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Golden Arches

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NEWS
June 15, 1995 | By Jordana Horn, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Along Route 202, New Britain's landscape speaks of the countryside in a moderate tone, punctuated by quiet, single-family homes, schools and a shopping center. Make way for the golden arches. At a conditional use hearing Tuesday night, the New Britain Borough Council approved the McDonald's corporation's application to construct a drive-through restaurant at the Town Center mall. The restaurant will be constructed sometime in the next month, in what is currently a parking lot. The land-development approval was granted when attorney Kristen Maneval, representing McDonald's, amended the corporation's previous request so that it no longer included a playground, which had drawn opposition at a May conditional-use hearing.
NEWS
February 27, 1987 | By Edward Power, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flanked by the gilt-edged facade of a furrier's shop and the chrome and neon interior of a fashionable hair salon, the restaurant with the circus- yellow arches seemed an especially ironic target for a protest. And that irony was not lost on at least one speaker. "The golden arches of McDonald's are certainly not golden arches for those people working for the minimum wage," Thomas Paine Cronin, president of District Council 47 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, said yesterday.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
BARBIE'S GOING ARCTIC IN COLORFUL LAPP COSTUME Just as Sports Illustrated's swimsuit issue is hitting the stands, one of our favorite dolls appears headed in a totally different direction. Word is that a Swedish artist hopes to clothe America's Barbie doll in the colorful costume of her country's indigenous Sami, or Lapp, people. Maj-Britt Larsson hit upon the idea after her dolls' clothes were an enormous success at a winter market in Jokkmokk, at the foot of the mountains of Lapland just inside the Arctic Circle.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Radnor Township commissioners want to tone down the golden arches of McDonald's and restrict multicolored outdoor signs, a proposal that some argue would eliminate Christmas lights. The commissioners spent more than an hour Monday night fending off criticism of a proposed ordinance that was decried by merchants and other business people, who said the restrictions would cause them economic harm. Under the proposed tougher sign ordinance, "illuminated tubing or strings of lights which outline roof lines, doors, windows, wall edges or rows of vehicles when used for advertising purposes" would be prohibited.
NEWS
November 19, 1997
Advertising is everywhere. On the sides of buses, trailing in the skies behind airplanes, on the uniforms of our athletes, in the names of our stadiums and arenas. The economy is good, but anxiety about money continues. Thousands of men and women in the Philadelphia area either cannot find jobs or have jobs that are low-paying. Today, let's focus on the men and on new entrepreneurial opportunities. A lot of men are bald, or, to be kinder, have thinning hair. A lot of those folliclely deprived men could use some extra income.
NEWS
January 3, 1987
In regard to the flap over Fievel Mousekewitz and his seduction into a Christmas stocking by McDonald's, The Inquirer has taken a firm editorial stand in the Dec. 18 issue: "Putting the Jewish mouse on the Christian ornament took cultural understanding a step too far. Caught up in its own mission to promote good feeling beneath its unifying golden arches, McDonald's failed to recognize that certain distinctions are immune to blurring. " May I suggest certain Christian distinctions also are immune to blurring?
NEWS
March 31, 1997 | by Paul Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Meet Phil Knight, the mastermind behind Nike who made the swoosh as recognizable as the golden arches. Knight started selling running shoes out of the trunk of his car. The business came to be called Nike, which in Greek mythology is the goddess of victory. The famous swoosh was designed by a graphic-arts student, who was paid less than $100. Today, Knight's personal fortune is estimated at $5.2 billion, making him one of the six richest Americans. The Sporting News called him the second most powerful man in sports, behind only Dick Ebersol, president of NBC Sports.
NEWS
March 6, 2004
Before biting into why McDonald's recently decided to put its super sizes on a diet, let's all give a hearty "I'm lovin' it" to the fast food giant. This week, word leaked the chain was through with the big thing. Soon, say ciao to the Super Size (7 ounce, 610 calories) fries and Super Size (41 ounce, 410 calories) soft drinks at 13,000 McDonald's outlets in the United States. The changes are part of a nutritional transformation so radical, you wonder whether there soon will be ads showing Ronald McDonald doing Pilates.
LIVING
February 4, 1994 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
As soon as Troy, 4, spots the golden arches, he shouts out his order. Never mind that he's still a block from the drive-in window. He's ready for action now whenever the subject is food. When he hears pots and pans rattling in the kitchen, he draws up a chair and looks ready. Then he jumps down and gets out the silverware so whoever is cooking can keep working - especially if he knows pizza or macaroni and cheese is on the menu. This little charmer, with dimples and a happy smile, is doing well in preschool.
