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Global Warming

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NEWS
June 15, 2009
SEVERE flooding, heat-related deaths, unhealthy air, loss of species and damage to agriculture and industry are some of the threats we face as a result of global warming. PennEnvironment reports that this state is a leading contributor to global warming in the U.S., responsible for 1 percent of total global emissions. But there's hope. Congress can tackle global warming through clean-energy solutions and capping global warming pollution. It's called the American Clean Energy & Security Act. Without serious action, Pennsylvania will continue to be affected by global warming.
NEWS
March 29, 2005 | By GREG VITALI
ON FEB. 15, the eve of the effective date of the Kyoto Treaty on global warming, I introduced the Pennsylvania Greenhouse Gas Reduction Act (H.B. 500), which would represent an important first step for Pennsylvania in addressing global climate change. Our federal government's failure to sign on to Kyoto makes it even more important for individual states to take action. Pennsylvania has a particular responsibility to act. Our state alone produces about 1 percent of the world's greenhouse gas emissions, more than 105 developing nations combined.
NEWS
May 16, 2008
It's a change of weather, all right. Whoever the next president is, he or she will support federal laws that regulate greenhouse-gas emissions. In speeches this week in Oregon, Sen. John McCain came out for the idea, joining Sens. Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. McCain's plan is more business-friendly than those of his two Democratic rivals for president. But this general agreement signals a welcome and needed swing away from the stubborn policies of the Bush administration. It's hard to overstate the coming change in the White House.
NEWS
February 23, 2007 | By VANCE LEHMKUHL
HMMM. DO THE folks at Big Oil care about the fate of the planet? Really care? Last week, Exxon's CEO urged a slow-down of moves to address global warming, called U.S. energy independence unrealistic and mocked biofuels as "moonshine. " And the American Enterprise Institute (which gets some funding from Exxon) offered scientists $10,000 to dispute the new report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a report that gave a "90 percent certainty" to human activity causing global warming.
NEWS
March 15, 2004 | By Walter Cronkite
The contempt of the Bush administration for environmentalists and their concerns is well known by now. While evidence of man- made environmental damage mounts, the Bush team resists its implications like a defeated army whose rear guard fights off its pursuers as it retreats. That has been especially true of its handling of the most serious of all environmental issues - global warming. First, the administration claimed that global warming was the work of liberal hysterics and had been discounted by "more sober scientists.
NEWS
July 12, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Predicted changes from global warming - hotter summers, less snowy winters, flooding and erosion along the Jersey coast - are taken to new levels of the nitty-gritty in a comprehensive look at trends in the Northeastern United States released yesterday after two years of study. Heat-stressed cows might produce 20 percent less milk. Major crops such as corn and blueberries could slack off. The makeup of forests in Pennsylvania and New Jersey would change, with cascading effects on birds and other species that live there.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2007 | By Valerie Kuklenski LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS
An Inconvenient Truth, the Oscar-winning 2006 documentary about Al Gore's little slide show, offers a wealth of facts, figures and graphs on the state of the planet and its grim future if current global warming trends are not reversed. It will fall to today's children, though, to keep environmental awareness at the forefront as they become architects, engineers and consumers themselves - children who are not yet patient or verbal enough to sit through An Inconvenient Truth. Arctic Tale conveys the message to kids in an endearing story wrapped around some of the most compelling footage ever captured at the top of the world.
NEWS
August 18, 2011 | By Aman Batheja, McClatchy Newspapers
FORT WORTH, Texas - Texas Gov. Rick Perry found himself at the center of attention again Wednesday, this time after reiterating his skepticism over climate change and his belief that some scientists have manipulated data to keep the issue alive. Two days after drawing fire for blunt comments regarding Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke, Perry decried the global-warming issue as "politicized" and questioned the science behind it while speaking at an event in New Hampshire.
NEWS
July 8, 2012 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Is it just freakish weather or something more? Climate scientists suggest that if you want a glimpse of some of the worst of global warming, take a look at U.S. weather in recent weeks. Horrendous wildfires. Oppressive heat waves. Devastating droughts. Flooding from giant deluges. And a powerful freak wind storm called a derecho . These are the kinds of extremes experts have predicted will come with climate change, although it's far too early to say that is the cause.
NEWS
November 7, 2003
I 'M DISAPPOINTED by the Daily News' lack of coverage on last week's historic opportunity to cap U.S. global-warming pollution. You remained silent while Sens. Specter and Santorum rejected this opportunity. The McCain-Lieberman Climate Stewardship Act would have required a reduction in global-warming pollution to 2000 levels by 2010, a long-overdue first step to stopping global warming. Scientists warn that doing nothing to reduce global-warming pollution will increase the frequency and severity of costly extreme weather events like drought, floods and hurricanes.
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NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pope Francis issued a much-anticipated papal letter Thursday on the state of the Earth, decrying the modern "culture of waste" and warning of the "tragic effects of environmental degradation on the lives of the world's poorest. " He also decried the voracious consumerism of developed nations, and deplored what he said were moneyed interests seeking to obscure scientific knowledge of the problems and thwart necessary political action. "Humanity is called to recognize the need for changes of lifestyle, production, and consumption," Francis said.
