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Godiva

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BUSINESS
January 10, 1996 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Campbell Soup Co. yesterday named the head of its Godiva chocolates division to a new position guiding development of its signature brands around the world. David L. Albright, 48, will enter the newly created position of vice president for global brand development at the Camden food company in about a month. With a mature market for its products at home, Campbell has been looking for growth overseas by repackaging its familiar U.S. brands and developing new products for Europe, Latin America and emerging markets in Asia.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2012
Q: Kimberly, I love chocolate! Is it possible to eat it on a regular basis without totally ruining my diet? - J. Moss A: Absolutely. In fact, you can eat a piece of chocolate every day and still lose weight, no problem. The key, as always, is portion control. One ounce of plain chocolate per day will cost you about 150 calories. Other chocolate candies' calorie counts vary. A York Peppermint Patty is 150 calories. But one of my favorites, a piece of premium Godiva chocolate, is 250 calories.
NEWS
June 20, 2001
By Lisa B. Samalonis You know spring is slipping into summer when the line at the local drive-up ice cream stand stretches onto the road. Men, women and lots of children stand under the bright parking-lot lights during the evening, swatting mosquitoes and patiently waiting their turn. Well, maybe not all so patiently. Boys and girls shuffle from side to side in their sneakers and tug on a parent's arm. "Is it my turn yet? How about now?" In the afternoon, the ice cream truck loops around the housing development and awakens napping children.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1997 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Today's the day we finally learn the fate of Conrail, right? Wrong. Even though Conrail shareholders are to vote today on whether to clear the way for their company to merge with transportation giant CSX Corp., company officials say they won't immediately announce an outcome. The official count may not be available until Monday, a Conrail spokesman said. At the meeting, shareholders could also decide to keep open the possibility of Conrail eventually merging with Norfolk Southern Railroad.
NEWS
August 22, 1993 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
All computer errors should turn out so well. Betty Strecker, an administrative assistant at Doylestown Hospital, was practicing using new computer software earlier this summer when she accidentally sent a mock announcement about a chocolate competition to every computer terminal at the hospital. Employees liked the idea and decided to turn Strecker's chocolate fantasy into reality. "A lot of interested people called and talked to the director," said Strecker, who made up the contest to amuse her boss, Jo Anne Mackie, director of the radiology school.
NEWS
February 13, 2001 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Call me heartless, an unromantic, insensitive grouch, but I hate Valentine's Day. There, I said it. I boldly write the words so many men are scared to utter in public, especially around their women. I boldly stand up to the marketing firepower of Hallmark, American Greetings, FTD, Zales and Godiva (16 truffles in a heart-shaped box, $30) - and risk the outrage of millions of females who expect a token of love from their man tomorrow. Valentine's Day is a sham, perpetuated by self-serving corporations and sopped up by our commodity-driven culture.
NEWS
September 6, 2000 | By Lee Drutman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Dessert entrepreneur Ann Bartholomay has plans for making the world a sweeter place. She envisions people across the country enjoying her fancy pastries in Annie B's Cafes, shelling out premium prices for such confections as harlequin shortbread, tangerine cream puffs, and white-chocolate macadamia-nut tarts. In essence, she says, she wants to do for pastries what Starbucks did for coffee and Godiva for chocolate. "We're carving out a niche of high-end pastries," said Bartholomay.
NEWS
September 12, 2006 | By Janice Hatfield Young
When I was in my mid-20s, I met a woman in her 40s who quaintly confessed to being a "chocoholic. " At the time, I thought she was simply putting a positive spin on her penchant for a nutritionally incorrect food. But then I witnessed her consume a box of Godiva one day. Wow. It was a safe bet that anything chocolate - cookies, candy, cake - would make a welcome gift or treat for her. Unless, of course, she was "off chocolate. " The first time I heard that expression, I wondered if it meant she would toss out her Pepperidge Farm Milanos, much the way a recovering alcoholic would discard leftover Stoli.
FOOD
July 2, 2009 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
There is a real Max Brenner behind the new Max Brenner, Chocolate by the Bald Man , the cocoa-licious restaurant/cafe/retail store/theme park/shrine opening this week at 1500 Walnut St. (215-344-8150), on 15th Street around the corner from Butcher & Singer. At least he's sort of real. The chocolatier was born Oded Brenner in Israel 41 years ago and adopted the given name of company cofounder Max Fichtman. His philosophy is that chocolate is meant to be a full sensory experience, and that by their nature, restaurants are like theater.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | By Lara Wozniak, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For the last 43 years, Helen Bengel's right hand has been covered in chocolate. Bengel is a pro in the art of hand-coating candies with chocolate to make bite-sized coconut cream eggs, nutcups, peanut clusters, and raisin cups, to name a few. First, she dips caramels, cream or nuts in a three-inch pile of melted milk chocolate warmed by an electric heater. Then, using the tip of her slender index finger as a brush, she draws crosses, cursive M's or squiggly lines on top of the sweets.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2012
Q: Kimberly, I love chocolate! Is it possible to eat it on a regular basis without totally ruining my diet? - J. Moss A: Absolutely. In fact, you can eat a piece of chocolate every day and still lose weight, no problem. The key, as always, is portion control. One ounce of plain chocolate per day will cost you about 150 calories. Other chocolate candies' calorie counts vary. A York Peppermint Patty is 150 calories. But one of my favorites, a piece of premium Godiva chocolate, is 250 calories.
