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Gluttony

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NEWS
February 3, 2007 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The predicted ice pellets never pelted. So the coast was clear for the early birds entering the Wachovia Center. And after Round One, the leader with a perhaps unprecedented 112 wings was a man from Clifton Heights. Suddenly, Wing Bowl 15, billed as "Philadelphia vs. the World," tantalized with a prospect as glittery as a Wingette's hair: Somebody local - "Gentleman Jerry" Coughlan - just might win. Incredibly, Philadelphia's Khalil Masso ("The Beast From the Northeast")
SPORTS
February 3, 2013 | By Dan Gross, Daily News Staff Writer
As The Stranger told The Dude in "The Big Lebowski," "Sometimes you eat the bear, and sometimes, well, he eats you. " Jamie "The Bear" McDonald, of Granby, Conn., chomped his way to victory at SportsRadio 94 WIP's Wing Bowl 21 Friday at the Wells Fargo Center. McDonald, 36, devoured 287 wings, five more than the runner-up, South Jersey postman Dave "U.S. Male" Goldstein. The Bear is new to competitive eating, having just started in May. "This is the biggest contest in the world," The Bear said.
NEWS
April 4, 1996 | By Teller
Soon by law all new TVs will carry the V-chip - that cunning little piece of circuitry designed to enable parents (without any attention or effort!) to stop their kids from seeing make-believe violence that an official at the Federal Communications Commission thinks might make them naughty. What a relief. Later this year, Congress will be offering families an even more valuable, worry-saving innovation: the G-chip. The G-chip will plug into the back of a TV and automatically restrict reception of all depictions of gluttony.
NEWS
March 15, 2003 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
The sign at Slack's Hoagie Shack on Snyder Avenue in South Philadelphia reads: "We sell Freedom Fries!" It's become the hot jingo junk-food protest against the contrarian French and their stand on the Iraq crisis. ("They don't got your backs if we go to war," grumbles Slack's manager, Nick Bouvioukes.) But when I first saw the sign, I must admit, the idea seemed as uninspired as a greasy frite. What do the French care if we gorge ourselves with potatoes by another name? Maybe a lot. It turns out that stuffing our faces may be the best revenge.
NEWS
November 9, 2004
LET ME start at the end of Ronnie Polaneczky's "Bush's 'Unity' Plea: Baloney!" column, that 55.2 million voters can't all be wrong. What about the nearly 59 million voters who voted the other way, for President Bush? Can those people all be wrong? In fact, the Democrats have not had a majority of the voters since 1976. (Just so you are aware, a majority is when you have more than 50 percent.) Clinton wasn't able to do it in either of his elections. Yet George Bush I did. So did Reagan (twice)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2004 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The dawn of a new year inevitably comes with resolutions and self-examination, usually with existential questions such as, "Am I a jerk?" The ever-useful Philadelphia Orchestra provided a grid for that sort of thing with its first-ever local performance of Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht's Seven Deadly Sins. Written in 1933, it's a series of songlike episodes from the odyssey of two sisters traveling the United States to earn money in many disreputable ways. Utility value aside, the piece was the dominating presence in an excellent left-of-center program with guest conductor Carlos Kalmar yesterday at Verizon Hall.
NEWS
December 30, 2004 | By Katherine Dowling Schlaerth
"Well, doctor, I'm afraid I've been bad," confided the rotund sextagenarian perched on the exam table. "My husband and I have been doing a lot of eating out since he retired, and watching a whole lot of TV. I guess I'll have to start cooking again, and get my eating under control. " This woman's attitude was a breath of fresh air. Many obese patients come to see their physician with the intention of being prescribed a pill to help them lose weight. Indeed, most of the advertisements in the media promise effortless weight loss, no will power needed.
NEWS
January 21, 2003 | By Mona Charen
Americans are far more at risk from eating too much than from eating too little. In fact, we face an epidemic of obesity. Yet the federal government each year churns out billions of dollars to feed the poor. If that sounds crazy, it is. But it is also a familiar result of a dynamic in American politics. For several centuries - OK, it only feels like several centuries - policymakers have engaged in the following ritual: Liberals identify a "need" and urge that the federal government "do something about it. " In some cases, like aid to the elderly, widows and orphans, these needs are real.
SPORTS
June 27, 2012 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Columnist
In 27 years at The Inquirer, one of my favorite stories I wrote was a profile of El Wingador on the morning of Wing Bowl in 2002. I was at his home at 4 a.m. and followed him through to his crowning as Wing Bowl champion for the third time. I loved that story for two reasons. One, the level of Americana - the things El Wingador said and did that morning before and during the competition were simply priceless. But the second reason is the more important one. There was more than foolishness.
