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Global Village

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NEWS
October 31, 1997 | By John Allen Paulos
A parable with some relevance to recent events in the stock market: Imagine some benightedly sexist village in which there are 50 married couples. Each woman immediately knows when another woman's husband has been unfaithful but never when her own has. The strict feminist laws of the village require that if a woman can prove that her husband has been unfaithful, she must kill him that very day. The women are law-abiding, smart, and know that the other women are smart and never inform other women of their philandering husbands.
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | By S.E. Siebert, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
It's a matter of perspective. To some, scruffy would describe the courtyard at Warrington's Titus Elementary School. To Merry Lee Chandler, it's a window on the world. The fifth-grade teacher is working to convert the atrium into a global village, complete with concrete relief maps and symbols representing different countries. Chandler sees the grassy space as a sanctuary and museum for students, offering a place to study and learn. "They'll see how the world is set up, and where they fit in the scheme of things," she said.
NEWS
July 4, 1997 | By Trudy Rubin
I'm a great admirer of Ted Turner for having had the vision to create the first global TV news network. His goal of making news accessible via satellite from any point to every point around the globe speaks to the needs of new and struggling democracies for more information. So Turner's Cable News Network International (CNNI) is a great choice for this year's Philadelphia Liberty Medal, awarded for leadership in furthering liberty and democratic values. Past winners include Czech President Vaclav Havel, South Africans F.W. de Klerk and Nelson Mandela, and former Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres and Jordan's King Hussein.
NEWS
October 4, 1996 | For The Inquirer / CLIFF MAUTNER
The global village found a home in Triton High School this week, where students celebrated their diversity as part of the state's "Many Faces - One Family" week. Students from Turkey, China, Italy, Sweden, Pakistan, Vietnam and elsewhere shared their cultures and costumes in programs throughout the week. Anisah Bagasra (left) and Nadia Khan donned Pakistani garb for their discussion of Pakistan.
NEWS
February 18, 2010
IN HIS GROUNDBREAKING critique of popular culture in the electronic age, Marshall McLuhan coined the phrase the "global village. " But not even this prescient prophet of the new age envisioned people who use "social media" to form "flash mobs" that wreak havoc on total strangers. Incidents such as the mob rampage in Philadelphia this week -in which 150 mindless marauders took to the streets of Center City in a wave of assaults and property damage - are being played out all over America.
NEWS
June 8, 1999
This war is . . . the end of Europe, the end of the United States, the end of Serbia, and the end of Kosovo. But it is the beginning of the world. Why? This illegal war (because it was taken on without the United Nations) confirms the existence of a right in principle to intervene in cases of serious violations of human rights in any country. It is a first step in a process that is leading to the creation of a global police. We are living through the first war of globalization.
NEWS
September 7, 1997 | By Srdja Trifkovic
The sudden and gruesome death of a woman in her prime, especially the mother of adolescent children, is an inherently sad event. With Princess Diana it has the makings of a real tragedy, in view of her personal unhappiness. She was pushed into an ultra-visible marriage with an unloving, aloof and eccentric man nearly 13 years her senior. To make things worse, her husband was infatuated - and adulterously involved - with another woman throughout the marriage. Condemned to an unsettled private life of loneliness and emotional turmoil, Diana lacked the stamina of her sturdier predecessors (notably Alexandra, Princess of Wales and later Queen of England)
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
The grounds at Ancillae-Assumpta Academy were transformed into an open-air market on Sunday as flea market-style tables blanketed the campus on Church Road in Wyncote. But the tables and booths at the Second Annual Cheltenham Peace Fair were not offering hand-me-downs or second-hand dishes; instead, they promoted a variety of causes and human-rights battles that stretch from Montgomery County to South America. The fair attracted representatives from 34 organizations ranging from Amnesty International to the League of Women Voters of Abington to the New Jewish Agenda to the Palestine Solidarity Committee.
NEWS
October 21, 2002 | By Nora Koch INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As she moved through the cafeteria line for her first meal at Seabrook Farms in Upper Deerfield in 1945, Iddy Asada's mother was startled when a tall man tapped her on the shoulder. The tiny Japanese American woman looked up into the face of one of the first African American men she had ever seen. "Welcome to New Jersey," he said. With that greeting, the nine-member Asada family, seeking a new life after spending three years in an internment camp in Arizona, felt at home in what has been called "the first rural global village.
NEWS
September 22, 1997
Talk about putting your money where your mouth is. Ted Turner earned the nickname "Mouth of the South" in his flamboyant rise from billboard company executive to founder of CNN and a global media empire. But his pledge of $1 billion to benefit United Nations causes such as refugees, the environment and land-mine clearance gives new weight to the role he has played (sometimes clumsily) as prophet of the global village. Not only has he shamed the U.S. government, which owes the world body $1.5 billion in back dues, but he has challenged others who have made fortunes on new global technologies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you had a thousand ears, each one trained on a different radio outlet, you couldn't have heard all the great radio on offer yesterday. On the day after Osama bin Laden died, the full spectacle of radio was on display. From local talkers to Radio France International, the venerable mass medium showed its stuff, pulling together memorable, mind-changing facts, viewpoints, and you-are-there vignettes to explore the complexities of an incredibly rich story. All radio today is global.
