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Gloria Estefan

NEWS
September 13, 1996 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services, the New York Daily News and New York Post contributed to this report
We hate to suggest there's some kind of Core-States Center curse at work here. But almost every act that's played or scheduled to play the arena has come to no good. Consider: Oasis, the hot British pop band that christened the new venue Sept. 2, abruptly canceled the rest of its U.S. tour yesterday, indicating the quarrelsome group may have broken up for good. Gloria Estefan, who was to perform for a sold-out crowd at the CoreStates Center this evening, canceled her gig late last night.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1994 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
When he sings these days, he can seem like the Chairman of the Bored. He'll turn 79 on Dec. 12, and his voice is a whisper of what it used to be. His "duets" are performed technologically, without a second of personal interaction. But, hey, we're still talking Frank Sinatra here. After last week's release of his Duets II CD, "the best pop singer who ever lived" ambles onto the TV screen tomorrow night for an hour of long- distance harmonizing with some big stars.
NEWS
November 2, 1993 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
DUETS Frank Sinatra (Capitol) 1/2 We should all carry ourselves as well in our septuagenarian years as the Chairman of the Board does here, on his first new studio album in 10 years. In a hip homecoming to Capitol, the label that put out his greatest recordings of the late 1950s and '60s, Sinatra used this occasion to redo some of his classic hits using traditionally flashy, big-band arrangements and a modern twist. Each of 13 tracks features the vocal support of a contemporary super-act - from Luther Vandross to Kenny G, Barbra Streisand to U2's Bono.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributors to this report include the Associated Press, Reuters, the Washington Post and USA Today
Gloria Estefan, 32, walked down the steps of a private jet yesterday to greet fans welcoming her back to Miami. She was released from a Manhattan hospital earlier, 13 days after surgery to repair a broken back resulting from a highway accident in Scranton last month. "It's great to be home," the pop star said. Before leaving New York, the singer said: "This has been one, if not the most difficult thing I've had to go through in my life. But I'm thankful for the miracle of being alive.
LIVING
April 4, 1996 | By W. Speers This story contains material from the Associated Press, New York Post and New York Daily News
Gloria Estefan's son has been expelled from an exclusive Miami school for prank-pulling. Nayib Estefan, 15, was nabbed phoning parents of another student and impersonating a faculty member at Gulliver Prep. He was caught by caller ID. His father, Emilio, said the boy taunted the parents by telling them their son was in trouble. But Emilio denied a claim by the tab, Globe, that Nayib told other parents that their daughters were promiscuous and their sons were gay. Nayib now attends South Miami High part-time.
NEWS
October 16, 1998 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
What's it take to be a diva nowadays? Webster's defines a diva as the leading female singer in an opera or concert organization, and suggests she is often a "prima donna," plagued with a difficult temper. For decades, the tempestuous Maria Callas was synonomous with the term. Today, we're more accustomed to hearing the word applied to a pop superstar - someone with a high-powered voice, personality-plus and (hopefully) a unique take on the world. And yeah, a diva also enjoys a huge claque of devotees, many of whom could be convinced to follow her off a cliff.
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
Come the last week of January, you'll find me where I always am during Super Bowl week. In the Super Bowl host city. For the 10th consecutive year. Without a game ticket. This is not a bad thing. I'm a fan of the game's peripherals, not the game itself. I go to the Super Bowl the way Libby Gelman-Waxner, Premiere magazine's mall multiplex maven, goes to the movies: to assess the accessories. The team owners' wives' shoes . . . the gold that hangs on current and former players like 22-karat free weights . . . the coiffures on the broadcasters, both male and female . . . the incredible nail sculptures that stab the air like public art. With Miami as the host city this year, there is no reason for me to linger at home in frigid Philadelphia when I can bask in 80-degree warmth that will be distributed equally among fans and non-fans.
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | by Robert Dominguez, Special to the Daily News
Call it Grammy's version of the Not-Ready-for-Prime-Time Players. Forced to take a back seat to the more mainstream music forms of pop, rock and R&B during the live Grammy gala, nominees in secondary categories like blues, Latin, jazz and gospel often settle for receiving their awards during an afternoon "pre-tel" (pre-telecast). Taped in an empty auditorium, the footage of winners grasping their gilded Gramophones is later inserted into the live show as freeze-frames, sometimes as "bumpers" before and after commercial breaks.
LIVING
September 25, 1996 | By W. Speers This story contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, New York Daily News and Star
Clint Eastwood flinched first and settled a lawsuit yesterday with ex-live-in Sondra Locke minutes before a jury was to render a verdict in her favor. Neither side was talking how much, but her lawyer said it was a straight cash deal with no future considerations. Locke had sought $2.5 mil for Eastwood's alleged sabotaging of her directing career. A juror said damages were discussed from $15,000 to $10 mil. The lawsuit was over a movie deal he supposedly brokered for her at Warner Bros.
NEWS
August 2, 2000 | by Catherine Lucey, Daily News Staff Writer
SO, DOES HE HAVE a special someone? Can he swivel his hips like Ricky Martin? Could he unbutton his shirt, just a little? Women across America want cutie-pie George P. Bush to answer these questions - and more! But the Latino heartthrob didn't indulge us yesterday. No, George P. practically ran off stage after speaking at the GOP Youth Caucus Rally. He didn't take questions like the other speakers. And it's not quite the same asking Trent Lott about his sex life.
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