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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Who says you can't teach an old dog new tricks? Take Arthur's, Philadelphia's 50-year-old steakhouse, for example. Its new, innovative menu offers something for even the most cholesterol-conscious among us, while still maintaining those prime beef selections on which it used to "steak" its reputation. The dining room still has that large, clubby look, but it literally sparkles. Tables are arranged so that your closest neighbor couldn't touch your bread or appetizer even if he were the Boston Celtics' Kevin McHale.
NEWS
January 7, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
South Street lost a bistro when Alex on South closed late last year, but gained another when Adrienne's opened not long afterward one block to the east. Like Alex's, Adrienne's has hearty food, big portions, moderate prices and a casual air, even though the dark-hued, 48-seat dining room hung with equestrian prints has the clubby look of a Ralph Lauren home furnishings showroom. Husband-and-wife proprietors Wally and Adrienne Hertler are on the premises - he working the front of the house, she in charge of the kitchen.
FOOD
August 2, 2012 | By Jessica Lopez, PHILLY.COM
The Smoke Truck, featuring the barbecue prowess of Mississippian Mark A. Coates, impressed the judges and was named winner of the Vendy Cup at the second annual Vendy Awards Saturday. People's choice winner was Vernalicious - Verna Swerdlow and David Jurkofsky's comfort-fooder - and best dessert honors went to Lil' Pop Shop, Jeanne Chang and Vince Tseng's popsicle company. The winners of both the 2011 and 2012 Philadelphia Vendy Awards will roll into Eakins Oval on Thursday, for the Winners' Oval Event.
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | By Ashley Primis, For the Inquirer
Chef Patrick Feury unwrapped the disks of Yellow Springs Farm goat cheese and wiped them down with the gentle touch usually reserved for newborns and puppies. It's all part of his process of aging the product himself, something he learned at cheese school in Vermont last year. When he picks up the goods from the Chester County makers, they are two weeks young. He matures them for two to three more weeks. "Part of serving them is making sure that the characteristics are at their best," says the chef of Nectar, in Berwyn.
NEWS
January 30, 2005 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As its name implies, Catherine's is a friendly, neighborhood kind of place. Catherine's, a dinner-only BYO in Unionville run by a young married couple, is more refined and sophisticated than gregarious and down-home, however, partly because of its feng shui d?cor and mainly because of its eclectic cuisine. The nine-entr?e menu includes all the favorites that define 21st-century dining - sea scallops, rack of lamb and tuna steak, among them. They are prepared with a great deal of originality and simplicity in mind.
NEWS
January 16, 2005 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Phoenixville was founded on ethnic diversity. Now, it can be described as an emerging culinary haven for diverse tastes. In a short span of time, it seems, the borough's landmark eatery, the Columbia Hotel, has received a makeover and new places ranging from hip bistros to sports bars have opened in the heart of the borough. The latest addition is a restaurant that takes its name from a popular pottery made in the 1880s by the Phoenixville firm of Griffen, Smith & Hill. Majolica brings what could be described as a little bit of South Street and Brooklyn's Park Slope to a borough that has worked hard to escape the fate of many former steel towns.
FOOD
January 25, 1987 | By Regina Schrambling, Special to The Inquirer
New York is a city in which some people unflinchingly pay $20 a pound for a designer lettuce known as mache. White strawberries from Chile sell out at $6 a half-pint; wild mushrooms at $30 a pound never have time to wither on store shelves. And so when the Reagan administration announced that it was planning to slap a 200 percent tariff on some of the necessities of Manhattan life and set a date of Friday, the news was greeted in true New York fashion: People are complaining, but they're not going to stop buying.
FOOD
July 9, 2009 | Reviewed by Robin Currie
A Southern Chef's Love Affair With Italian Food Artisan Books, $40.   This cookbook could easily be overlooked as a coffee table book, but that would be an injustice to the author. Stitt is the chef/owner of restaurants in Birmingham, Ala., including the Highlands Bar & Grill, and Bottega Restaurant & Cafe. Winner of the James Beard Foundation's Award for the Best Chef in the Southeast, he was also nominated for 2008 Outstanding Chef. He cooks imaginative Italian food with a Southern twist: pizza with tomato chutney and roasted sweet peppers; potato ravioli with crawfish, candied lemon and Tabasco.
FOOD
February 13, 1994 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
A storm-caused roof leak had snuffed the lights in our greenhouse dining room at the London Grill in the Art Museum area. For romantic purposes, the candlelit coziness would have been divine. For reviewing, however, the lack of light made certain aspects of the job devilishly difficult. Darkness didn't dim our delight in the flavors of this exceptional restaurant's food, however. Dinner pleasures began with one of the restaurant's good deals, a three- appetizer sampler offered at a bargain price of $9. One of the appetizers was a sliver of smoky-delicious salmon terrine layered with wasabi and caviar.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
The siren scent from Pomodoro's grill wafts out onto the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. It's seductive now, but I imagine it will be even more welcome when winter moves in to stay, and barbecue weather is just a memory. Pomodoro, which means tomato in Italian, is one plum tomato. It is the latest enterprise of Gabe Marabella and Neil Stein, who operate the very popular Marabella's restaurants. With Pomodoro, they take the Marabella's formula - good ingredients, simple preparation, reasonable prices - and give it a sophisticated sheen at slightly higher prices.
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