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Gold Bars

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LIVING
May 15, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Four sales next week will offer auctiongoers opportunities to bid on fine Eastern carpets, Pennsylvania-related WPA art, antiques by the carload, and a chance to venture into the commodities market. The commodities adventure will be provided by Pook & Pook Inc. at its Variety Auction next Friday at its gallery in Downingtown. Among the 850 lots, to be offered beginning at 9 a.m., are two gold bars, each weighing one kilo (2.2 pounds). During Franklin D. Roosevelt's presidency, it became illegal for U.S. citizens to own gold, except in token quantities as jewelry.
NEWS
June 21, 1992 | By Carol Horner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The early memories are vivid, and neither time nor pain can blur them. The son, not yet school age, spies a blue globe and anchor tattooed on the father's upper right arm, and reaches out to touch it. Later he'll learn it's the emblem of his dad's beloved Marine Corps. Kneeling in prayer at bedtime, the son invokes the names of the father's heroes: "Now I lay me down to sleep . . . and God bless Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson . . . " Standing by a parade ground on a splendid sunny day, gripping his mother's hand, the son sees the father saluted and honored, and he feels stirring within the desire to earn that glory one day himself.
NEWS
May 7, 1994 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Francisco McLaughlin tried the gold option as a defense, but it didn't work. He also tried to sell the idea that he was a jewelry salesman. That didn't work, either. It took a jury about 30 minutes to convict McLaughlin, 43, of Sheridan Street near Porter, South Philadelphia, of drug charges this week. Common Pleas Judge Edward J. Bradley deferred sentence and set bail at $200,000. During the trial, McLaughlin pulled out gold bars to persuade the jury that he deals in bullion, not drugs.
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Pentagon, accused by some of plundering national treasure, now has marching orders to help find some - a legendary pile of gold bars stacked deep beneath the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. Congress, in recently approving a 1990 defense authorization report, ordered the Army to help "conduct a search for treasure trove in the Victoria Peak region" of the 3,200-square-mile missile range, a no-man's land of unexploded bombs and burned-out tanks and airplane hulks. The Army is to provide the California-based Ova Noss Family Partnership with "transportation, communications, safety and security, ordnance-disposal services, housing and public-affairs assistance" in connection with the partnership's treasure-seeking efforts, the report said.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | By Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
Joseph Rivera, 56, of Winslow, had full-time work ensuring that temp firms complied with state wage and tax laws. But it was his sideline that made it possible for him to afford two Shore homes, real estate in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., a luxury car, and several bars of gold. Federal prosecutors said Rivera accepted $1.86 million in bribes from at least 20 owners and operators of temporary labor firms in return for his official help. Rivera pleaded guilty Wednesday in federal district court in Camden to solicitation and acceptance of a bribe and tax evasion.
SPORTS
September 24, 2007
THERE IS a bull market in gold. The dollar is dropping faster than Jon Kitna's pocket protection. The fiat money that is backed by little more than the "full faith and confidence" of the U.S. government is getting sacked by the mighty Euro and has even been intercepted by the once-humble Canadian "loonie. " What a time to own gold. What a time to own the NFL's "Gold standard franchise," in the opinion of owner Jeffrey Lurie, pro football's Ben Bernanke. The Eagles fell on the Detroit Lions like an armored car filled with gold bars yesterday, officially ending the municipal suicide watch with a prolific, 56-21 flogging that toppled offensive records that began 75 years ago. That was when Bert Bell and Lud Wray risked commitment to an institution by buying the franchise for $25,000 after failing with the Frankford Yellowjackets.
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This story was updated at 11 a.m. Monday A federal judge has upheld a 2011 jury decision that a Philadelphia family who found 10 purloined gold coins, worth at least $7.59 million each, cannot keep them. The coins, "double eagle" $20 gold pieces, were among 445,500 produced by the Philadelphia Mint in 1933 but never circulated because the federal government that year outlawed the possession of gold coins. "The disputed Double Eagles were not lawfully removed from the United States Mint and . . . remain the property of the United States," Federal District Judge Legrome D. Davis wrote in his Aug. 29 judgment, upholding a decision made by a federal court jury in July, 2011.
NEWS
January 13, 2013 | By Kamran Jebreili, Associated Press
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates - Dubai is sometimes called the City of Gold because of its stunning growth from a sleepy Persian Gulf port to a world-famous business crossroads in the space of a single generation. Its nickname has a literal meaning for traders in the precious metal. The city is building itself up as a center for the gold trade, between sources in Africa and consumers in the rising economies of China and India. Dubai now has about a 29 percent market share of global gold trade with nearly 1,200 tons - worth about $41 billion - changing hands at the city's gold markets, according to the gold industry website bullionstreet.com.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Pollen, the globe-hopping doctor who admitted using fake identities and phony passports to dodge IRS investigators, was such a master at hiding his income that it may take three days of testimony to determine just how much he cheated on his taxes. Pollen, 68, pleaded guilty in May to income tax evasion and could be sentenced to as much as 20 years in prison when a sentencing hearing, which began yesterday, ends in U.S. District Court in Camden. Pollen, a former orthopedic surgeon from North Jersey, was accused of either underreporting his income or failing to pay taxes for a total of 10 years, beginning in 1967.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Sotheby's, the 255-year-old auction house that in 1811 auctioned off Napoleon Bonaparte's library and in this century fetched $78 million for Renoir's "Au Moulin de la Galette," has gone on-line. Sotheby's and Amazon.com have joined forces to create a 24-hour cyberspace auction house to offer antiques and expensive collectibles at prices ranging from $100 to more than $150,000 at their sothebys.amazon.com address. The address is offering items in more than 100 collecting categories, among them fine oil paintings, jewelry, watches, silver, furniture, entertainment and sports memorabilia, vintage fashions, coins and photographs.
