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Gnocchi

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FOOD
June 2, 1993 | By Marcia Cone and Thelma Snyder, FOR THE INQUIRER
Are nutrition and speed in the kitchen compatible? We think so, and most of our columns are about just that. But when you add children to the preparation equation, the food should not only be quick and nutritious, but fun. We tried to think of the meals that we liked making when we were children. One was gnocchi, a light potato dumpling. Gnocchi (pronounced "nya-kee" in Italian) calls for cooked potatoes, and these can be done quickly in the microwave. The potatoes are then peeled and pressed through a ricer or food mill, a step the children love to do. After the dough is mixed, the individual rolling of the dumplings is something children also are really good at. We suggest that the adults do the boiling of the dumplings in batches, while the children continue the mass production.
FOOD
October 21, 2010
October comfort That snap of fall sent Christian Gatti, chef/co-owner of the BYOB Avril in Bala Cynwyd, to his roasting pans. One of the hearty results is braised brisket with gnocchi stroganoff, a twist on a classic comfort dish. He braises the brisket for three hours with carrots, celery, and spices, caramelized pearl onions, Brussels sprouts, and several kinds of mushrooms. To make the sauce, he adds Dijon mustard, sour cream, rosemary, the braising demiglace, and a splash of cream.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Afirst impression at Gnocchi, the newish Italian restaurant on Passyunk Avenue, off South Street, is that it's very much like its namesake: very, very simple, with a silken touch of sensory elegance. This, I later learned, is precisely what its Italian-born chef and owner had in mind. "I just wanted to have a nice, cozy restaurant. To give good food to people; good quality and not charge them a lot. I want everybody to be happy," Sandro Frusone told me by phone after a recent visit.
FOOD
January 29, 2009
By Rachael Ray Clarkson Potter. 360 pp. $24.95 Reviewed by Robin Currie, for the Inquirer First, a confession: I have never been a big Rachael Ray fan. I have always found her, well, annoying. But I was willing to look at her new Big Orange Book with an open mind. Rachael refers to this book as "BOB," for Big Orange Book , so I will, too. Well, BOB and I did not get off to a great start. I could not identify the first photograph in the book. What was it? Why did it look like there was raw chicken in it?
FOOD
March 21, 2013
Mr. Joe's Cafe is one of those timeless corner luncheonettes that feels like an institution though it's barely seven years old. That's because there's real history here, where Vince Termini's father, Joseph, founded the famous bakery in 1921 - thus the name and bakery memorabilia on the wall. With the cannoli palace long since moved across the street, Vince's "retirement project" is a homey lunch-only homage to his red-gravy South Philly youth. He re-creates the flavors his Nonna and Mamma taught him, like "scripelle" chicken soup brimming with shaved crepe rolls stuffed with pecorino, or the side of string beans and potatoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2000 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Walt Ziejewski likes happy people. When people are happy, he says, then he is happy. Managing the service area of a major car dealership didn't bring him into close contact with many smiles. "Most of the people coming to me were having car problems. When I saw them, something was wrong. They weren't very happy. " Wrong kind of business for a social guy who became completely stressed by seeing people in bad moods. So Ziejewski, 30, thought he'd give another type of stress a try - the restaurant business.
NEWS
September 14, 2005 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lamberta Cavallito Massaglia, 80, of Mount Airy, who with her son Giovanni operated La Grolla Restaurant in Queen Village for 22 years, died of cancer Sept. 5 at home. Pasta was Mrs. Massaglia's speciality. She made gnocchi and tortellini with such skill and delicacy that another son, Joseph, would secretly steal her pasta dishes to feed celebrity clients at the Atlantic City casino where he worked. "Before she died, she told me she was going to be making gnocchi for St. Peter and some people in heaven were going to get fat," Giovanni Massaglia said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1996 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
She ordered the insalata tricolore; I chose the Greek salad. Then she selected a gnocchi dish and vitello al limone. Meanwhile, I was deciding on the spanakopita and arni kapama. Was she at a trattoria dining Italian, and I all alone at a nearby Greek taverna shouting "opah" between courses? No, we were both at Cafe Zesty, in Manayunk, where the menu has given new meaning to Greco-Roman. Cafe Zesty, the work of Tom Konidaris, opened back in 1993, and a year ago expanded next door to double its size.
SPORTS
March 28, 1987 | By DICK JERARDI, Daily News Sports Writer
When Brandywine closed its doors last Aug. 17, it would have been hard to find many people (including and especially track employees) who thought the track would reopen for its 35th year. Brandywine's property was to be rezoned to make way for a shopping center and harness racing was to be a memory. Subsequently, the zoning change was turned down. And, now it's time for a whole new set of memories to be developed at the Delaware Valley's first and now only harness track. Tomorrow night (post time 7:30 p.m.)
