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SPORTS
August 8, 2012
CYCLIST LAURA Trott of Great Britain was born a month premature with a collapsed lung. As a child, she was diagnosed with asthma. Tuesday, Trott, 20, got her second gold medal of the London Games by winning the multi-discipline omnium event - which is sort of cycling's version of an individual medley race. Leading after Day 1, Trott slipped into second place behind Sarah Hammer of the United States after the opening session. Hammer extended her lead in the penultimate event, but Trott set an Olympic record 35.100 seconds in the 500-meter time trial to win the gold.
SPORTS
August 14, 2012 | BY EMILY KAPLAN, For the Daily News
LONDON - As soon as the medal was placed around his neck, Andre Iguodala picked it up with his hands and stared at it. He turned it over, ran his fingers around it, then stared at it some more. He wouldn't let it go. Iguodala's life changed dramatically in the last 4 days, but it hasn't sunk in yet. All he's been able to think about was this medal, and finally it was his. "I just froze for a second," Iguodala said. "Only a small group can say they were in that position. " The U.S. men's basketball team defeated Spain, 107-100, on Sunday afternoon to capture its second straight Olympic gold medal.
SPORTS
August 12, 2012 | Associated Press
LONDON - Destinee wasn't enough. Brazil denied the United States its first Olympic gold medal in women's volleyball Saturday in a 3-1 upset that had the Brazilians turning somersaults on the court and some American players sobbing. It was the first loss for the United States at the tournament and the second straight gold medal for Brazil. American star Destinee Hooker, the second-best scorer in London, was held to 14 points. Jaqueline Carvalho had 18 points to help Brazil overcome a disastrous first set and win 11-25, 25-17, 25-20, 25-17.
SPORTS
August 12, 2012 | Associated Press
LONDON - Eyeing the trackside clock as she approached the finish line, Carmelita Jeter pointed the black baton in her left hand at those bright orange numbers. She wanted to make sure everyone saw what she saw: The United States was breaking the world record in the women's 4x100-meter relay - and it wasn't even close. Allyson Felix, Tianna Madison, and Bianca Knight built a big lead, and Jeter brought it home Friday night, anchoring the United States to its first Olympic gold medal in the sprint relay since 1996 with a time of 40.82 seconds, more than a half-second better than a record that had stood for 27 years.
SPORTS
July 26, 2012 | Associated Press
Goalkeeper Hope Solo said the antsy U.S. women's soccer players are ready to "unleash the beast. " The Americans open their Olympic campaign on Wednesday with a game against France in Scotland, two days before the opening ceremony. Soccer is one of two sports that starts early because the extra days are needed to play a sufficient slate of games that doesn't wear the players out. Women's soccer isn't much of a draw in Scotland. Some 37,000 fans are expected for Wednesday's game, but organizers say about 80 percent of the tickets were given away to schools and local clubs.
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | For The Inquirer / J. SCOTT LYONS
Once incarcerated in Holmesburg Prison, Tyrone Wade of Darby Borough is now a role model for neighborhood children. He disciplined himself through bodybuilding, and in an international competition last month in Barcelona, his efforts were rewarded when he won a gold medal.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Gold has moved beyond deck-the-halls festive into the glitzy realm of must-have fashion. It's the season for gleaming flecks to sparkle on fluttering eyelids and glisten on mistletoe-ready lips. A bronzy link chain, instead of a ribbon, on tuxedo-style trousers is happy-hour sultry. And shimmering, silky pantsuits are both retro and relevant. Once civilization's most sought-after metal, gold shines brightest this year in classic yellow. But copper and rose blends, especially on sequined blouses, are trending chic, too. Unlike in decades past, however, the granddaddy of precious metals no longer feels arrogant or garish.
SPORTS
September 27, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Olympics have always been known for gold and records. The Games of the XXIV Olympiad will be remembered for a gold record. "Hand in Hand," the official song of the Seoul Olympics, has sold more than one million records. The Seoul Olympic Organizing Committee says the song is No. 1 on the charts in Switzerland, Hong Kong and South Korea. And it's among the top 10 in Denmark and West Germany. The song was composed by Italy's Giorgio Moroder, who won Academy Awards for his music in the movies Midnight Express, Flashdance and Top Gun. "Hand in Hand" was recorded by a local quartet known as Koreana, which performed the number during the Games' opening ceremony.
SPORTS
July 13, 1992 | By Tom Williams, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Southwest boys' soccer team, consisting primarily of South Jersey high school players, defeated the Southeast, 5-1, yesterday in the gold-medal game of the 10th annual Garden State Games. The action took place at Rutgers University on the final day of the games, an Olympics-like event of 30 different sports for New Jersey athletes of all ages. The Southwest soccer team finished undefeated in the round-robin competition. Sean Flanagan of Shawnee High School, Matt Miles of St. Augustine, Mike Payne of St. Mary's, David Weinstein of Moorestown and James Dellapietro of Lacey contributed goals to yesterday's win. In other action, the South team won the gold medal in wrestling, 47-22, over the team from Central Jersey.
NEWS
September 30, 1988
Grace in victory is important. And it was exhibited flawlessly in the sportspersonship of America's "Golden Girls," notably double-gold track stars Jackie Joyner-Kersee and Florence Griffith Joyner, as well as the 12- member American women's basketball team who high-fived everyone in sight - including their Yugoslav opponents - after winning the Olympic title. But it's a different story when you are a gifted athlete who is expected to win in competition with an equally gifted rival - and who fails.
