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Gnomes

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NEWS
April 22, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ask Scott Kollins about his fascination with gnomes, and he starts with a disclaimer: "I'm not over the deep end - yet. " But in the dozen or so years he's been collecting statues of these jaunty "little people," Kollins concedes he's occasionally drifted toward that "deep end," a place already inhabited by untold numbers of people around the world. "Gnomes are goofy. They're wacky. I think they're funny," says Kollins, a sales manager for a consulting company, who has 15 gnomes stationed throughout his tiny rowhouse garden in Fairmount.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Think of Ryan Howard, and what comes to mind? Well, let's see. Tall. Strong. Baby face. Slugger. What? You mean "garden gnome" didn't roll off your tongue? Not unless you're one of the marketing whizzes for the double-A Reading Phillies. They've outdone themselves this time. With apparently way too much time on their hands in the off-season, they managed to come up with the weirdest giveaway I've ever seen: the Ryan Howard Garden Gnome. In the minor leagues, it's always about the swag.
NEWS
June 5, 1998 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is no Matisse, no Gauguin or Pissarro, not even a Morisot hanging in the art collection of the Tasty Baking Co. in North Philadelphia. But should the venerable purveyor of Tastykakes wish to be as kind to the Philadelphia Museum of Art as Sara Lee Corp. has been to the Art Institute of Chicago and 19 other U.S. museums, some fine works could one day hang in public view. Gnomes, for instance. Those cute little figures that graced Tastykakes posters and packaging in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Robbie Shell, For The Inquirer
It's hard to miss Eric Sauers when he roars up on his motorcycle. It's not just the bike - a gleaming white Yamaha Stratoliner - but the black T-shirt with the words "Death Grip" on the front and a black leather vest displaying a skull logo. Many things about Sauers, at a beefy 6-foot-1 and 280 pounds, seem contradictory. The soft-spoken 29-year-old works as a Web designer at the University of Pennsylvania and lives in Mount Airy with his wife and dog, but he also spends time riding in full gear and partying with friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
It's a sorry spectacle, watching garden gnomes being robbed of their dignity. This diminutive legion, many in dapper beards and pointy hats, can be found in just about every corner of the world, lolling on well-tended lawns, propping up wheelbarrows amid flowers and shrubs. And they can be found, too, in Gnomeo & Juliet , a computer-animated iteration of Shakespeare's tragic romance in which a boy and a girl from warring clans fall in love, only to discover that old quarrels can have daunting, and sometimes dire, results.
NEWS
June 26, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania's Irvine Auditorium is a quirky-looking building that has lurked for 60 years at the northwest corner of 34th and Spruce streets waiting to pounce on innocents. It is the job of the gnomes who reside therein to sequester themselves at the point of its vaulted ceiling, which is almost as high as Jack's beanstalk, and swallow in one gulp any musical note foolish enough to fly up and away from the stage. The question is not how those edacious little gnomes get up there on the ceiling.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1998 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Even on Fox, even playing a teenage role, Christina Applegate had to bank millions for her 11 years on Married . . . With Children. So why take a part on a sad-sack comedy like Jesse, which premieres tonight on NBC? Because she can demonstrate her considerable acting chops. And she can demonstrate them to all the world. Even at post-Seinfeld levels, NBC Thursday is still TV's hottest night, and Jesse is sure to be the season's most heavily watched new show. But riding on the backs of your neighbors isn't good enough, and Jesse doesn't look like it has the strength to survive elsewhere.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
WHAT'S 5-foot-2, has swans-a-two, and every dude from Dr. Seu-ss? The Jersey-made cake that won Best in Show in City of Hope's 10th annual "Let Them Eat Cake" competition, that's what. Monday evening, Haddonfield's Sweet T's Bakeshop took home the blue ribbon (really a blue glass sculpture and generous gift basket) for its colorful, quirky and purposely askew take on this year's fantasy theme, beating out 20 other pro and student-made over-the-top pastries. The competition was friendly, but fierce: fairies vs. gnomes, happy brides vs. Mad Hatters, the "Hunger Games" vs. a giant orange octopus.
NEWS
September 18, 2011
Ralph J. Lomma, 87, who at midcentury helped set the static pastime of miniature golf in motion, letting players tilt at windmills, shoot across rising drawbridges, and, at game's end, watch the ball vanish forever into the maw of a voracious clown, died Monday in Scranton. The cause was complications of a fall he had several months ago, his son, Jonathan, said. Mr. Lomma did not invent miniature golf: The game, originally genteelly landscaped, has its roots in 19th-century Britain.
NEWS
December 30, 1998 | By Deirdre Shaw, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In his basement, Michael Castagna had a treasure wrapped in paper and stored in cardboard boxes - hundreds of collectible dolls, worth up to $100,000. That was more than enough to pay off Castagna's $50,000 in education loans. But Castagna said he had no idea of the dolls' value until they were stolen and he found some of them being peddled by his next-door neighbor, at tag-sale prices, on the neighbor's lawn. "I knew he was having yard sales, but I never paid attention," Castagna, 30, of the 700 block of Woodland Terrace, said yesterday.