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NEWS
January 13, 2013 | By Kamran Jebreili, Associated Press
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates - Dubai is sometimes called the City of Gold because of its stunning growth from a sleepy Persian Gulf port to a world-famous business crossroads in the space of a single generation. Its nickname has a literal meaning for traders in the precious metal. The city is building itself up as a center for the gold trade, between sources in Africa and consumers in the rising economies of China and India. Dubai now has about a 29 percent market share of global gold trade with nearly 1,200 tons - worth about $41 billion - changing hands at the city's gold markets, according to the gold industry website bullionstreet.com.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
This story was updated at 11 a.m. Monday A federal judge has upheld a 2011 jury decision that a Philadelphia family that found 10 purloined gold coins worth at least $7.59 million each cannot keep them. The coins, "double eagle" $20 gold pieces, were among 445,500 the Philadelphia Mint produced in 1933 that were never circulated because the federal government that year outlawed the possession of gold coins. "The disputed double eagles were not lawfully removed from the United States Mint and . . . remain the property of the United States," U.S. District Judge Legrome D. Davis wrote in his Aug. 29 judgment, upholding the decision of a federal court jury in July 2011.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - The price of gold, which has climbed for years like a blood-pressure reading for anxious investors, plunged Wednesday to its lowest level in three months. Gold fell almost $58 to $1,614 per ounce. It has declined 15 percent since September, when it hit a peak of $1,907. It had more than doubled since the financial crisis three years earlier. Surprisingly, the fall came on an ugly day in the stock market - the Dow Jones industrial average lost 125 points. Last year, a day like Wednesday would have caused fearful investors to buy gold as a protective investment.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | By Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
Joseph Rivera, 56, of Winslow, had full-time work ensuring that temp firms complied with state wage and tax laws. But it was his sideline that made it possible for him to afford two Shore homes, real estate in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., a luxury car, and several bars of gold. Federal prosecutors said Rivera accepted $1.86 million in bribes from at least 20 owners and operators of temporary labor firms in return for his official help. Rivera pleaded guilty Wednesday in federal district court in Camden to solicitation and acceptance of a bribe and tax evasion.
LIVING
May 15, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Four sales next week will offer auctiongoers opportunities to bid on fine Eastern carpets, Pennsylvania-related WPA art, antiques by the carload, and a chance to venture into the commodities market. The commodities adventure will be provided by Pook & Pook Inc. at its Variety Auction next Friday at its gallery in Downingtown. Among the 850 lots, to be offered beginning at 9 a.m., are two gold bars, each weighing one kilo (2.2 pounds). During Franklin D. Roosevelt's presidency, it became illegal for U.S. citizens to own gold, except in token quantities as jewelry.
SPORTS
September 24, 2007
THERE IS a bull market in gold. The dollar is dropping faster than Jon Kitna's pocket protection. The fiat money that is backed by little more than the "full faith and confidence" of the U.S. government is getting sacked by the mighty Euro and has even been intercepted by the once-humble Canadian "loonie. " What a time to own gold. What a time to own the NFL's "Gold standard franchise," in the opinion of owner Jeffrey Lurie, pro football's Ben Bernanke. The Eagles fell on the Detroit Lions like an armored car filled with gold bars yesterday, officially ending the municipal suicide watch with a prolific, 56-21 flogging that toppled offensive records that began 75 years ago. That was when Bert Bell and Lud Wray risked commitment to an institution by buying the franchise for $25,000 after failing with the Frankford Yellowjackets.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Sotheby's, the 255-year-old auction house that in 1811 auctioned off Napoleon Bonaparte's library and in this century fetched $78 million for Renoir's "Au Moulin de la Galette," has gone on-line. Sotheby's and Amazon.com have joined forces to create a 24-hour cyberspace auction house to offer antiques and expensive collectibles at prices ranging from $100 to more than $150,000 at their sothebys.amazon.com address. The address is offering items in more than 100 collecting categories, among them fine oil paintings, jewelry, watches, silver, furniture, entertainment and sports memorabilia, vintage fashions, coins and photographs.
SPORTS
August 31, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Frankie Fredericks of Namibia edged double Olympic gold medalist Michael Johnson to win the 200 meters yesterday at the ISTAF Grand Prix meet in Berlin. Fredericks, who finished second behind Johnson when the American ran a world record time of 19.32 seconds at the Atlanta Games, powered home in the final 100 meters to win in 19.97. Johnson, who achieved a historic double in Atlanta by becoming the first man to win the 200 and 400 at the same Olympics, was timed in 20.02. "I came here to Berlin not to lose," Fredericks said.
NEWS
October 5, 1994 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge sentenced George L. Funkhouser 3d of Newtown yesterday to 10 years in prison, ordered him to pay his victims nearly $1 million, and labeled him a pathological liar likely to commit more crimes. Funkhouser, who owns Wolf's Lair, a war-games camp in New Milford, Pa., pled guilty in December to a range of crimes including intricate gold and silver scams. Agents from the FBI and IRS say he swindled more than 150 people out of $1.6 million. Minutes before the sentence was pronounced by U.S. District Judge Lowell A. Reed Jr., Funkhouser, 42, apologized for his deeds.
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