NEWS
November 27, 2009 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the cynics had been right a year ago, no one would be heading to Boscov's today for a box of Godiva chocolates, a Snuggie, a Holiday Barbie, or anything at all. That's because all 39 Boscov's stores would be out of business, just another carcass at the side of Recession Road. Not the survivor that made it to Black Friday 2009. The odds were against the Reading company when it went bankrupt just weeks before last fall's stock market crash. There was, conventional wisdom said, no realistic way to rescue its thousands of regional employees, dozens of stores, or century-old legacy.
FOOD
July 2, 2009 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
There is a real Max Brenner behind the new Max Brenner, Chocolate by the Bald Man , the cocoa-licious restaurant/cafe/retail store/theme park/shrine opening this week at 1500 Walnut St. (215-344-8150), on 15th Street around the corner from Butcher & Singer. At least he's sort of real. The chocolatier was born Oded Brenner in Israel 41 years ago and adopted the given name of company cofounder Max Fichtman. His philosophy is that chocolate is meant to be a full sensory experience, and that by their nature, restaurants are like theater.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2007 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Campbell Soup Co. has thought for a while that V-8 juice and high-priced, premium-quality chocolate don't particularly go well together, and yesterday it announced a deal to sell its Godiva Chocolatier Inc. unit to a Turkish candy- and cookie-maker. The Camden company said it agreed to sell Godiva, a holdover from the days when it was a more diversified food company, to Yildiz Holding A.S., based in Istanbul, for $850 million. Campbell, which has owned Godiva since 1974, put it up for sale in August, saying it wanted to concentrate on making V-8, soup and snacks.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2007 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Campbell Soup Co. said yesterday that it might sell its Godiva Chocolatier business to focus more sharply on soups, baked snacks, and vegetable-based beverages. The possible sale of Godiva, which the Camden company brought to the United States from Belgium in 1966, comes at a time of fast growth in premium-chocolate sales. That means bidding could be lively, perhaps topping $1 billion, though recent credit problems took some fizz out of the private-equity market and could hold down the price.
NEWS
September 12, 2006 | By Janice Hatfield Young
When I was in my mid-20s, I met a woman in her 40s who quaintly confessed to being a "chocoholic. " At the time, I thought she was simply putting a positive spin on her penchant for a nutritionally incorrect food. But then I witnessed her consume a box of Godiva one day. Wow. It was a safe bet that anything chocolate - cookies, candy, cake - would make a welcome gift or treat for her. Unless, of course, she was "off chocolate. " The first time I heard that expression, I wondered if it meant she would toss out her Pepperidge Farm Milanos, much the way a recovering alcoholic would discard leftover Stoli.
NEWS
June 20, 2001
By Lisa B. Samalonis You know spring is slipping into summer when the line at the local drive-up ice cream stand stretches onto the road. Men, women and lots of children stand under the bright parking-lot lights during the evening, swatting mosquitoes and patiently waiting their turn. Well, maybe not all so patiently. Boys and girls shuffle from side to side in their sneakers and tug on a parent's arm. "Is it my turn yet? How about now?" In the afternoon, the ice cream truck loops around the housing development and awakens napping children.
NEWS
February 13, 2001 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Call me heartless, an unromantic, insensitive grouch, but I hate Valentine's Day. There, I said it. I boldly write the words so many men are scared to utter in public, especially around their women. I boldly stand up to the marketing firepower of Hallmark, American Greetings, FTD, Zales and Godiva (16 truffles in a heart-shaped box, $30) - and risk the outrage of millions of females who expect a token of love from their man tomorrow. Valentine's Day is a sham, perpetuated by self-serving corporations and sopped up by our commodity-driven culture.
NEWS
September 6, 2000 | By Lee Drutman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Dessert entrepreneur Ann Bartholomay has plans for making the world a sweeter place. She envisions people across the country enjoying her fancy pastries in Annie B's Cafes, shelling out premium prices for such confections as harlequin shortbread, tangerine cream puffs, and white-chocolate macadamia-nut tarts. In essence, she says, she wants to do for pastries what Starbucks did for coffee and Godiva for chocolate. "We're carving out a niche of high-end pastries," said Bartholomay.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1997 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Today's the day we finally learn the fate of Conrail, right? Wrong. Even though Conrail shareholders are to vote today on whether to clear the way for their company to merge with transportation giant CSX Corp., company officials say they won't immediately announce an outcome. The official count may not be available until Monday, a Conrail spokesman said. At the meeting, shareholders could also decide to keep open the possibility of Conrail eventually merging with Norfolk Southern Railroad.
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