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NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
WHAT'S 5-foot-2, has swans-a-two, and every dude from Dr. Seu-ss? The Jersey-made cake that won Best in Show in City of Hope's 10th annual "Let Them Eat Cake" competition, that's what. Monday evening, Haddonfield's Sweet T's Bakeshop took home the blue ribbon (really a blue glass sculpture and generous gift basket) for its colorful, quirky and purposely askew take on this year's fantasy theme, beating out 20 other pro and student-made over-the-top pastries. The competition was friendly, but fierce: fairies vs. gnomes, happy brides vs. Mad Hatters, the "Hunger Games" vs. a giant orange octopus.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Robbie Shell, For The Inquirer
It's hard to miss Eric Sauers when he roars up on his motorcycle. It's not just the bike - a gleaming white Yamaha Stratoliner - but the black T-shirt with the words "Death Grip" on the front and a black leather vest displaying a skull logo. Many things about Sauers, at a beefy 6-foot-1 and 280 pounds, seem contradictory. The soft-spoken 29-year-old works as a Web designer at the University of Pennsylvania and lives in Mount Airy with his wife and dog, but he also spends time riding in full gear and partying with friends.
NEWS
September 18, 2011
Ralph J. Lomma, 87, who at midcentury helped set the static pastime of miniature golf in motion, letting players tilt at windmills, shoot across rising drawbridges, and, at game's end, watch the ball vanish forever into the maw of a voracious clown, died Monday in Scranton. The cause was complications of a fall he had several months ago, his son, Jonathan, said. Mr. Lomma did not invent miniature golf: The game, originally genteelly landscaped, has its roots in 19th-century Britain.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2011 | By Rick Bentley, McClatchy Newspapers
Topping this week's DVD releases are an animated tale for the family and what could be the launch of a sci-fi franchise. Gnomeo and Juliet, Grade C-minus: Two gnomes from the opposite side of the fence fall in love. James McAvoy and Emily Blunt provide their voices. It took 11 years to make the animated take on Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet using garden gnomes. It feels more like it was made in days. The script lacks originality, the Elton John soundtrack feels forced, and the characters are more creepy than cuddly.
NEWS
April 22, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ask Scott Kollins about his fascination with gnomes, and he starts with a disclaimer: "I'm not over the deep end - yet. " But in the dozen or so years he's been collecting statues of these jaunty "little people," Kollins concedes he's occasionally drifted toward that "deep end," a place already inhabited by untold numbers of people around the world. "Gnomes are goofy. They're wacky. I think they're funny," says Kollins, a sales manager for a consulting company, who has 15 gnomes stationed throughout his tiny rowhouse garden in Fairmount.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
It's a sorry spectacle, watching garden gnomes being robbed of their dignity. This diminutive legion, many in dapper beards and pointy hats, can be found in just about every corner of the world, lolling on well-tended lawns, propping up wheelbarrows amid flowers and shrubs. And they can be found, too, in Gnomeo & Juliet , a computer-animated iteration of Shakespeare's tragic romance in which a boy and a girl from warring clans fall in love, only to discover that old quarrels can have daunting, and sometimes dire, results.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Think of Ryan Howard, and what comes to mind? Well, let's see. Tall. Strong. Baby face. Slugger. What? You mean "garden gnome" didn't roll off your tongue? Not unless you're one of the marketing whizzes for the double-A Reading Phillies. They've outdone themselves this time. With apparently way too much time on their hands in the off-season, they managed to come up with the weirdest giveaway I've ever seen: the Ryan Howard Garden Gnome. In the minor leagues, it's always about the swag.
SPORTS
May 19, 2010 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Creepy figurines Tuesday night was Roy Halladay bobblehead night at Citizens Bank Park, coincidentally corresponding with a Halladay start. Before the game, Shane Victorino, David Herndon, and Juan Castro proudly displayed Halladay bobbleheads in their lockers. All things considered, the Halladay bobble bears a decent enough resemblance to the real Halladay. The beard is there. But he looks to be cracking a bit of a smile, which rarely ever happens on the mound. There have been bobbleheads that looked far, far worse.
NEWS
March 20, 2007 | By PATTY-PAT KOZLOWSKI
THROUGHOUT our childhood, my two sisters and I begged our parents to let us get a dog - with all the usual empty promises that we'd feed him and clean up after him. Mom Carmella was totally against the idea since a Pekinese mistook her knee for a pork chop back in the 1950s. We asked for a dog for birthdays, graduations, parole hearings, funerals. So when a friend had a brother who was looking for a home for a Dalmatian puppy named Patches, Operation Hide the Spotted Dog began.
FOOD
December 18, 2002 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
In the 19th century, Christmas treats of candy and nuts, apples and figs, popcorn, gingerbread and oranges came at a price - a memorized verse or a token switch by a menacing Belsnickel, a gnome who sometimes meted out "punishment" to children, naughty or nice. That frowsy figure of German folklore still elicits squeals of fright and delight from children, if only at historic re-creations like those held last week at Landis Valley Museum, a living-history farm site in Lancaster.
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