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Gloria Bonilla Santiago

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NEWS
May 13, 2001 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Camden County chapter of the American Red Cross honored three county residents at the group's 13th annual Good Neighbor awards ceremony May 3. Those cited as "humanitarians" were Gloria Bonilla-Santiago of Voorhees, the director of the Center for Strategic Urban Development, Rutgers-Camden; Tom Corcoran of Camden, the executive director of the Cooper's Ferry Development Association in Camden; and Leslie Hirsch of Voorhees, the president and...
NEWS
December 2, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Work is to begin Monday to transform Camden's historic Wilson Building on North Broadway into an outpost for LEAP Academy University Charter's high school, an expansion that will include a gym, a cafe with WiFi, and a college resource center open to all the city's students. The expansion of LEAP's S.T.E.M. High School, which specializes in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, will help the city's largest charter school network continue to grow, said LEAP founder Gloria Bonilla-Santiago.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN LEAP Academy University Charter, which enrolls about 1,300 students in three schools, is looking to acquire Camden's historic Wilson building to expand its footprint in the city. LEAP is seeking the New Jersey Economic Development Authority's backing of a loan to purchase the historic building at 130 North Broadway adjacent to its campus, according to a legal notice posted by the EDA. The EDA bond would not exceed $10 million for the 73,000-square-foot building and will be voted on at a hearing April 8. LEAP already has a lower school (K-6)
NEWS
June 20, 1987 | By Mark de la Vina, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Hispanic women in Camden County, a bill awaiting action in the state legislature could represent a new beginning. Some of those women, along with leaders of the Hispanic community and local politicians, were among 40 people who converged on Camden City Hall yesterday at noon to push for passage of the Hispanic Women's Resource Centers Act. The act, awaiting action in both the state Senate and Assembly, would provide $400,000 for two Hispanic...
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | By Michael Peck, Special to The Inquirer
Today they are teachers and social workers. Tomorrow they may be leaders on Wall Street and in academia. Twenty-five Hispanic women from throughout the state - including six from South Jersey - are being equipped to become leaders in business, government and higher education at the Hispanic Women Leadership Institute. Gloria Bonilla-Santiago, the institute's director and a Cherry Hill resident, said the college-educated women chosen for the nine-week program, which began Sept.
NEWS
November 28, 1993 | By Karin Braedt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1987, when Miriam Medina Miller first attended the Hispanic Women Leadership Institute at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, she outlined an idea she had and projected it as a course requirement. Her dream was to open a day-care center that would cater to the Hispanic community - one that would be bilingual, be open at night, serve hot meals and, besides the usual arts and crafts, focus on education - particularly science and math. On Monday, Miller, 36, a mother of three, stood in a refurbished firehouse in Lawnside while yellow and green balloons floated around her. "The greatest thing has happened to me today," Miller told the crowd of people, including Mayor Mark Bryant, who attended the inauguration of the Beneath the Tree day-care center at Warwick Road and Hodges Avenue.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students in New Jersey charter schools show greater learning gains, on average, than those in comparable traditional public schools, a study released Tuesday by a Stanford University research center shows. While the report by the Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO) was positive for charters statewide, Camden's charter schools overall did not share in the good news. The study said comparable students in the public schools from which Camden's charter students are drawn showed greater gains in reading ability on state tests than students in the charters and about the same gains in math as the city's charters.
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Students in New Jersey charter schools show greater learning gains, on average, than those in comparable traditional public schools, a study released Tuesday by a Stanford University research center shows. While the report by the Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO) was positive for charters statewide, Camden's charter schools overall did not share in the good news. The study said comparable students in the public schools from which Camden's charter students are drawn showed greater gains in reading ability on state tests than students in the charters and about the same gains in math as the city's charters.
NEWS
February 24, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The board of trustees of Camden's LEAP Academy University Charter School is conducting a review of the process by which its executive chef got a $24,000 raise last year. Chef Michele Pastorello is the boyfriend of LEAP's founder and board chairwoman, Gloria Bonilla-Santiago, and, as The Inquirer reported this week, his base salary was bumped up to $95,000 as part of a new food-service contract. That is more than double what chefs at schools in the area typically earn. A school spokesman said Bonilla-Santiago had recused herself from any votes pertaining to the food-service contract.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Camden's largest charter network again is expanding its footprint: After purchasing a 1920s skyscraper for additional classroom space, it now is establishing an endowment for early-childhood education and college readiness, to the tune of $3 million. LEAP Academy University Charter purchased the nine-story Wilson Building in January and, on Tuesday, secured a bond not to exceed $10 million to complete renovations in the space, built for office and retail tenants. On Wednesday, officials gathered again, this time to celebrate receiving a $1.5 million matching grant.