NEWS
July 31, 1986 | By Michael Kimmelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ray Kroc, the late chairman of McDonald's, didn't want any of his billions and billions of customers to stick around. An order of fries, a shake and a burger should be delivered within 50 seconds, Kroc insisted. (Burger King, that Avis of fast-food businesses, tried to bring the limit down to 15 seconds.) It should be eaten just as quickly. Attract them to the place with the eye-catching golden arches - but get them out of there fast, Kroc believed. Decorate the restaurant in unsettling colors and provide uncomfortable chairs and nothing to keep them hanging around - no phone booths, no newspaper boxes and no pinball machines or jukeboxes; the last thing Kroc wanted was a bunch of rowdy teenagers turning his feeding stations into social clubs.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 3, 2014
Park, not a mall We should be grateful that City Council President Darrell L. Clarke was not around when Alexander Calder designed the Swann Memorial Fountain sculpture. With Clarke involved, we might have the Golden Arches in Logan Square. LOVE Park - where Clarke envisions several restaurants - is another city treasure and the entrance to our magnificent Parkway. It should be designed by architects with vision. Restaurants would create hangouts and crime. Also, the money now foolishly spent for summer entertainment could be used for park maintenance.
NEWS
May 9, 2013
CHARLES RAMSEY looks more homeless than heroic. But the animated dishwasher in the grubby white T-shirt is America's man of the moment thanks to his quick actions earlier this week that led to the freeing of four kidnap victims in Ohio. I'll bet his phone is ringing right now with offers from the "David Letterman Show," "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon" and "The Steve Harvey Show. " Last I checked, Ramsey - not to be confused with the Philly police commissioner by the same name - was trending on Twitter.
NEWS
April 26, 2011
By Bill Bonvie The depiction of a knock-off Statue of Liberty on the U.S. Postal Service's new "forever" stamp has been called a "case of mistaken identity. " But the substitution of a Las Vegas casino's replica for the actual icon in New York Harbor couldn't be more symbolically suited to the United States of today. A century ago, that welcoming statue might well have represented the aspirations of those tired, poor, huddled masses yearning to breathe free, who believed this country offered everyone a chance to strive for a decent standard of living.
NEWS
February 23, 2008 | By SOLOMON JONES
I'VE DECIDED that my 3-year-old son Solomon is a genius. No, he hasn't come up with a new theory of relativity. He hasn't developed a cure for cancer, either. Heck, he can't even read yet. So what is it that has me convinced of his superior mental ability? He told us that he doesn't want to grow up. At first, I thought Peter Pan made him say it. After all, Little Solomon has repeatedly watched the digitally restored, remastered, new and improved version of the original Disney classic (which looks a lot like the unrestored, unremastered, unimproved version that I watched when I was a kid)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Morgan Spurlock begins his bold dietary adventure - and his movie, Super Size Me - as fit as a fiddle, a strapping New Yorker in what his doctors deem to be "outstanding health. " A documentary filmmaker, Spurlock has decided to go on a one-month regimen of nothing but McDonald's: It's McMorning, McNoon and McNight. Super Size Me, the chronicle of Spurlock's 30-day descent into artery-clogging heck, is at once hugely entertaining - and hugely scary. And huge is the operative word.
NEWS
March 6, 2004
Before biting into why McDonald's recently decided to put its super sizes on a diet, let's all give a hearty "I'm lovin' it" to the fast food giant. This week, word leaked the chain was through with the big thing. Soon, say ciao to the Super Size (7 ounce, 610 calories) fries and Super Size (41 ounce, 410 calories) soft drinks at 13,000 McDonald's outlets in the United States. The changes are part of a nutritional transformation so radical, you wonder whether there soon will be ads showing Ronald McDonald doing Pilates.
NEWS
August 27, 2002
By Mary Oves Smithville in Galloway Township, Atlantic County, has long been known for its small-town charm, rural roots, and ability to move at a more leisurely pace. Recently, Smithville residents fiercely opposed the erection of a McDonald's restaurant and won the battle when the township government voted it down. That move was the opposite of what happened in Harrison Township, Gloucester County, where the town government this month ended a 20-year ban against drive-through restaurants to allow construction of a McDonald's.
SPORTS
June 10, 2001 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They call Todd MacCulloch "Big Mac. " And when these NBA Finals began it seemed like an appropriate nickname because, surely, Shaquille O'Neal would consume him for lunch. But, like the rest of his 76ers teammates, MacCulloch's heart seems to have been super-sized. So whenever he had the ball during Game 2 and O'Neal stuck a big hand in his Mac-ribs, leaned his 330 pounds into him, and dared MacCulloch to try to loft one over his golden arches, the Sixers backup center didn't shake.
NEWS
July 30, 2000 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was no breeze, not even a riffle in the awnings, as Paolo Saturnini marched through the near-empty piazza smiling and breathing in the scents of curing boar meat, leather, pesto, pecorino cheese, and hints of the geraniums and rhododendrons blooming on balconies. Shutters were closed for the afternoon siesta. A few tourists sat around beer glasses in the shade. The guys at Paolo Cozzi's barber shop were snoozing. The last of the church ladies headed home. From the vineyards to the olive groves, life was still and quiet.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Turns out that the height of pop music success isn't the power to make young girls scream or to sell 18 million CDs. "The best reason to go into the business is for the free food," said Justin Timberlake (curly blond hair), the most screamed-at member of pop phenom 'N Sync. "This is something you dream of as a kid - being with McDonald's," said JC Chasez (spiky brown hair). "Our pictures are on the cups and the fry box," exclaimed an incredulous Joey Fatone (spiky brown hair, red highlights, goatee)
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