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Gloria Estefan

NEWS
April 5, 1996 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
Want to catch Sting's concert this summer when it swings into Philadelphia? Plan on getting seats for Gloria Estefan's appearance? We'd love to tell you when and where the two are appearing - but that info's being held in a sealed vault somewhere in Colorado. Or so it seems. The secrets, however, will be revealed during Friday night cable-casts over VH1, when the station also gives viewers across the nation the first shot at great seats for both tours. Watch "VH1 Tickets First: Sting" tonight from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., and "VH1 Tickets First: Gloria Estefan" next Friday during the same hours and you'll hear tour details for each performer and be given a special toll-free number to call for what the station terms "choice seats.
LIVING
April 4, 1996 | By W. Speers This story contains material from the Associated Press, New York Post and New York Daily News
Gloria Estefan's son has been expelled from an exclusive Miami school for prank-pulling. Nayib Estefan, 15, was nabbed phoning parents of another student and impersonating a faculty member at Gulliver Prep. He was caught by caller ID. His father, Emilio, said the boy taunted the parents by telling them their son was in trouble. But Emilio denied a claim by the tab, Globe, that Nayib told other parents that their daughters were promiscuous and their sons were gay. Nayib now attends South Miami High part-time.
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
Come the last week of January, you'll find me where I always am during Super Bowl week. In the Super Bowl host city. For the 10th consecutive year. Without a game ticket. This is not a bad thing. I'm a fan of the game's peripherals, not the game itself. I go to the Super Bowl the way Libby Gelman-Waxner, Premiere magazine's mall multiplex maven, goes to the movies: to assess the accessories. The team owners' wives' shoes . . . the gold that hangs on current and former players like 22-karat free weights . . . the coiffures on the broadcasters, both male and female . . . the incredible nail sculptures that stab the air like public art. With Miami as the host city this year, there is no reason for me to linger at home in frigid Philadelphia when I can bask in 80-degree warmth that will be distributed equally among fans and non-fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1994 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
When he sings these days, he can seem like the Chairman of the Bored. He'll turn 79 on Dec. 12, and his voice is a whisper of what it used to be. His "duets" are performed technologically, without a second of personal interaction. But, hey, we're still talking Frank Sinatra here. After last week's release of his Duets II CD, "the best pop singer who ever lived" ambles onto the TV screen tomorrow night for an hour of long- distance harmonizing with some big stars.
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | by Robert Dominguez, Special to the Daily News
Call it Grammy's version of the Not-Ready-for-Prime-Time Players. Forced to take a back seat to the more mainstream music forms of pop, rock and R&B during the live Grammy gala, nominees in secondary categories like blues, Latin, jazz and gospel often settle for receiving their awards during an afternoon "pre-tel" (pre-telecast). Taped in an empty auditorium, the footage of winners grasping their gilded Gramophones is later inserted into the live show as freeze-frames, sometimes as "bumpers" before and after commercial breaks.
NEWS
November 2, 1993 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
DUETS Frank Sinatra (Capitol) 1/2 We should all carry ourselves as well in our septuagenarian years as the Chairman of the Board does here, on his first new studio album in 10 years. In a hip homecoming to Capitol, the label that put out his greatest recordings of the late 1950s and '60s, Sinatra used this occasion to redo some of his classic hits using traditionally flashy, big-band arrangements and a modern twist. Each of 13 tracks features the vocal support of a contemporary super-act - from Luther Vandross to Kenny G, Barbra Streisand to U2's Bono.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1993 | By Enrique Fernandez, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
"I couldn't deal with looking like that all the time," says Gloria Estefan about the heavily styled 1940s Latin look she wore in the cover art and videos for her new Mi Tierra album. Estefan is standing in her Star Island kitchen wearing shorts and a tank top, an outfit that shows how different her exercise-sculpted body is from the languid shape of Latin sirens of earlier decades. Unlike those mysterious sirens, Estefan is straightforward and down to earth. In other words, American.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1993 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A small company with a sound invention is making it big among the stars. Future Sonics Inc., of Newtown, has developed a high-fidelity sound monitoring system that is being used by Gloria Estefan, Michael Bolton, Phil Collins and other big-name entertainers. Worn inside the ear, the customized miniature speakers, called Ear Monitors, let performers hear themselves during a live performance without the clutter of surrounding noise. "They eliminate the feedback and ear-damaging frequencies that all performers are subject to," said Marty Garcia, 38, founder and president of Future Sonics and inventor of Ear Monitors.
NEWS
June 2, 1992 | By K. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This report includes information from the Associated Press, New York Daily News, Knight-Ridder News Service and USA Today
You don't think Cordell Jackson was really rockin' in that beer commercial? She'll show ya. By now, you must've seen the Budweiser spot. Rocker Brian Setzer (of the Stray Cats) is sound-checking before a gig when, from out of nowhere, you hear a strong female voice: "Crunch that last chord! Here, I'll show ya. " And rock she does. Blue-tinged bouffant, Far Side glasses, Hagstrom Condor guitar and all, Jackson, 68, calls herself the Rockin' Granny. This Mississippi-born grandmother of 11 cut her first record in 1947, started her own label, Moon Records, in the '50s, and is regarded by some in the business as one of rock's midwives.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | By Kevin L. Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tuesday night at the Spectrum, Gloria Estefan got a lot of gifts. She was making her first trip to town after her horrifying bus accident in the Poconos in March 1990, and the fans in the nearly packed house wanted to let her know how much they'd missed her. The Gloriaholics were in full force. Estefan received enough flowers to fund the retirement of several florists, some huge stuffed animals, a few Cuban-flag T-shirts and other items, including at least one pair of men's underwear, a tradition at her shows.
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