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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Civil War historian Shelby Foote says that the suicidal charge on the Confederate position at Fort Wagner on July 18, 1863, by the black soldiers in the 54th Massachusetts Regiment had little military value but enormous meaning. "It has relevance today because it's yet another instance of a black man proving what white man never had to prove," Foote said. "They took a giant step forward that day. " But as Edward Zwick's magnificent Glory so movingly reminds us, the price was terribly high.
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
An unidentified youngster is lost in a sea of flags during the Pledge of Allegiance at the opening of last night's session of the Republican National Convention in Houston, Texas.
NEWS
June 17, 2000
Last time the Phillies won the World Series - the only time, we're sorry to remind you - was in 1980. Twenty years ago. Seems like only yesterday, does it? Not to anyone under, say, 25, it doesn't. More than an entire generation has grown up aware only tangentially - from what Dad's told them or what they've read in the papers - that a Phillies team was ever good enough to go all the way. The sorry performance of the current Phillies does cast a shadow on this weekend's 20th-anniversary festivities commemorating That Championship Season.
SPORTS
December 6, 1997 | By Mel Greenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rage's renewed progress came to a stop here last night as the Glory romped to an 88-73 victory at Morehouse Olympic Arena. It was the first time in four meetings this season that player-coach Teresa Edwards' squad defeated the Rage (7-11), who had won their last two games. Atlanta (9-9), which reached .500 for the first time this season, is beginning to play like the title contender it was expected to be because of the strength of its post players. That was apparent to the crowd of 3,575 who saw the Glory grab their sixth victory in their last seven games.
NEWS
January 20, 2003
TO WHAT end is cloning? As do many people, I agree with Ms. Christine Flowers' Jan. 2 op-ed article ("I Love You Just the Way . . . I Am") regarding cloning humans. Even if every human being alive today were given the power to change his or her appearance, the human race would still be as versatile and beautiful as it is today. Jews and Christians believe that man was created in God's image. Muslims believe God created mankind in various colors, shapes and sizes, speaking a myriad of languages as testimony to his artistry and power.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2002 | Daily News Staff Report
A NY SISTAH GIRL knows that hair care is at the root of many an issue for some black folks. "The Tenderheaded Diaries" will explore this territory at the Painted Bride beginning tomorrow. The show will include skits on such familiar topics as "The Art of Greasing the Scalp" as well as video diaries of real people telling "unbeweavable" hair stories. The production, which premiered in Philly in December, was inspired by the book, "Tenderheaded: A Comb-Bending Collection of Hair Stories" by Juliette Harris and Pamela Johnson, (Pocket Books, $14)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Glory, an account of the first black regiment organized to fight the Confederacy, is a splendidly cast film that examines two kinds of courage. The volunteers needed the valor to face the enemy and the strength to confront the massive prejudice they encountered behind their own lines. They acquitted themselves nobly on both counts. At once moving and inspiring, the movie is Hollywood's finest - and most accurate - look at the war. "Glory" at the Free Library of Philadelphia, Central Library, Montgomery Auditorium, Logan Square, at 2 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
April 15, 1991 | By Bill Doherty, Special to The Inquirer
Ridley senior defenseman Steve Naumowich has proved Sean Ralph wrong. Ralph, a former standout Ridley goalie, was Naumowich's youth-lacrosse coach back in sixth grade. "At the time, everybody wanted to be attackmen or midfielders," Naumowich said. "They wanted to score the goals, get all the glory. "Coach Ralph was looking for some people to make the switch to defense. I remember him telling us that defensemen never get their names in the paper, never get any attention.
SPORTS
December 13, 1997 | By Mel Greenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dawn Staley was back in the neighborhood last night and played as if she had never left. The Rage point guard had a game-high 28 points, including six three-pointers, and her squad got back on the winning side with an 84-71 victory over Atlanta at the new Apollo on Temple's campus. Staley scored 10 of the last 11 points. "I'm scoring more because Lisa told me to be more aggressive," Staley said, referring to coach Lisa Boyer. The Apollo isn't far from Dobbins Tech, where Staley played her high school ball, or the North Philadelphia playground courts where she honed her game against the guys.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Malena" is like an Italian version of "Hope and Glory," a WWII memoir, seen through the eyes of a boy, with lots and lots of girl-watching. In "Malena," the boy is Renato Amoroso (Giuseppe Sulfaro) a Sicilian who remembers the outbreak of WWII because it happened to coincide with something even more momentous - his first bicycle. He wants to show the bike to his teen-age friends, but they are distracted by something more compelling - the daily stroll of Malena, lonely bride of an Italian soldier away at the front.
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NEWS
January 8, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Donna Mae Stemmer was a pistol. You can see it in each faded Polaroid and snazzy outfit of hers on display at Philly AIDS Thrift on South Fifth Street and Philly AIDS Thrift Giovanni's Room at 12th and Pine. In all of them, no matter the year, there's a mischievous glint in her eye and a smile playing on her lips. "She might have come out a bit less toward the end of her life, but she was still decked out," says friend Michael Byrne. The 82-year-old transgender trailblazer, who died in June at her Pennsauken home, was a University of Pennsylvania grad with a law degree from Temple who worked as a lawyer and served in the U.S. Army for more than 30 years, fighting in Korea, reaching the rank of lieutenant colonel, and being decorated 25 times, including a Distinguished Service Award in 2008.