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FOOD
April 22, 2016
Makes 4 servings 2 cups spinach 11/2 cups flat leaf parsley 1/2 cup celery leaves 4 medium-size Idaho potatoes 3/8 cup matzo meal, plus 1/2 cup more for dusting 1 egg 1 tablespoon Kosher salt, plus 1/4 cup for salting the water 1/4 cup olive oil 4 tablespoons butter 1 teaspoon ground black pepper Juice   of 1/2 a lemon 1/2 cup grated raclette cheese, or Gruyere if raclette is unavailable ...
FOOD
July 17, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
A short trek Doug and Kelly Hager and chef Jeremy Nolen from South Street's Brauhaus Schmitz have made the three-block trek from Germany to America with Whetstone Tavern , at the corner of Fifth and Bainbridge Streets. "Being on South Street for six years, we know what the neighborhood likes," Hager said. Menu of updated classics has most entrées priced in the $20s. Whetstone's 15-beer tap selection is augmented by Marnie Old's 60-bottle wine list, of which 20 are served by the glass.
FOOD
March 21, 2013
Mr. Joe's Cafe is one of those timeless corner luncheonettes that feels like an institution though it's barely seven years old. That's because there's real history here, where Vince Termini's father, Joseph, founded the famous bakery in 1921 - thus the name and bakery memorabilia on the wall. With the cannoli palace long since moved across the street, Vince's "retirement project" is a homey lunch-only homage to his red-gravy South Philly youth. He re-creates the flavors his Nonna and Mamma taught him, like "scripelle" chicken soup brimming with shaved crepe rolls stuffed with pecorino, or the side of string beans and potatoes.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | Craig LaBan
Craig: I had a number of great bites this week — including the season's first al fresco tacos al pastor from Los Taquitos de Puebla, which can only mean one thing: the return of the Head House Farmer's Market … what a joy! Here ares some other great flavors that make up this week's Crumb Tracker Quiz. (1) spinach gnocchi with ricotta salata; (2) peanut butter ice cream double-chocolate chip cookie sandwich (3) artisanal ham plate (with Finchville Farms sugar-cured country ham from Kentucky, with drop biscuits, honey butter and green tomato marmalade (people, this is a "wow" ham if there ever was one)
FOOD
October 21, 2010
October comfort That snap of fall sent Christian Gatti, chef/co-owner of the BYOB Avril in Bala Cynwyd, to his roasting pans. One of the hearty results is braised brisket with gnocchi stroganoff, a twist on a classic comfort dish. He braises the brisket for three hours with carrots, celery, and spices, caramelized pearl onions, Brussels sprouts, and several kinds of mushrooms. To make the sauce, he adds Dijon mustard, sour cream, rosemary, the braising demiglace, and a splash of cream.
FOOD
May 7, 2009 | By Judy DeHaven FOR THE INQUIRER
When I was young, one of my favorite meals was a dish my mother called "creation. " It consisted of ground beef, noodles, and whatever she had in the pantry. I didn't realize it then, but it was also a way Mom fed a family of six on a budget. She could make her "creation" for about $1.50. I look back now and marvel at her ingenuity. My idea of a cheap dinner is a box of macaroni and cheese. And there was my mother, Pat DeHaven, concocting her own inexpensive meal and turning it into a family favorite.
FOOD
January 29, 2009
By Rachael Ray Clarkson Potter. 360 pp. $24.95 Reviewed by Robin Currie, for the Inquirer First, a confession: I have never been a big Rachael Ray fan. I have always found her, well, annoying. But I was willing to look at her new Big Orange Book with an open mind. Rachael refers to this book as "BOB," for Big Orange Book , so I will, too. Well, BOB and I did not get off to a great start. I could not identify the first photograph in the book. What was it? Why did it look like there was raw chicken in it?
NEWS
July 9, 2008
Craig LaBan: Good afternoon, my hungry friends, and welcome back to the Philly food chat that puts the sizzle in your summer dining. Sorry about my unexpected absence from the chat last week - I was covering the Fancy Food Show in New York. It's a fun, but overwhelming event, what with five miles of olive oils, cheese, truffled butters, jams, miracle waters and salted caramels lining the Jacob Javitz Center. Still, I found some great things to nibble on, like a chile-spiced pineapple marmalade from Mauritius (made by Poivre d'Or)
NEWS
September 14, 2005 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lamberta Cavallito Massaglia, 80, of Mount Airy, who with her son Giovanni operated La Grolla Restaurant in Queen Village for 22 years, died of cancer Sept. 5 at home. Pasta was Mrs. Massaglia's speciality. She made gnocchi and tortellini with such skill and delicacy that another son, Joseph, would secretly steal her pasta dishes to feed celebrity clients at the Atlantic City casino where he worked. "Before she died, she told me she was going to be making gnocchi for St. Peter and some people in heaven were going to get fat," Giovanni Massaglia said.
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