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February 28, 2016
International Pop Through May 15 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 26th Street and the Parkway. Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, until 8:45 p.m. Wednesday and Friday. Admission: Adults, $20; seniors (65 and up), $18; students and youths (13-18), $14; children, free. (Discount available online.) Information: 215-763-8100 or www.philamuseum.org .
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Backstage, behind the black canvas curtain, they are hot-dogging - pulling wheelies on the little silver motorbikes that leak gray smoke and sound like chain saws. Noe Espana, 25, the oldest and most serious of the trio, stops to chat with one of the Chinese acrobats. Noe's brother, Ivan, 23, and teammate Carlos Leal, 22, roar up and down the concrete ramp in their silver boots and gray jumpsuits. It is almost time. They put on their helmets with the purple, pink and orange sequins.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1997 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles Clendenning was trying to find Albania for some other students in Donna Chestnut's third-period class at Overbrook Junior High School in Lindenwold. After scanning a globe, the eighth grader used a special stylus to touch what he thought was the tiny Balkan nation. "Look northeast 1,000 miles," instructed a voice inside the globe. Charles made another attempt, and the globe advised: "Try southeast. " Then he spotted the small strip of land lying along the Adriatic Sea between Yugoslavia and Greece.
TRAVEL
February 5, 2012
We were sitting outside our cottage on New Zealand's South Island watching the sun set over the Takitumu Mountains. It was Thanksgiving morning back in America, the first time we had been away from home for the holiday, but here in the Southern Hemisphere it was just another day. It also happened to mark three months since the day we boarded a flight from Philadelphia to begin our yearlong around-the-world journey. The holiday and benchmark made us reflect on the decision we made to "chuck it all" and take off around the globe.
NEWS
May 18, 1998 | By Patricia M. La Hay, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Father's Day comes next month, many people will be thinking about the lessons their fathers have taught them: tying shoes, swinging a bat, multiplying fractions. Eighteen-year old Frances Flores probably will be doing what her father taught her: riding a motorcycle around the inside of a big iron globe at up to 65 m.p.h. One of only three women in the country to perform in the so-called Globe of Death (her sister, Victoria, is another), Frances Flores and her family are on the road nine months a year performing their Fearless Flores Circus and Thrill Show at county and state fairs.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1990 | DEIRDRE HAMILL/ DAILY NEWS
Tony Cordisio (left) and James McDonald assemble a 6-foot, 500-pound globe in the Rand McNally Map & Travel Store in Liberty Place, due to open Aug. 31. If you decide you must have one to keep up with world events, the hand-painted globe will sell for about $39,000, plus shipping.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1990 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / DAVID T. FOSTER 3D
For $39,000 (plus tax and delivery charges), you can own the world. Well, you can own a replica of it. The geophysical globe, six feet in diameter and 500 pounds, was delivered yesterday to the new Rand McNally Map & Travel Store at One Liberty Place in Center City. A crew of six was needed to carry the globe and hoist it, hemisphere by hemisphere, into place, suspended from the ceiling. The store, Rand McNally's fifth, will be open to the public on Aug. 31.
NEWS
August 18, 1998
Steve Fossett apparently is not one to take a hint. Three times before he had tried to fly around the globe in a balloon. Three times the globe had found ways to say, "Don't think so. " Mr. Fossett's fourth try, which plunged scarily into the Coral Sea off Australia on Sunday, was both his most hair-raising failure and spectacular success. He completed two-thirds of his trip, the longest balloon flight ever. But the flight ended with an abrupt, storm-induced drop of 29,000 feet into shark-infested waters, where the balloonist spent eight nervous hours in a raft before being rescued.
NEWS
March 9, 1995 | By Wes Conard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Professor Richard Bush's cramped university office in West Chester has a better view than most in the science department. From his desk, Bush watched the Mississippi River surge over its banks during the 1993 floods. Later that year, he saw Hurricane Emily, all 300 miles of it, whirling like a misty nautilus shell off the coast of North Carolina. Yesterday he kept an eye on a cold front - an ominous 500-mile-wide white stripe of rain and snow stretching from Michigan to Arkansas - as it crept across the Midwest and put an end to Pennsylvania's unseasonably balmy weather.
