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Godzilla

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NEWS
August 19, 1997 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Everyone who has seen "Men in Black" - as long as they got to the theater 10 minutes before it started - saw a preview for an upcoming movie called "Godzilla. " The preview - movie people also call them teasers or trailers - ends with an announcement that "Godzilla" will open on Memorial Day 1998. This is not what most people would describe as "coming soon. " The Godzilla teaser - which shows a monster foot crashing through the skylight of a museum and crushing a T. rex skeleton on display - is surely one of the earliest ever.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
You came. You saw. You destroyed Tokyo. Daily News readers whipped up a slew of suggestions - 70 in all - for our Pitch a Godzilla Movie Idea contest, which asked entrants to come up with a treatment for the next Godzilla feature. Godzilla has gone into retirement, but we're convinced that if Toho Studios takes a gander at some of these concepts, they'll orchestrate a comeback for the big guy similar to George Foreman's renaissance. Valerie Hanssens of Frankford won a collection of Godzilla videos for her suggestion: "Regarding Godzilla" "In 'Regarding Godzilla,' " she wrote, "Godzilla sustains a serious head injury and loses his memory.
NEWS
April 6, 1998 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Here's the bare-bones plot of Tri-Star Pictures' $100 million sci-fi blockbuster "Godzilla," scheduled for release May 20: A huge lizard with big spiked plates down his back - a dead ringer for a dinosaur - shows up in the middle of New York City. It's up to Matthew Broderick, Jean Reno and Hank Azaria, among others, to stop the creature before it whomps and stomps Manhattan - as well as the rest of the world - into dust. Does this sound familiar? Of course. After all, there have been 22 previous movies about Godzilla.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
"The reckless ambitions of man are often dwarfed by their dangerous consequences. " - Raymond Burr, "Godzilla 1985. " There are things into which no man should delve. Excavating 1970s pop culture, for example. Or, from the Japanese perspective at mid-century, atomic power. Godzilla, whose 23rd and most expensive movie opens Wednesday, was born of a national psyche freshly wounded by the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The monster, an obvious metaphor for atomic destruction, debuted in 1954 in director Inoshiro Honda's cautionary tale "Gojira.
NEWS
November 3, 1996 | By Franz Lidz
Tokyo has been trashed throughout the century. An earthquake laid waste the first time. A world war, the second. A radioactive reptile is responsible for the rest - Godzilla. Ever since the baby boom's biggest boomer made his film debut 42 year ago today (Why not celebrate an odd anniversary?), Godzilla has delighted in mashing the architectural monstrosities that blight the city's skyline - destructive rampages some see as not-unreasonable forms of urban renewal. Godzilla has always been an acute social critic.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1998 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
If the 1954 Godzilla - dreamed up by Japanese producer Tomoyuki Tanaka as he flew over the nuked Bikini atoll - can be read as an allegory about atomic-age anxiety and dread of the Bomb, what is Dean Devlin and Roland Emmerich's new Godzilla an allegory for? How about modern-day media hype and marketing overkill? With its mega-mantra "Size Does Matter" affixed to buses and billboards, Taco Bell TV spots and four-foot promotional pencils courtesy of TriStar Pictures (I'm writing this review with one)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1998 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The big lizard is under heavy wraps. Only disembodied glimpses are permitted: a scaly foot on a T-shirt, a set of angry eyes on a billboard, a tail, a claw, a taxi dangling from its cruel jaws. By not allowing anyone to see Godzilla in his 22-story glory before Tuesday night, Sony Pictures is sacrificing advance merchandise sales. Licensees have signed promises not to display any product that shows the full monsty until the movie finally chews up theaters. That's because Godzilla is no mere movie, says Peter Dang, executive vice president of consumer products for Sony's film arm. It's a franchise.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
DESPITE his long and storied career spanning decades and continents, Godzilla is a notoriously press-shy celebrity. But to celebrate the release of "Godzilla," in theaters on Friday, the Daily News sat down with the monster of mass destruction (as translated by Molly Eichel) to talk foreign films, enemies and which city he wishes he could destroy. Daily News: You get to work with Bryan Cranston. "Breaking Bad": Were you a fan? Godzilla: Yes! Binge-watched it over a long weekend with the missus, but, can you believe it?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2007 | By BOB STRAUSS Los Angeles Daily News
"The Host" is like a South Korean version of a Japanese monster movie. The cultural differences make it something the Japanese creature features never were: a nearly great film. Packed with politics, family conflict and satiric references to some of the more absurd aspects of Korean cinema, "The Host" never forgets to be a scary, icky, over-the-top fright fest, either. Directed by emerging genre masher Bong Joon-ho, whose 2003 "Memories of Murder" turned the police procedural inside out, "Host" starts with a neat-freak American military scientist insisting on flushing experimental biohazard material into Seoul's Han River.