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BUSINESS
January 14, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
The Goldtex apartments at 315 N. 12th St. have received Philadelphia's first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold-level certification for a residential high-rise, according to the building's developer, Post Brothers. The 13-story tower earned the LEED Gold status from the U.S. Green Building Council for its energy efficiency and other environmentally friendly features, Post Brothers said in a statement. The design of the building, a former shoe factory, saves an estimated 15 million pounds of CO2 a year - the equivalent of the emissions from 1,200 motor vehicles - and runs entirely on wind-generated power, the company said.
NEWS
December 5, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
This time, Denise Scott Brown's name is on the prize. After decades of being overlooked and even openly scorned by the architecture profession, Philadelphia's best-known female designer was singled out Wednesday by the American Institute of Architects as cowinner of its prestigious Gold Medal, together with her husband and partner, Robert Venturi. An author of the groundbreaking study Learning From Las Vegas , she is the first living woman to win the medal for career achievement since the AIA began handing out the prize in 1907.
SPORTS
October 26, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Kjetil Borch and Kim Crow staked claim to Gold Cup titles at the 2014 Head of the Schuylkill Regatta on a crisp autumn day, the stakes were high. On Saturday, one year before the Rio de Janeiro Olympic Games, they were even higher. And to meet those heights, both athletes raised their levels to successfully defend their crowns against elite fields. Borch, of Norway, covered the 750-meter sprint in 2 minutes, 16.09 seconds to hold off New Zealand's Mahé Drysdale (2:19.06)
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal appeals court was asked again Wednesday to weigh in on a decadelong, flip-flop legal battle over who owns a cache of rare gold coins that could fetch more than $80 million at auction. On one side, the federal government argues that the 10 rare 1933 $20 "double eagle" gold coins were stolen from the U.S. Mint, and never put in circulation. On the other, the heirs of Philadelphia jeweler Israel Switt say that the Treasury Department improperly took property that had been handed down in their family since the 1940s.
NEWS
September 22, 2015
P AGE NEAL, 34, of Bella Vista, and Anna Bario, 33, of Brooklyn, N.Y., own Bario Neal, a handcrafted-jewelry line. The jewelry is made at a workshop and store in Bella Vista. Bario Neal uses reclaimed precious metals, ethically sourced stones and environmentally conscious practices to make jewelry. In June, they added Fairmined gold, extracted by certified ethical miners. I spoke with Neal.   Q: How'd you come up with the idea? A: Anna and I were friends at Oberlin College, and after school we each had independent labels.
NEWS
August 30, 2015 | By Dawn Fallik, For The Inquirer
In a corner of Greg Dunn's Spring Garden studio are two cabinets. One holds the sources for the science - Cajal's Butterflies of the Soul , a book of figures from the 19th and early 20th centuries focusing on the brain, and The Color Atlas of Anatomy . The other cabinet keeps the elements of his art. Mica powders, soft and glittery. Weightless tissue papers holding a variety of gold leaf - white gold, champagne gold, yellow gold. Dunn's work melds science and art, bringing images of the brain into beautiful, ethereal detail.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE LANGBORD FAMILY was poised to get back a pot of gold coins, but the paperwork rainbow never ends. The Third Circuit Court of Appeals yesterday vacated its April ruling that would have forced the U.S. Treasury Department to return 10 rare $20 "double eagles" that Joan Langbord and her sons found in a safe deposit box in 2003. The family took the coins to the U.S. Mint on Independence Mall for authentication and learned they were the real thing - coins that could fetch a whopping $80 million at auction.
SPORTS
July 28, 2015 | BY JOHN SMALLWOOD, Daily News Staff Writer smallwj@phillynews.com
PERHAPS THE least recognized part of the CONCACAF moniker is that the third "C" stands for Caribbean. Despite having 31 associations in CONCACAF, Caribbean teams have played in the shadow of their North and Central American confederation mates - especially Mexico and the United States. Only four Caribbean nations - Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago - have ever qualified for a World Cup, and none has qualified more than once. Haiti, in 1973, is the only Caribbean nation to win a CONCACAF championship - nearly two decades before the Gold Cup Tournament format was created.
SPORTS
July 28, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Corruption scandals off the field, refereeing fiascos in both the quarterfinals and semis, all that already had given this CONCACAF Gold Cup its unsavory flavor. Until Sunday night at Lincoln Financial Field. In the final, it was all about the soccer. After taking advantage of the events that got its national team to the Linc, Mexico displayed its virtuosity, burying a beautiful first-half volley, then finding the net again immediately after halftime. A third Mexican goal came in the 61st minute, when a blunder by a Jamaican defender had put the ball on a tee. This time, bad officiating had nothing to do with Mexico's victory, the final a decisive 3-1. The crowd of 68,930 was announced as the largest to see a soccer game in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
July 27, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
If this was DaMarcus Beasley's final moment with the U.S. men's national soccer team, it isn't the way he wanted to go out. Beasley, who announced he was planning to retire from the national team, had his penalty kick blocked by Panama's Luis Mejia. That clinched the penalty kick shootout for Panama, 3-2, in the CONCACAF Gold Cup third-place game before 12,598 Saturday at PPL Park.   The teams had played to a 1-1 draw through 120 minutes.  "It is tough to lose like that, not just . . . because it could be my last game but because we didn't get the result we wanted," said Beasley, who has left the window open to return.
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