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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Civil War historian Shelby Foote says that the suicidal charge on the Confederate position at Fort Wagner on July 18, 1863, by the black soldiers in the 54th Massachusetts Regiment had little military value but enormous meaning. "It has relevance today because it's yet another instance of a black man proving what white man never had to prove," Foote said. "They took a giant step forward that day. " But as Edward Zwick's magnificent Glory so movingly reminds us, the price was terribly high.
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
An unidentified youngster is lost in a sea of flags during the Pledge of Allegiance at the opening of last night's session of the Republican National Convention in Houston, Texas.
NEWS
June 17, 2000
Last time the Phillies won the World Series - the only time, we're sorry to remind you - was in 1980. Twenty years ago. Seems like only yesterday, does it? Not to anyone under, say, 25, it doesn't. More than an entire generation has grown up aware only tangentially - from what Dad's told them or what they've read in the papers - that a Phillies team was ever good enough to go all the way. The sorry performance of the current Phillies does cast a shadow on this weekend's 20th-anniversary festivities commemorating That Championship Season.
SPORTS
December 6, 1997 | By Mel Greenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rage's renewed progress came to a stop here last night as the Glory romped to an 88-73 victory at Morehouse Olympic Arena. It was the first time in four meetings this season that player-coach Teresa Edwards' squad defeated the Rage (7-11), who had won their last two games. Atlanta (9-9), which reached .500 for the first time this season, is beginning to play like the title contender it was expected to be because of the strength of its post players. That was apparent to the crowd of 3,575 who saw the Glory grab their sixth victory in their last seven games.
NEWS
January 20, 2003
TO WHAT end is cloning? As do many people, I agree with Ms. Christine Flowers' Jan. 2 op-ed article ("I Love You Just the Way . . . I Am") regarding cloning humans. Even if every human being alive today were given the power to change his or her appearance, the human race would still be as versatile and beautiful as it is today. Jews and Christians believe that man was created in God's image. Muslims believe God created mankind in various colors, shapes and sizes, speaking a myriad of languages as testimony to his artistry and power.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2002 | Daily News Staff Report
A NY SISTAH GIRL knows that hair care is at the root of many an issue for some black folks. "The Tenderheaded Diaries" will explore this territory at the Painted Bride beginning tomorrow. The show will include skits on such familiar topics as "The Art of Greasing the Scalp" as well as video diaries of real people telling "unbeweavable" hair stories. The production, which premiered in Philly in December, was inspired by the book, "Tenderheaded: A Comb-Bending Collection of Hair Stories" by Juliette Harris and Pamela Johnson, (Pocket Books, $14)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Glory, an account of the first black regiment organized to fight the Confederacy, is a splendidly cast film that examines two kinds of courage. The volunteers needed the valor to face the enemy and the strength to confront the massive prejudice they encountered behind their own lines. They acquitted themselves nobly on both counts. At once moving and inspiring, the movie is Hollywood's finest - and most accurate - look at the war. "Glory" at the Free Library of Philadelphia, Central Library, Montgomery Auditorium, Logan Square, at 2 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
April 15, 1991 | By Bill Doherty, Special to The Inquirer
Ridley senior defenseman Steve Naumowich has proved Sean Ralph wrong. Ralph, a former standout Ridley goalie, was Naumowich's youth-lacrosse coach back in sixth grade. "At the time, everybody wanted to be attackmen or midfielders," Naumowich said. "They wanted to score the goals, get all the glory. "Coach Ralph was looking for some people to make the switch to defense. I remember him telling us that defensemen never get their names in the paper, never get any attention.
SPORTS
December 13, 1997 | By Mel Greenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dawn Staley was back in the neighborhood last night and played as if she had never left. The Rage point guard had a game-high 28 points, including six three-pointers, and her squad got back on the winning side with an 84-71 victory over Atlanta at the new Apollo on Temple's campus. Staley scored 10 of the last 11 points. "I'm scoring more because Lisa told me to be more aggressive," Staley said, referring to coach Lisa Boyer. The Apollo isn't far from Dobbins Tech, where Staley played her high school ball, or the North Philadelphia playground courts where she honed her game against the guys.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Malena" is like an Italian version of "Hope and Glory," a WWII memoir, seen through the eyes of a boy, with lots and lots of girl-watching. In "Malena," the boy is Renato Amoroso (Giuseppe Sulfaro) a Sicilian who remembers the outbreak of WWII because it happened to coincide with something even more momentous - his first bicycle. He wants to show the bike to his teen-age friends, but they are distracted by something more compelling - the daily stroll of Malena, lonely bride of an Italian soldier away at the front.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Five years ago, almost exactly to this date, fair-haired rapper Asher Roth - the toast of Morrisville and West Chester University - topped the charts when his major-label debut, Asleep in the Bread Aisle , soared to No. 1 on iTunes upon release. Then 23, a hot, fair-haired MC, a child of Pennsylvania's middle class, Roth struck gold on the back of his booze-and-weed anthem "I Love College" and its dedication to the high life and higher education. Heady days, for sure; a level of success Roth seeks to revisit with his official sophomore full-length, RetroHash , its singles ("Fast Lane" and "Tangerine Girl")
SPORTS
March 29, 2014 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
One day they will hold a ceremony for each and every one of them at Citizens Bank Park. A plaque with their likenesses, names, and career accomplishments will be attached to the brick wall in center field that is reserved for only the most revered of Phillies. They will receive a standing ovation and be asked to make a speech, and it will be a special night with their former teammates and other Phillies greats by their side. That's not just a forecast for the futures of Ryan Howard, Chase Utley, Jimmy Rollins, Carlos Ruiz, and Cole Hamels.