NEWS
January 8, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
NEW YORK - There's no reason for panic. Worry, yes, but not panic. That was the opinion of some U.S. investment strategists after another free-fall on China's main stock market reverberated around the globe yesterday and sent the Dow Jones average to a loss of nearly 400 points. Stock prices in China fell so fast that for the second time in four days, circuit-breaker mechanisms kicked in and halted trading, this time after just 30 minutes. China's tumbling stock prices are, in themselves, nothing for investors outside the country to panic over.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 7, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Socially responsible investing used to be on the fringe. Now, it's officially mainstream, said Amy O'Brien, managing director and head of TIAA Global Asset Management's Responsible Investment Team. But for any given company or group of them, what constitutes the relevant ways to be socially responsible or sustainable? "Jargon is certainly part of the problem," O'Brien said. To solve that problem, the fund-tracking firm Morningstar earlier this year introduced the industry's first scoring system for mutual funds and exchange-traded funds for ESG, or environmental, social, and governance metrics.
NEWS
February 28, 2016
International Pop Through May 15 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 26th Street and the Parkway. Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, until 8:45 p.m. Wednesday and Friday. Admission: Adults, $20; seniors (65 and up), $18; students and youths (13-18), $14; children, free. (Discount available online.) Information: 215-763-8100 or www.philamuseum.org .
NEWS
January 12, 2016
His famous alter-ego has a statue in Philadelphia and now Sylvester Stallone has a Golden Globe for playing an aging Rocky Balboa. The 69-year-old actor received a standing ovation Sunday as he accepted a supporting actor award from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association for his performance in the Philadelphia-filmed Creed , 39 years after last being nominated (and not winning) for the original Rocky . "I'd like to thank my imaginary friend Rocky Balboa for being the best friend I ever had," said Stallone, in what was probably the best unbleeped line of the night.
NEWS
January 12, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington
It seems the fashion universe is ruled by the most considerate of goddesses, and it was she who declared pockets were a must-have on the Golden Globes red carpet Sunday night. Ivory - as opposed to last year's blinding optic white - was among the evening's most popular hues. And blush - or rose quartz, Pantone's color of the year - was at least the runner-up shade. Frocks that weren't a matte pastel sparkled with a flurry of jewel-toned sequins. Sleeves were key. Deep Vs were essential, and capes amped up the night's drama.
NEWS
January 11, 2016
* MADAM SECRETARY 8 p.m. Sunday, CBS3. The show returns after last month's cliffhanger with Secretary of State Elizabeth McCord (Téa Leoni) trying to save the Russian peace deal. Oh, and there's some emergency aboard the International Space Station that's going to be her problem, too. Because the woman never sleeps. * SHAMELESS. 9 p.m. Sunday, Showtime. It's the Season 6 premiere and somehow Frank Gallagher (William H. Macy) is still among the living. His daughter Fiona (Emmy Rossum)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2016 | Molly Eichel, Steven Rea, Staff Writers
The Golden Globes - airing at 8 p.m. Sunday on NBC10 - don't matter. They're trivial, kind of stupid, and have little bearing on the entertainment industry. But that's what makes them so great. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) - a shady group of individuals who don't actually seem to be a part of the foreign press - throw the best party of the year. Because it doesn't really matter. It's like Whose Line Is It Anyway? in that points are given out, but none counts.
NEWS
January 8, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
NEW YORK - There's no reason for panic. Worry, yes, but not panic. That was the opinion of some U.S. investment strategists after another free-fall on China's main stock market reverberated around the globe yesterday and sent the Dow Jones average to a loss of nearly 400 points. Stock prices in China fell so fast that for the second time in four days, circuit-breaker mechanisms kicked in and halted trading, this time after just 30 minutes. China's tumbling stock prices are, in themselves, nothing for investors outside the country to panic over.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
FOR THE lucky few, the next few months are known as awards season. For the unlucky many, it's snub season. With the Golden Globe nominations announced yesterday (see Page 34), the Washington Post was quick to weigh in on those who were unfairly (or fairly) dissed. The Post cited broadcast TV as a major loser this year, with almost all the nods going to pay-cable and streaming services and individually called out "The Americans," "Black-ish," "Fresh Off the Boat," "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt" and "Inside Amy Schumer " as shows that were underappreciated.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  When George S. Weber and his group completed their climb to the summit of the Matterhorn in the Swiss Alps in the 1950s, "he felt extremely blessed," a daughter, Ann Weber-Ammar, said. During such outdoor adventures, he told her later, "he had a sense of tremendous freedom and communion with God. " He certainly felt blessed, she said, when learning later about another party climbing at the same time, a group in which "someone did not make it to the top and fell to their death.
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