NEWS
October 2, 2014
Global warming concerns aren't worth risking good coal, oil, and gas jobs so soon after the recession. We can put off action on global warming, but we'll pay a worse price in the end. Face reality and adapt. |Stephen M. Smith, Burlington City The long term risks to everyones' health far outweigh the short term goals of a few jobs in these types of energy that aren't clean. |JoAnn Williams, Media With the effects of climate change clearly apparent, action to mitigate it is urgent and can be taken in an economically feasible way. |Bill Fanshel, Bryn Mawr Seriously combating global warming with renewable fuel - wind, sea, sun - should enable us to replace those allegedly lost jobs without economic repercussions.
NEWS
June 5, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
TOM STEYER, a politically active hedge-fund billionaire from San Francisco who calls global warming "the greatest moral crisis of our time," draws the sign of the cross on his left hand with a ballpoint pen every day. His right hand will soon be busy writing something else: large checks that he hopes will help elect Democrat Tom Wolf as the next governor of Pennsylvania. Political advisers say the progressive, unconventional retired financier has decided to invest a fortune - estimates range from $8 million to a whopping $15 million, depending on the closeness of the race - to block Gov. Corbett from a second term because he believes that the Republican "den[ies]
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
PAT SAJAK may not think the Earth is getting warmer, but one thing is for sure: Sajak himself is steaming. The usually mild-mannered "Wheel of Fortune" host took to Twitter to claim, "Global warming alarmists are unpatriotic racists. " Huh? While a reasoned argument might be that civilization is too dependent on fossil fuels to put that genie back in the bottle so we're just going to have to live (or possibly not live) with the consequences, the notion that being overly concerned with the future of the planet (right or wrong)
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | by Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the high-stakes conflict over U.S. climate-change policy, groups that deny or cast doubt on global warming brought in $7.2 billion from 2003 through 2010 - less than a third of it publicly traceable to the donors. In a recently released study of 91 such organizations, a Drexel University professor found that $5.2 billion of their funding was "dark money" from undisclosed sources. Also of unknown origin: $78 million channeled by major benefactors through a special nonprofit that then redirected the money while keeping the givers' identities private.
NEWS
February 4, 2014
With major international corporations like Coca-Cola and Nike finally acknowledging that global warming is bad for business, efforts to curb the causes of climate change are getting some needed allies. Companies that rely on clean water and predictable weather are welcome participants in this important conversation. It is in their best interests, and everyone else's on Earth, to address global warming. For far too long, some fossil-fuel barons have tried to shout down anyone linking climate change to the economy, as they either insisted that there is no such thing as global warming or claimed that mandatory efforts to cut greenhouse gases would raise consumer prices.
NEWS
January 24, 2014
THE WORLD has very little time - perhaps 15 years - to make serious inroads on climate change, according to a leaked report from a U.N. panel. Current efforts, even among the most committed nations, fall short, and at the current rate of carbon emissions, the problem might grow too large to overcome with existing technology. Yet the recalcitrance and myth-making about global warming continue - and become more prevalent - in the United States. Last week, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell moved to employ a little-known law to try to halt a key part of the Obama administration's climate plan.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Charles Krauthammer
The economy stagnates. Syria burns. Scandals lap at his feet. China and Russia mock him, even as a "29-year-old hacker" revealed his nation's spy secrets to the world. How does President Obama respond? With a grandiloquent speech on climate change. Climate change? It lies at the very bottom of a list of Americans' concerns (last of 21 - Pew poll). Which means that Obama's declaration of unilateral American war on global warming, whatever the cost - and it will be heavy - is either highly visionary or hopelessly solipsistic.
NEWS
June 12, 2013 | By Jennifer Peltz, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Giant removable floodwalls would be erected around lower Manhattan, and levees, gates, and other defenses would be built elsewhere around the city under a nearly $20 billion plan proposed Tuesday by Mayor Michael Bloomberg to protect New York from storms and the effects of global warming. It is one of the most ambitious projects ever proposed for defending a major U.S. city from the rising seas and severe weather that climate change is expected to bring. It was outlined seven months after Hurricane Sandy drove home the danger by swamping Lower Manhattan and smashing homes and businesses in other shoreline neighborhoods.
NEWS
March 17, 2013 | By Juliet Eilperin, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration is leaning toward revising its landmark proposal to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from new power plants, according to several individuals briefed on the matter, a move that would delay tougher restrictions and could anger many environmentalists. The discussions center on the first-ever greenhouse gas regulations for power plants, which were proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency nearly a year ago. Rewriting the proposal would significantly delay any action, and might allow the agency to set a separate standard for coal-fired power plants, which are roughly twice as polluting as those fueled by natural gas. While the move could bolster the administration's legal justification for regulating power plants' carbon emissions, any delay on the rules would be a blow to environmental groups and their supporters, who constituted a crucial voting bloc for President Obama and other Democrats in last year's elections.
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