NEWS
September 20, 2007 | By Martin Binks
As the new season of NBC's The Biggest Loser unfolds, ask yourself this: Would I want to watch a loved one who struggles daily with the physical, mental and emotional ramifications of a life-threatening illness treated this way? Capitalizing on obesity, one of the country's fastest-growing epidemics, the program is the latest proof that the sideshow mentality and sensationalistic abuse of reality television have gone too far. Several years ago, when The Real World and Survivor started placing real people in contrived situations with cameras rolling, America sat transfixed as "unscripted" human drama unfolded.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 3, 2013 | By Dan Gross, Daily News Staff Writer
As The Stranger told The Dude in "The Big Lebowski," "Sometimes you eat the bear, and sometimes, well, he eats you. " Jamie "The Bear" McDonald, of Granby, Conn., chomped his way to victory at SportsRadio 94 WIP's Wing Bowl 21 Friday at the Wells Fargo Center. McDonald, 36, devoured 287 wings, five more than the runner-up, South Jersey postman Dave "U.S. Male" Goldstein. The Bear is new to competitive eating, having just started in May. "This is the biggest contest in the world," The Bear said.
SPORTS
June 27, 2012 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Columnist
In 27 years at The Inquirer, one of my favorite stories I wrote was a profile of El Wingador on the morning of Wing Bowl in 2002. I was at his home at 4 a.m. and followed him through to his crowning as Wing Bowl champion for the third time. I loved that story for two reasons. One, the level of Americana - the things El Wingador said and did that morning before and during the competition were simply priceless. But the second reason is the more important one. There was more than foolishness.
NEWS
June 11, 2012
By William Saletan   Politicians are hypocrites. We know this from sex scandals: The lawmakers who preach loudest about chastity are often the ones who later get caught using hookers or cheating on their wives.   In recent years, the chastity movement has turned from sex to junk food. But the hypocrisy hasn't changed. Take the hero of the food temperance movement, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg. He has banned trans fats, pressured companies to reduce salt, and mandated public calorie counts at restaurants.
SPORTS
August 25, 2010
ACCORDING TO a recent World Health Organization study, two-thirds of Americans are overweight, and numbers since 1960 have skyrocketed when it comes to obesity. With that being said . . . For just $10, you can stuff your face Monday as the Reading Phillies plan to hold "Save Gluttony Night" at First Energy Stadium. The annual event allows fans to purchase a wristband giving them access to unlimited junk food at the concession stands until the seventh-inning stretch. According to a release from the Reading Phillies, the last Gluttony Night in June found that the average person consumed $24.51 worth of food per $10 investment.
SPORTS
December 24, 2008 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
While I prepare my stomach for some Christmas Eve gluttony, it's time for another peek inside the e-mail bag: You missed a "boo" for Andy Reid. He knocked the defense for a slow start when they gave up a total of 10 points. Reid sounds like a complete and lost fool. - Gonzo The first question you guys should ask is this: "Andy, who was responsible for the play-calling today?" If it's [Marty] Mornhinweg, of course Reid is going to cover for him. It's your job to make sure he doesn't.
NEWS
December 3, 2007 | By DANIEL A. CIRUCCI
I HAVE a confession. I HATE the Delaware River Port Authority. DESPISE the New Jersey Turnpike Authority and the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission. LOATHE the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Am REPULSED by the Burlington County Bridge Commission. I hate them all because they are wasteful patronage havens, often corrupt and largely unaccountable to the public. But most of all I hate them because they collect the tolls. The Benjamin Franklin Bridge cost about $40 million or so to build in 1926.
NEWS
September 20, 2007 | By Martin Binks
As the new season of NBC's The Biggest Loser unfolds, ask yourself this: Would I want to watch a loved one who struggles daily with the physical, mental and emotional ramifications of a life-threatening illness treated this way? Capitalizing on obesity, one of the country's fastest-growing epidemics, the program is the latest proof that the sideshow mentality and sensationalistic abuse of reality television have gone too far. Several years ago, when The Real World and Survivor started placing real people in contrived situations with cameras rolling, America sat transfixed as "unscripted" human drama unfolded.
NEWS
February 3, 2007 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The predicted ice pellets never pelted. So the coast was clear for the early birds entering the Wachovia Center. And after Round One, the leader with a perhaps unprecedented 112 wings was a man from Clifton Heights. Suddenly, Wing Bowl 15, billed as "Philadelphia vs. the World," tantalized with a prospect as glittery as a Wingette's hair: Somebody local - "Gentleman Jerry" Coughlan - just might win. Incredibly, Philadelphia's Khalil Masso ("The Beast From the Northeast")
NEWS
February 4, 2006 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Men gnawing on chicken wings. Women prancing about in thongs and bursting out of their shirts. Howling crowds oozing testosterone. People have long been saying that someone ought to make a movie out of Wing Bowl, that most Roman of annual public spectacles in Philadelphia. And yesterday, as championship eater Joey Chestnut of San Jose, Calif., wolfed down a record 173 chicken wings to best a field of 27 eaters at a packed Wachovia Center, such an idea moved a step closer to reality.
NEWS
December 30, 2004 | By Katherine Dowling Schlaerth
"Well, doctor, I'm afraid I've been bad," confided the rotund sextagenarian perched on the exam table. "My husband and I have been doing a lot of eating out since he retired, and watching a whole lot of TV. I guess I'll have to start cooking again, and get my eating under control. " This woman's attitude was a breath of fresh air. Many obese patients come to see their physician with the intention of being prescribed a pill to help them lose weight. Indeed, most of the advertisements in the media promise effortless weight loss, no will power needed.
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