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer and Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writers
The 365 voices from parishes in Newark, Elizabeth, and Linden, N.J., were triumphant as they marched across the Ben Franklin Bridge on Saturday, eager to arrive for the papal festivities. "Glory! Glory! Glory!" the group sang, accompanied by guitars and drums, as the crowds parted to let them pass. The 1.8-mile span was like a fall block party - thousands of joggers, in-line skaters, cyclists, dog walkers, and families pushing strollers - and then there were the faithful headed to see Pope Francis in Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 21, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Where can a small, formerly all-women's Catholic college beat - well, actually trounce - an Ivy League university in its inaugural outing? On the football field. The sprint football field, that is. In its first game ever, Chestnut Hill College, which went coed in 2003, beat Princeton, 48-13, Saturday at a field in Plymouth Meeting. Sprint football is played the same as the regular version, except that players can't weigh more than 172 pounds, leading to faster action in which even a trim 5-foot-3 Raevon Floyd-Bennett could land a spectacular tackle for the Griffins.
NEWS
September 3, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the late 2000s, Robert B. Hanna and Bill Lammey became the last winners of the legendary Merchantville Cup. Legendary among the only four golfers who competed for it, a couple of times a year, by going out in a friendly foursome to lay claim to the honor that they had devised for themselves. "It was only for the four guys," Kristin Abbe, Mr. Hanna's daughter, said. "More for the bragging rights. " Golf for fun. "That's the kind of guy my father was," she said. On Saturday, Aug. 29, Mr. Hanna, 73, of Merchantville, owner of the Philadelphia Fruit Market there from 1982 until the late 2000s, died of pancreatic cancer at ManorCare Health Services in Sewell.
SPORTS
September 3, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank Wilczynski still remembers making those handoffs to Frank Hales and feathering those passes to Justin Stippick. "Like it was yesterday," Wilczynski said of the 2003 football season. In those days, Wilczynski was Overbrook's star senior quarterback. Now, he's the Rams' head coach. As a player, Wilczynski was part of Overbrook's last run of football glory. He led his last high school team to the South Jersey Group 2 final. The Rams lost, 17-12, to a West Deptford team led by Boston College-bound Tom Walls and featuring Penn State-bound Anthony Scirrotto and Rutgers-bound Kordell Young.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jon Stewart, who redefined political satire and energized a generation of activists during his 16 years, 2,676 episodes, and 20 Emmy awards as host of The Daily Show on Comedy Central, ended his tenure Thursday. He had help from a slew of visiting friends and former colleagues, including Samantha Bee, Lewis Black, Steve Carell, Mo Rocca, Rob Corddry, and Olivia Munn. "This show isn't ending. We merely are taking a pause in the conversation," Stewart, 52, said at the end of the night.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
If any of the four productions in Vulcan Lyric's first summer festival claims a solid place on the Philadelphia landscape, it's Glory Denied , a tough, uncompromising piece by Tom Cipullo that seemed to light a fire under the cast in an effective if bare-bones presentation Tuesday in the Prince Theater's black-box space. Though the opera tells the true story of Col. Jim Thompson - the longest-held prisoner of war in American history, imprisoned in Vietnam from 1964 to 1973 - this is no docu-opera: While sketching the general outlines of Thompson's story, Glory Denied embraces the artificiality of the medium in ways that get at the emotional truth of the situation as nothing else can. Obviously, it's not a tune-inspiring story.
SPORTS
July 22, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
This is going to be something to see and that is seldom said around here anymore. For a five-year span, Citizens Bank Park trumped the Jersey Shore, the Poconos and every other site in our area as the place to be in the searing heat of summer. From the parking lot tailgates to the congested strolls out on Ashburn Alley, the ballpark was a happening as much as it was a place for a great baseball game. That is all gone now. Only the diehards and those with free or deeply discounted tickets plop into the blue seats to watch a team that has trouble hitting, pitching and fielding most nights.
SPORTS
June 9, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
ELMONT, N.Y. - Racetrack lifers, those who knew Bob Baffert well enough to wander inside Barn 1 at Belmont Park, congregated in a corner as American Pharoah walked around the shed row. One guy held Baffert's coffee while the trainer signed a Belmont Stakes program for him. Out on Hempstead Turnpike, just over a fence, traffic spilled by, past a Wendy's and a Subway across the street, which seemed a world away. Inside the fence, there was an air of contentment. Why would the glow wear off?
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
After the Decemberists played the driving, lyrically ornate "The Infanta" at the Academy of Music on Tuesday night, singer Colin Meloy made a confession. The song, he told the audience, "serves no practical purpose whatsoever. " It was a strange moment, not because he was wrong, but because the issue of practicality is not one that seems to weigh heavily on the band's collective conscience. Over the last 15 years, the quintet from Portland, Ore., augmented on stage by singers Kelly Hogan and Nora O'Connor, has built a devoted, ever-growing fan base with elaborate, hyperliterary folk tunes - a cross between a medieval history seminar and an advanced vocabulary quiz.
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