NEWS
August 19, 1997 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Exactly what the American-made "Godzilla" will look like is a big secret. Although TriStar Pictures plans a mega pre-release advertising campaign, it has decreed that the image of Godzilla will not be a part of it. Which leaves us to speculate about various ways in which this "Godzilla" will differ from the 22 previous Godzilla movies made in Japan, as well as ways in which old and new will probably be alike. HOW AMERICA'S 'GODZILLA' WILL BE DIFFERENT It will be fancier.
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NEWS
May 16, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
POP CULTURE'S most terrifying creature returns to the screen in "Godzilla. " But it's not Godzilla, it's Bryan Cranston, walking around a lab in a white coat and safety glasses, and wouldn't it be fun to see what Godzilla would do after ingesting a large amount of Walter White's crystal blue? Cranston, though, is Walter by association only. Like most of the overqualified actors in the movie (Juliette Binoche, Sally Hawkins, Ken Watanabe), he is mostly around to stare, agape, at some unnamed Thing of Awe. There's a snarky movie term for this expression - the Spielberg Face.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2014 | BY GAR JOSEPH, Daily News Staff Writer josephg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5895
GODZILLA WAS born of a national psyche freshly wounded by the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. He debuted in 1954 in director Ishiro Honda's "Gojira. " Toho Studios thought so little of the project, it refused to pay for the puppets and stop-action photography that had made "King Kong" scary. Honda was forced to use a guy in a rubber monster suit. More than two dozen movies later, the special effects have blossomed in tandem with the monster's success. The latest effort, costing $160 million, is "Godzilla," which opens Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
DESPITE his long and storied career spanning decades and continents, Godzilla is a notoriously press-shy celebrity. But to celebrate the release of "Godzilla," in theaters on Friday, the Daily News sat down with the monster of mass destruction (as translated by Molly Eichel) to talk foreign films, enemies and which city he wishes he could destroy. Daily News: You get to work with Bryan Cranston. "Breaking Bad": Were you a fan? Godzilla: Yes! Binge-watched it over a long weekend with the missus, but, can you believe it?
NEWS
July 21, 2013
The Bling Ring Sofia Coppola's entertaining take on the real-life escapades of a band of San Fernando Valley teens who robbed houses of the rich and famous, coming away with millions of dollars' worth of designer goodies. A comedy, of sorts, if what it says about our obsession with celebrity culture weren't so depressing. R   Fruitvale Station Michael B. Jordan gives a deeply nuanced performance as Oscar Grant, the 22-year-old Oakland, Calif., man who was shot and killed by a transit policeman in the early hours of New Year's Day, 2009.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
ROAMING THE STREETS of West Philadelphia is a creature so fowl, one that has been cooped up for so long, that no one is sure what it's capable of doing. Armed with spurs and with moves like Jagger's, he struts down sidewalks, sleeps in trees and searches for nuts. He is the Wild Turkey of West Philly, who fled his home at Bartram's Garden after a duel with his brother in early April and has been wandering the streets of Philly like a bad parody of a Springsteen song. Even West Philly residents like Claire King, accustomed to seeing everything, have been shocked by this fantastic fowl.
NEWS
November 5, 2009 | By Ray Parrillo, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Pedro Martinez brought charm, levity, appreciation, and a high baseball IQ to the Phillies after they took a chance on resuscitating his Hall of Fame career by signing him in mid-July. But he didn't bring the weapons to tame "Godzilla. " "Godzilla" is the nickname Hideki Matsui brought along with him when he left Japan in 2003 and signed with the Yankees. In the Land of the Rising Sun, the 35-year-old Matsui enjoys legendary status equal to Martinez's in the Dominican Republic.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2009 | By Roman Deininger INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roland Emmerich has an ongoing project: destroying the world. In 1996's Independence Day, the German director sent aliens to wipe out the White House. In 1998, he unleashed Godzilla to wreak havoc on the streets of New York. In 2004's The Day After Tomorrow, he froze the planet in a new ice age. But in his new film, 2012, to be released Nov. 13 and already the eye of a vast promotion storm, things get really bad. Emmerich, who has earned the unofficial title of "Master of Disaster," admits having searched Google for a doomsday scenario even more spectacular than his previous destructions of Earth.
NEWS
February 22, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Cartoon Network's new anime entry, Bakugan Battle Brawlers (9 p.m. Sundays), arrives burdened with some heavy baggage. It's a slender if feisty cartoon with a massive mythos. On the one hand, it's the story of Dan, a spunky adolescent with rock-star hair who wears what looks like a colorful space-station suit adorned with a matching vest. Like many kids, Dan is addicted to Bagukan, an incredible game. You see, one day these playing cards came drifting out of the clouds all around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
IF A BUNCH of terrified Gen Xers with a video camera had filmed Godzilla instead of the Blair Witch, it would look a lot like "Cloverfield. " The movie apes the viral marketing campaign of "The Blair Witch Project," and rests on the same gimmick - a short prologue informs us that we're about to see footage recovered from a digital camera found at the site of something nasty. In this case, it's classified Defense Department material, recovered at what is ominously described as the "former" location of Central Park (since New York hasn't actually been destroyed, suspense is lessened)
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