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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Civil War historian Shelby Foote says that the suicidal charge on the Confederate position at Fort Wagner on July 18, 1863, by the black soldiers in the 54th Massachusetts Regiment had little military value but enormous meaning. "It has relevance today because it's yet another instance of a black man proving what white man never had to prove," Foote said. "They took a giant step forward that day. " But as Edward Zwick's magnificent Glory so movingly reminds us, the price was terribly high.
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
An unidentified youngster is lost in a sea of flags during the Pledge of Allegiance at the opening of last night's session of the Republican National Convention in Houston, Texas.
NEWS
June 17, 2000
Last time the Phillies won the World Series - the only time, we're sorry to remind you - was in 1980. Twenty years ago. Seems like only yesterday, does it? Not to anyone under, say, 25, it doesn't. More than an entire generation has grown up aware only tangentially - from what Dad's told them or what they've read in the papers - that a Phillies team was ever good enough to go all the way. The sorry performance of the current Phillies does cast a shadow on this weekend's 20th-anniversary festivities commemorating That Championship Season.
SPORTS
December 6, 1997 | By Mel Greenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rage's renewed progress came to a stop here last night as the Glory romped to an 88-73 victory at Morehouse Olympic Arena. It was the first time in four meetings this season that player-coach Teresa Edwards' squad defeated the Rage (7-11), who had won their last two games. Atlanta (9-9), which reached .500 for the first time this season, is beginning to play like the title contender it was expected to be because of the strength of its post players. That was apparent to the crowd of 3,575 who saw the Glory grab their sixth victory in their last seven games.
NEWS
January 20, 2003
TO WHAT end is cloning? As do many people, I agree with Ms. Christine Flowers' Jan. 2 op-ed article ("I Love You Just the Way . . . I Am") regarding cloning humans. Even if every human being alive today were given the power to change his or her appearance, the human race would still be as versatile and beautiful as it is today. Jews and Christians believe that man was created in God's image. Muslims believe God created mankind in various colors, shapes and sizes, speaking a myriad of languages as testimony to his artistry and power.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2002 | Daily News Staff Report
A NY SISTAH GIRL knows that hair care is at the root of many an issue for some black folks. "The Tenderheaded Diaries" will explore this territory at the Painted Bride beginning tomorrow. The show will include skits on such familiar topics as "The Art of Greasing the Scalp" as well as video diaries of real people telling "unbeweavable" hair stories. The production, which premiered in Philly in December, was inspired by the book, "Tenderheaded: A Comb-Bending Collection of Hair Stories" by Juliette Harris and Pamela Johnson, (Pocket Books, $14)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Glory, an account of the first black regiment organized to fight the Confederacy, is a splendidly cast film that examines two kinds of courage. The volunteers needed the valor to face the enemy and the strength to confront the massive prejudice they encountered behind their own lines. They acquitted themselves nobly on both counts. At once moving and inspiring, the movie is Hollywood's finest - and most accurate - look at the war. "Glory" at the Free Library of Philadelphia, Central Library, Montgomery Auditorium, Logan Square, at 2 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
April 15, 1991 | By Bill Doherty, Special to The Inquirer
Ridley senior defenseman Steve Naumowich has proved Sean Ralph wrong. Ralph, a former standout Ridley goalie, was Naumowich's youth-lacrosse coach back in sixth grade. "At the time, everybody wanted to be attackmen or midfielders," Naumowich said. "They wanted to score the goals, get all the glory. "Coach Ralph was looking for some people to make the switch to defense. I remember him telling us that defensemen never get their names in the paper, never get any attention.
SPORTS
December 13, 1997 | By Mel Greenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dawn Staley was back in the neighborhood last night and played as if she had never left. The Rage point guard had a game-high 28 points, including six three-pointers, and her squad got back on the winning side with an 84-71 victory over Atlanta at the new Apollo on Temple's campus. Staley scored 10 of the last 11 points. "I'm scoring more because Lisa told me to be more aggressive," Staley said, referring to coach Lisa Boyer. The Apollo isn't far from Dobbins Tech, where Staley played her high school ball, or the North Philadelphia playground courts where she honed her game against the guys.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Malena" is like an Italian version of "Hope and Glory," a WWII memoir, seen through the eyes of a boy, with lots and lots of girl-watching. In "Malena," the boy is Renato Amoroso (Giuseppe Sulfaro) a Sicilian who remembers the outbreak of WWII because it happened to coincide with something even more momentous - his first bicycle. He wants to show the bike to his teen-age friends, but they are distracted by something more compelling - the daily stroll of Malena, lonely bride of an Italian soldier away at the front.
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NEWS
September 21, 2016
By Jon Caroulis A man in ancient Rome named Claudius tells members of the Senate he is half-witted, but adds, "I have survived to middle age with half my wits while thousands have died with all of theirs intact. Evidently quality of wits is more important than quantity!" Those words were spoken on one of TV's greatest shows, I, Claudius , a 12-hour BBC miniseries about the first four emperors of Rome that debuted 40 years ago this month. One year later, it appeared on PBS' Masterpiece Theatre and became one of the network's most-watched shows.
