IN THE NEWS

God

ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
  Back in ancient times, say, 1956, when Charlton Heston led the Israelites on their epic march out of Egypt in Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments , miracles like the parting of the Red Sea were, indeed, miraculous. Matte paintings, rear projection, a gigantic U-shaped water tank, hundreds of costumed extras leaning into wind machines, all that livestock, the duck that waddles out of the frame - the coordination of actors, animals, machinery, props, hair stylists, dolly grips, truly astounding!
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
To have her day in court, Highland Regional High School senior Samantha Jones had to skip powder-puff football practice Wednesday. But she was OK with that. She'd already touched base with her teachers about what she'd have to make up from her classes that day. That was OK, too. The Blackwood 18-year-old was living a life lesson as valuable as anything she would get in a classroom - lending her name to something she believes in. Jones was in Superior Court in Freehold, N.J., on Wednesday as an intervenor opposing a lawsuit that seeks to have the words under God struck from the Pledge of Allegiance recited by schoolchildren.
NEWS
November 7, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN ALMETA Scott Bowen cooked, she always included what she believed to be the most important ingredient: love. That undoubtedly was why the meals that emanated from her kitchen always tasted so good. She put a dollop of love in every dish, because Almeta not only loved to cook, she loved the people who sat down at her table, her extended family, friends and neighbors. They got a spiritual jolt with every course. The fact that she lived to 104 was a gift from God, she felt.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HELEN BURNS was a searcher for lost souls. She was an associate Baptist minister, but she didn't confine her search to the precincts of her church. She went into the outside world, where other sinners lurked. And what better place to find them than prisons? She took her ministry to Graterford Prison, the George W. Hill Correctional Institution in Delaware County, and other facilities confining those who had made wrong choices in their lives. Helen had an instinct for knowing where to find the people who were most in need of her brand of faith and spiritual uplift, delivered with her special compassion and love.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | BY GREGORY A. DADDIS
AS THE United States charges once more into war, little debate has centered on the actual utility of war. Instead, policymakers and pundits have focused their comments on combating the latest danger to our nation and its interests as posed by Islamic State militants. In late August, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel claimed that Islamic State was an "imminent threat to every interest we have" and that the sophisticated group was "beyond anything we've seen. " With few dissenting voices, either in Congress or in the American media, U.S. air forces plunged again into the unstable region of the Middle East.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
ISSUE | NEEDY Helping hands The Jewish community is not immune to hardship ("Area's Jewish population is not immune to poverty," Sept. 16). I am a packer and driver for the Beth Sholom Mitzvah Pantry. It is very gratifying when you go to a person's house and are able to provide basic food items. We only pack twice a month, but our tight-knit group of semi-retirees and retirees feels as though we are helping and hope that one day we can break the poverty cycle. |Ann Gold, Philadelphia, gold500219@aol.com Charity is the key Reality has finally hit that the area Jewish population does not all go to Florida in the winter ("Area's Jewish population is not immune to poverty," Sept.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | BY BECKY BATCHA, Daily News Staff Writer batchab@phillynews.com, 215-854-5757
BETWEEN the Broadway musical playing on Walnut Street and the 60,000-square-foot granite temple going up on Vine Street at Logan Circle, it's been a big summer for Mormons. That's the nickname, of course, for members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. And, yes, it's a nickname they're OK with. "It's not offensive," assures Corinne Dougherty, regional spokeswoman for LDS. What they're less OK with: the notion that Mormons have multiple wives. "We don't believe in polygamy.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
TEENAGERS are idiots. I know this because I was a teenager, all my friends were teenagers and all of us were idiots. I also went to high school with teenagers. And they were idiots, too. This is not a slur. Teenagers have no choice but to be idiots. They know too little to be otherwise. The question is, how idiotic do they get? If they're lucky, they'll be idiotic in ways that are only silly or mortifying and they won't hurt or kill themselves or anyone else. If they're unlucky, they'll be idiotic in ways that the luckier teens will recall with sadness at future high-school reunions, when everyone's finally old enough to worry about their own idiot teenagers.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
IT'S DIFFICULT to miss the Marlton Assembly of God in Marlton, N.J. It's the expansive - and expanding - worship site a stone's throw west of Evesham Township's municipal complex. Construction that's underway on a new $5 million Family Life Center will double its footprint from 50,000 to 100,000 square feet and will include an indoor soccer field. When it was founded 30 years ago, Marlton AG ministered to a small congregation with services held at the nearby Florence Evans Elementary School.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | BY ROBERT STRAUSS, For the Daily News
AT CAPE MAY Convention Hall last Sunday, the late-afternoon light came through the floor-to-ceiling windows of the main-stage auditorium, the ocean rippling in the glow, as the Rev. Jeffrey W. Elliott, pastor of Cape May Lutheran Church, led about three dozen casually dressed worshippers in prayer. It was the midpoint of a summer series of Sunday vesper services conducted each week by a different pastor in a spirit of ecumenism by the churches of Cape May County. "We're trying to promote the idea that we all believe in the same thing, but we just practice it in a different way," said the Rev. Rina Terry, pastor of Cape May United Methodist Church, who coordinates the weekly vespers.
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