, not an end. After four years in Ireland's National Rehabilitation Center in Dublin, Hickey got on with her life, began racing in a wheelchair and became a member of the Irish National Wheelchair Basketball Team.
NEWS
February 6, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A submersible, robotic glider that took on the frigid waters of the Antarctic has wowed oceanographers by collecting in 24 days almost as much data as research vessels had gathered in 12 years. The glider, operated from 7,000 miles away by a team of Rutgers researchers and their computer, was plucked from the water last week, its mission declared a resounding success. The complex ecosystem of the extreme southern waters is largely unknown and difficult to study, but hugely important since this is where global warming's effects are most dramatic.
NEWS
December 21, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sea was heaving, the skies gray. The captain of the research ship was worried about the weather. About 120 miles off the coast of Spain, three Rutgers University scientists had a narrow window of opportunity to find and retrieve their prize - an 8-foot, torpedo-shaped yellow robot that they had launched seven months earlier off the coast of New Jersey. They could grab it and learn from it, or in the rough seas accidentally ram it and sink it. After an hour of pitching in the 20-foot waves, the shipmates let out a cheer.
NEWS
October 31, 2004 | By Phil Joyce FOR THE INQUIRER
More so than surfers and golfers, fishers and farmers and, certainly, butchers, bakers and candlestick-makers, glider enthusiasts need ideal weather conditions to make their day. They look for cumulus clouds in the morning. If they see those billowy masses of moisture floating around in the atmosphere, and it is not too windy or rainy; if a cold front is coming in and warm surface air rising, it's: "Hook up the glider trailer, baby, we're going to fly!" Otto Zauner, 84, of Vineland, has spent many, many mornings looking at the sky for that heavenly sign of good soaring weather.
NEWS
September 14, 2004 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cathy McLaughlin hoisted herself from the wheelchair into the sailplane's cockpit using her arms. Her legs were eased into each side of the steering column by Fred Mann, who pilots gliders for Freedom's Wings International. The clear-plastic canopy was lowered, preflight check completed, and the glider hooked up to a tow plane that carried McLaughlin and Mann 3,000 feet aloft. Released over Van Sant Airport in Erwinna, Bucks County, the pair caught thermals - invisible uplifts - and for about 45 minutes traced lazy 8s and circles across the sky before coming down on the airport's grassy runway.
NEWS
January 9, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Things were going swimmingly for a Rutgers University robotic glider cruising through the frigid waters off Antarctica when, suddenly, its data-gathering mission was aborted. A mere teaspoon of water was to blame. The glider, dubbed ru05, had sprung a leak. Its onboard computer activated a satellite phone on its tail, which notified the Rutgers computer in New Brunswick. Humans sprang into action. And at 6 a.m. in Antarctica yesterday, about 12 hours after the leak was detected, a National Science Foundation research vessel plucked the ailing robot from the water.
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NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
He held the memories of that deadly day in 1944 deep inside, and wouldn't share them without persistent prodding from the family. Then, in his 80s, a few years before passing, my father, James Colimore, sat down at his desk at home to write about - and relive - what happened on D-Day. In a small book he gave to his three children and wife of 53 years, Lucille, he described the view from the cockpit of his glider, 2,000 feet over an armada of warships, unleashing "awesome and devastating" fire on the Normandy beaches.
NEWS
May 5, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The pilot of a glider was injured Saturday during takeoff at the Van Sant Airport in Erwinna, Bucks County, police said. The 70-year-old man piloting the motorless aircraft was not identified. Police said he detached the glider from the airplane that was starting to pull it aloft. The glider then "bellyflopped" on the grass runway, and the pilot was taken to St. Luke's Hospital in Pennsburg with facial lacerations, said Bucks County Rangers chief Steve Long. Police said that they received a call at 11:43 a.m. reporting the incident.
NEWS
July 15, 2012
Two people were injured Friday in the crash of a small glider near an upper Bucks County airport, authorities said. The accident happened around 3:30 p.m. at the Philadelphia Gliderport in Hilltown Township, officials said. The two people on the aircraft were flown to hospitals in the area, NBC10 reported. Their conditions were not released Friday night. Police are investigating what caused the crash. - AP
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lewis W. Hull spent a lifetime flying gliders. "He flew well into his 80s and into his 90s," a son, Stephen, said in a phone interview. "A week after getting out of the hospital from a heart attack, he flew . . . and soared and had a wonderful time," his son said. That was in 2009, the year he turned 93. On Sunday, Feb. 26, Mr. Hull, 95, of Southampton, Bucks County, died of heart failure at Abington Memorial Hospital. He founded Hull Corp. in 1952 and was its president when the Hatboro firm was sold in 2002.
NEWS
May 30, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The Greatest Generation? Maybe the Luckiest, if you listened to the men and woman of World War II who gathered the other day to tell their stories. Stanley Meshkov said his good fortune was to throw up in his helmet. It made the difference between life and death. He was 20 on March 24, 1945, a South Philly kid in the 101st Airborne Division, flying in a glider headed over the Rhine. "Halfway over, I got airsick," he said. "The pilot turned around and said, 'Whatsa matter, kid?
NEWS
December 21, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sea was heaving, the skies gray. The captain of the research ship was worried about the weather. About 120 miles off the coast of Spain, three Rutgers University scientists had a narrow window of opportunity to find and retrieve their prize - an 8-foot, torpedo-shaped yellow robot that they had launched seven months earlier off the coast of New Jersey. They could grab it and learn from it, or in the rough seas accidentally ram it and sink it. After an hour of pitching in the 20-foot waves, the shipmates let out a cheer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2007 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
Terri Barrow calls herself the Segway Goddess, leader of the go slow, but go motorized movement. "No one rides a Segway and doesn't have a smile at the end of the ride," said Barrow, who with her husband, Hal, and two other partners owns Ride N Glide by the Dorset Avenue Bridge in Ventnor. Ride N Glide will put you on the modernistic Segway personal transporter in no time and have you smiling uncontrollably while you glide around Absecon Island. The Segway PT (for "personal transporter")
NEWS
May 4, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Belida Aiken Elson, 88, of Plymouth Meeting, a writer and volunteer who named the Please Touch Museum, died Monday of small cell carcinoma at home. In the 1970s, Mrs. Elson met Portia Sperr, a Montessori educator who planned to establish a children's museum in Philadelphia. Mrs. Elson joined the founding board of the museum and proposed its name. She used the words please and touch, said her son, Wylie, because she wanted young visitors to respect the objects displayed and at the same time know they were accessible.
NEWS
February 6, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A submersible, robotic glider that took on the frigid waters of the Antarctic has wowed oceanographers by collecting in 24 days almost as much data as research vessels had gathered in 12 years. The glider, operated from 7,000 miles away by a team of Rutgers researchers and their computer, was plucked from the water last week, its mission declared a resounding success. The complex ecosystem of the extreme southern waters is largely unknown and difficult to study, but hugely important since this is where global warming's effects are most dramatic.
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