SPORTS
February 26, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
THE GOOD THING is that every Olympic year when a bunch of Philadelphia bigwigs start spouting about what a great host that their city would make, we know they are just talking out of the sides of their necks for a publicity hit. It's not that Philadelphia could not pull it off; rather, the Olympic Games - Winter or Summer - simply are not worth the amount of costs, resources and inconveniences that come with them. Russia poured a record $51 billion into the just-completed 2014 Sochi Winter Games, but what did it really get out of them?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
At 78, Albert "Tootie" Heath, youngest of Philly's jazz family the Heath Brothers, has a long career as a drummer that includes stints for John Coltrane, Red Garland, Nina Simone, and Herbie Hancock (all in 1957, Tootie's first year of label sessions!), to say nothing of work with Wes Montgomery, Anthony Braxton, the Modern Jazz Quartet, his saxophonist brother Jimmy, and double-bassist Percy Heath. The mighty yet sublime hard-bop acolyte might preen over his glorious albums as a bandleader, albums such as the African diaspora-inspired Kawaida of 1969 and 1973's Kwanza . He could point with pride to more recent work, such as his somber, solo drum workout, The Offering (1998)
SPORTS
January 27, 2014 | By BILLY HULL, For the Daily News
HONOLULU - LeSean McCoy and DeSean Jackson won't line up against each other on the field during tomorrow's NFL Pro Bowl at Aloha Stadium. But the two Eagles stars will be on opposite sidelines, however, and there's plenty of friendly competition going on between the two this week. "I've got to get it," McCoy said this week. "Even if we ain't teammates, I've got to get it, man. " The four guys representing the Eagles at this weekend's Pro Bowl are divided up evenly, with guard Evan Mathis joining McCoy, the NFL's leading rusher, on Jerry Rice's team, while Jackson and quarterback Nick Foles will play for Deion Sanders' team after the two Hall of Famers drafted their squads on Tuesday and Wednesday.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Infusions faced off with fusion and lobster bisque battled broccoli rabe on Broad Street on Saturday as hundreds of cooking hopefuls turned out to audition for Season 5 of MasterChef , the culinary reality television show. Tupperware in tow at the DoubleTree by Hilton hotel, they were all taking their stab at becoming the next Luca Manfe - that is, the restaurant manager from Astoria, Queens, who won last season's competition, scoring $250,000 and a cookbook deal. "We are looking for passion," said casting director Erika Landin.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
FOR DECADES, Miss America was all about beauty and "perfection," physical and otherwise. But like so much about the venerable competition, this has changed. Ever since Alabama's Heather Whitestone, who was rendered deaf after a childhood illness, was crowned Miss America 1995, disabilities have not been a hurdle to participation in the pageant at any level, local, state or national. As a matter of fact, in the wake of Whitestone's crowning, some cynical members of the media began referring to the "gimp factor" as part of the selection process.
NEWS
September 10, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
ERNEST SAXON remembers the good old days when he could leave his house on Park Avenue in Fern Rock and saunter a couple of blocks to Broad Street and Olney Avenue for some breakfast and a cup of coffee in the morning. But those days, says Saxon, 72, are long gone. "Around the '80s was the transition, because the whole neighborhood at that time started to change," said Saxon, who bought his house near Nedro Avenue in 1969. "I've seen the transition from being the second African-American family that moved on our block to watching the whole area change, and watching the whole area's economic status change.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Dana Milbank
Copies of This Town , my friend and former Post colleague Mark Leibovich's soon-to-be released book about Washington culture, have begun to dribble out, and people in the capital are reacting by sorting out who came out worst. There's presidential friend and White House aide Valerie Jarrett, whose colleagues felt compelled to draft a memo, "The Magic of Valerie," defending her reputation. It included the bullet point "Valerie is someone here who other people inside the building know they can trust.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Beth Kephart
The day before there'd been a storm, and so the Wissahickon Creek ran freckled, like the back of a fawn. It was 51 degrees, the 13th of May, early, but not dawn. Fish jumped. Frogs demurred. A garden-variety Canada goose was jonesing for a show. If there were turtles on the backs of rocks, they achieved perfect incognito, and every bird that rustled was (it seemed) a chubby-bellied robin, until my eyes saw past the secrets of the trees. A chimney swift. A pair of fish crows. An operatic gray catbird wearing a very sweet toupee.
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