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NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
LEAP Academy University Charter School in Camden is touting an unusual number this spring: Its seniors sent more than 5,000 college applications - an average of more than 45 per student. Nationally and regionally, most students apply to four to six colleges. South Jersey school counselors say they rarely see as many as 20 or 25. LEAP administrators describe the application process as a way to combat negative perceptions of Camden, set high expectations, and expose students to as many opportunities as possible.
NEWS
December 2, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Work is to begin Monday to transform Camden's historic Wilson Building on North Broadway into an outpost for LEAP Academy University Charter's high school, an expansion that will include a gym, a cafe with WiFi, and a college resource center open to all the city's students. The expansion of LEAP's S.T.E.M. High School, which specializes in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, will help the city's largest charter school network continue to grow, said LEAP founder Gloria Bonilla-Santiago.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Camden's largest charter network again is expanding its footprint: After purchasing a 1920s skyscraper for additional classroom space, it now is establishing an endowment for early-childhood education and college readiness, to the tune of $3 million. LEAP Academy University Charter purchased the nine-story Wilson Building in January and, on Tuesday, secured a bond not to exceed $10 million to complete renovations in the space, built for office and retail tenants. On Wednesday, officials gathered again, this time to celebrate receiving a $1.5 million matching grant.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN LEAP Academy University Charter, which enrolls about 1,300 students in three schools, is looking to acquire Camden's historic Wilson building to expand its footprint in the city. LEAP is seeking the New Jersey Economic Development Authority's backing of a loan to purchase the historic building at 130 North Broadway adjacent to its campus, according to a legal notice posted by the EDA. The EDA bond would not exceed $10 million for the 73,000-square-foot building and will be voted on at a hearing April 8. LEAP already has a lower school (K-6)
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN The schoolchildren, most younger than 10, waited with little feet dangling off the folding chairs in a bright auditorium as they listened for their names. Then, one by one, they came forward and reached out tiny hands to accept their ticket to college. "The sooner the better," said Lamont Young, holding two silver "congratulations" balloons for his 7-year-old daughter, Ashriel, who will receive a scholarship to Rutgers University if she continues on a successful academic path.
NEWS
February 24, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The board of trustees of Camden's LEAP Academy University Charter School is conducting a review of the process by which its executive chef got a $24,000 raise last year. Chef Michele Pastorello is the boyfriend of LEAP's founder and board chairwoman, Gloria Bonilla-Santiago, and, as The Inquirer reported this week, his base salary was bumped up to $95,000 as part of a new food-service contract. That is more than double what chefs at schools in the area typically earn. A school spokesman said Bonilla-Santiago had recused herself from any votes pertaining to the food-service contract.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trustees of the LEAP Academy University Charter School heard an outpouring of praise from parents Tuesday for the difference the Camden charter has made in the lives of children enrolled there, despite questions raised this week about a $24,000 raise for the school's executive chef. The chef is the boyfriend of the school's founder and board chairwoman, Gloria Bonilla-Santiago, The Inquirer reported Monday. The raise took his base salary to $95,000, about double what many teachers at the school make as well as what food-service directors in school districts make.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students in New Jersey charter schools show greater learning gains, on average, than those in comparable traditional public schools, a study released Tuesday by a Stanford University research center shows. While the report by the Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO) was positive for charters statewide, Camden's charter schools overall did not share in the good news. The study said comparable students in the public schools from which Camden's charter students are drawn showed greater gains in reading ability on state tests than students in the charters and about the same gains in math as the city's charters.
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Students in New Jersey charter schools show greater learning gains, on average, than those in comparable traditional public schools, a study released Tuesday by a Stanford University research center shows. While the report by the Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO) was positive for charters statewide, Camden's charter schools overall did not share in the good news. The study said comparable students in the public schools from which Camden's charter students are drawn showed greater gains in reading ability on state tests than students in the charters and about the same gains in math as the city's charters.
NEWS
May 27, 2009 | By David O'Reilly and Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Across the political spectrum, Latinos in the region used the words historic and landmark yesterday to describe President Obama's nomination of Judge Sonia Sotomayor to the U.S. Supreme Court. "I can relax and die happy," exclaimed Nelson Diaz, a former administrative judge of the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas. Like Diaz, several said the nomination marked the overdue entry of Latinos into the uppermost tier of public life. "I think it is completely fair to analogize it to the appointment of Thurgood Marshall" as the first African American Supreme Court justice, said Kenneth Trujillo, former city solicitor for Philadelphia.
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