SPORTS
August 26, 2016 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
THIS ONE might be the toughest. It's strange to think about. We've sat through how many of these already? The centerfielder, the shortstop, the second baseman, the World Series MVP. Could it really be that the eight-hole hitter was the one to burrow furthest into that part of your mind where the visceral memories go? The Phillies traded Carlos Ruiz to the Dodgers Thursday. They didn't receive much in return; nor were they expected to. Tommy Bergjans is the name. A 23-year-old righty whom the Dodgers drafted in the eighth round in June 2015.
SPORTS
August 26, 2016 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
HERE IS THE difference between becoming Olympic heroes and Olympic dimwits. On Tuesday, the gold medal-winning United States women's gymnastics team was in Manhattan for a taping of the The Tonight Show and just happened to swing by the Richard Rodgers Theatre for prime seats to the Broadway hit Hamilton . On the secondary market, tickets to the high-demand show start at $300 to $500 for the cheapest seats, and reportedly average around...
SPORTS
July 9, 2016 | By Elliott Denman, For The Inquirer
EUGENE, Ore. - Marielle Hall has already made American track and field history. Now she's doubling down on her Olympic ambitions. Hall is bound for Rio de Janeiro after her third-place finish Saturday in the 10,000-meter final at the U.S. Olympic trials. The Haddonfield High and University of Texas alumna now has set her sights on the 5,000 meters. She finished in 31 minutes, 54.77 seconds behind Molly Huddle and Emily Infeld on Saturday at Hayward Field. Hall will be the first African American runner to represent the United States in the Olympic 10,000, "and that's very meaningful to me," she said.
NEWS
June 5, 2016
A Personal History of L.A. Punk By John Doe with Tom DeSavia and Friends Da Capo. 336 pp. $26.99 Reviewed by Tom Wilk The music that emerged from the Los Angeles punk rock scene of the late 1970s and early '80s resisted easy categorization. The aggression of X, the thrash of Black Flag, the pop/rock sounds of the Go-Go's, and the roots-music dynamism of the Blasters reflected the variety of the musical landscape. It's an era skillfully recounted in Under the Big Black Sun: A Personal History of L.A. Punk by John Doe with Tom DeSavia and Friends.
NEWS
May 29, 2016
The Gene An Intimate History By Siddhartha Mukherjee Scribner. 592 pp. $30 Reviewed by Jim Higgins 'Like Pythagoras' triangle, like the cave paintings at Lascaux, like the Pyramids in Giza, like the image of a fragile blue planet seen from outer space, the double helix of DNA is an iconic image, etched permanently into human history and memory," Siddhartha Mukherjee writes in The Gene: An Intimate History...
FOOD
May 27, 2016 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Seasonal spring eating is all about shoots and sprouts. Tomato and cucumber plants may be in the ground, but they are far from bearing fruit. Spring is a season to celebrate green: emerald lettuces, celadon kale, jade green asparagus, tender chartreuse spring peas, and a palette of herbs. The earliest crops in my garden are always the spinach planted last fall, the garlic that sprouts from last year's harvest, and the arugula and cilantro that went to seed and self-sowed all about in bare patches, waiting for the rain and warm weather of May. Asparagus has popped up in gardens and is coming in abundance from South Jersey farms.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
JERSEY SHORE, Pa. - Blake and Gerlinde Trimble lived for nearly 30 years in the Riverdale Mobile Home Park outside this curiously named borough. But four years after they were evicted to make way for the shale-gas boom, they hardly recognize the place. "I'm having some trouble getting my bearings," Blake Trimble, 61, said as the couple wandered through a grassy field where their trailer once stood, identifying traces of raspberries, blueberries, and honeysuckle they had planted. It was their first visit since 2012, when security guards and the state police told residents that after they packed up, they couldn't come back.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Jennifer Childs, longtime artistic director for 1812 Productions, debuts Tuesday night in her self-penned, one-woman show I Will Not Go Gently at Plays & Players Theatre. Childs plays multiple roles in a musical tale of ageism, egoism, comebacks, and rock and roll. Three characters - a podcasting fan-mom, a faded television heroine, and a tech-centric tween - try to grab for glory they may or may not ever have had. These characters all bear some connection to Sierra Mist, an imaginary '70s/'80s female rocker icon whose music and image (Childs says)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
You don't need to visit France to enjoy a good château. Just wander over to Chestnut Street, where the nine-story Crozer Building lords over the 1400 block. Unlike the aristocratic French homes, this is a vertical château, and it was created for a burgeoning American commercial district. Designed by Frank Miles Day & Bro. in the late 1890s for the American Baptist Publication Society, the Crozer Building is one of the earliest tall buildings in Philadelphia. At the time, architects were making the transition from masonry to lighter steel-frame construction.
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