NEWS
February 18, 2010
IN HIS GROUNDBREAKING critique of popular culture in the electronic age, Marshall McLuhan coined the phrase the "global village. " But not even this prescient prophet of the new age envisioned people who use "social media" to form "flash mobs" that wreak havoc on total strangers. Incidents such as the mob rampage in Philadelphia this week -in which 150 mindless marauders took to the streets of Center City in a wave of assaults and property damage - are being played out all over America.
NEWS
August 24, 2007 | Claudena M. Skran
Claudena M. Skran is associate professor of government and coordinator of the international studies program at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wis. At age 12, orphaned Abu Marah mined for diamonds in a country torn apart by civil war. For his labors, he earned one cup of rice a day. After three years of hardship, Marah moved to the capital city of Sierra Leone, where he worked selling water on the streets. When Freetown was sacked by rebel forces in 1999, Marah walked to neighboring Guinea as a refugee.
NEWS
April 6, 2007 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
In broad daylight, at least three people fire 40 shots in front of 20 witnesses, killing a mother trying to protect her children on a narrow little street in Southwest Philadelphia. And nobody sees a thing? In North Philly, a shell-shocked mom tries to point out the person she thinks shot her teenage son and people in the crowd warn her she'd better not say anything or "we'll get you, bitch. " And she doesn't say a thing. The message is clear. No snitching. Or else. Here in Philadelphia, where the blood drain totals 104 victims, most of them black, we've got public mourning down to a science.
NEWS
March 26, 2006 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a single day, my friend and I danced the rumba and jitterbug to Chinese pop music, lingered over Malaysian curry and tofu, and savored slowly roasted Cuban pork and a hearty Irish ale. Though we sampled many of the borough's sights, sounds and tastes, we had barely begun to dig into the international delights of Queens, home to people from more than 150 countries. A day there is a fast-motion trip around the world. At Times Square, we stepped onto the 7 train, also known as the International Express because it zips through so many different ethnic neighborhoods.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By Barbara Pfeiffer
I moved to Camden 18 years ago, having been born and raised in Manhattan and after graduating from the University of Michigan and living and teaching in Tokyo and Honolulu. It is in Camden where I find my global village. Americans of African, Hispanic, Vietnamese, Korean, Chinese, Polish, Irish and German descent (to name a few), about 1,700 of us, all live in the Waterfront South neighborhood. It's the same Waterfront South that the people managing the Camden Recovery Act want to exclude from "recovery.
NEWS
October 21, 2002 | By Nora Koch INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As she moved through the cafeteria line for her first meal at Seabrook Farms in Upper Deerfield in 1945, Iddy Asada's mother was startled when a tall man tapped her on the shoulder. The tiny Japanese American woman looked up into the face of one of the first African American men she had ever seen. "Welcome to New Jersey," he said. With that greeting, the nine-member Asada family, seeking a new life after spending three years in an internment camp in Arizona, felt at home in what has been called "the first rural global village.
NEWS
August 13, 2002 | William Raspberry
What aspect of America's international policy causes you the most distress or the greatest disappointment? It was, of course, the sort of fat-pitch question reporters don't like to ask. I asked it because I thought U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan would use it to provide a much-needed glimpse of how America is seen - not by its enemies but by its thoughtful admirers. He didn't disappoint. Americans, he told a couple dozen African American journalists recently, are full of talk about a "global village" as an acknowledgement of the shrinking size and growing interdependence of the nations of the world.
NEWS
June 15, 2002
It's a global village and the Internet is its crossroads. Like a New England village in a Hawthorne novel, the Internet crossroads bustle with people eager to trade rumors and gossip, to believe the worst about their fellow man. Yes, rumors and gossip have always been around to erode civic trust. But with the speed-of-light reach of the Internet, the adage that rumor can be halfway around the globe before truth gets out of bed has more validity than ever. Sometimes, the results are funny - but even then, the laughter can leave a bitter tang.
FOOD
October 17, 2001 | By Maria Gallagher FOR THE INQUIRER
They fly through the air with the greatest of ease. They stand on lightbulbs en pointe while balancing other performers on their shoulders. They dive through hoops with the grace of dolphins, with no water to cushion their landings. And when they are done, the acrobats, dancers, gymnasts, jugglers, contortionists, stilt-walkers, musicians and clowns who perform with Cirque du Soleil are mighty hungry. "Look, he just took a second dessert," teased American-born Amrapali Ambegaokar, 23, who dances the role of an exotic water goddess in the production of Dralion that runs through Nov. 4 under the big top at Broad Street and Washington Avenue.
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