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SPORTS
June 26, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
This weekend, as they visit their ancient homeland for an interleague series with the Phillies, the Oakland Athletics will enter a baseball atmosphere that has been as rare in Philadelphia as inspired civic leadership. Once a sports afterthought in a market the Eagles came to dominate, the Phillies have become a Philadelphia phenomenon, a wildly popular amalgam of red, white, and gold. Citizens Bank Park is sold out for the three-game series with Oakland, packed with jersey-wearing fans whose passions have been inflamed by a Phillies team that since 2007 has won four consecutive National League East titles, two pennants, and a World Series.
SPORTS
August 3, 2006 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pat Williams drove his car through the gates of Erdenheim Farm and, almost too breathless to speak, told his boss, F. Eugene Dixon Jr., that he had a chance to obtain the great Julius Erving for the 76ers. "Fitz, Julius Erving is available," Williams, the team's general manager, said on that mid-October day in 1976. "Pat, who is Julius Erving?" Mr. Dixon asked. "Fitz, he's the Babe Ruth of basketball," Williams replied. No one would have mistaken Mr. Dixon for a basketball aficionado.
NEWS
April 20, 2003 | By Sudarsan Raghavan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All around retired teacher Mowaffuk Abdul Ghani last week were signs that war-shattered Basra was returning to its old, proud self. The markets were bustling, the traders were hawking, and the men were sipping brown tea at a corner stand. But ask Abdul Ghani about the Basra he would like to see again and he will take you back, way back, to a time when casinos dotted the Corniche, an avenue along the Shatt al Arab river, and when theaters and artists thrived in the city. When Saddam Hussein was not around.
SPORTS
April 16, 2009 | By DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
Before television discovered college basketball, before conferences were invented for television and the NCAA Tournament became a 3-week extravaganza, the Big 5 was so meaningful that one of the great broadcasters of the 20th century once referred to his 7 years as its voice as being "right there at the top. " Les Keiter, who coined phrases like "in again, out again Finnegan," "tickles the twine" and "ring-tailed howitzer" and opened his Palestra broadcasts...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2005 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
Rare is the compact disc cover that draws you to a recording like the classic album art of years past. But there's something alluring about the distressed-looking 5-by-5 1/2-inch Digipak cover to the eponymous debut from A Girl Called Eddy, the nom de pop of Jersey Shore native and former Philly resident Erin Moran. We see an out-of-focus city skyline in the background, and the worn impression of a slab of vinyl encircling a side-profile shot of Moran, whose raven hair and parka obscure her sympathetic visage.
SPORTS
February 5, 2002 | Dick Weiss New York Daily News Formerly of the Philadelphia Daily News
When I think of Philadelphia basketball, I'll always think of the Palestra, because that's where I grew up. I used to take the bus and the el into West Philadelphia every Wednesday and Saturday night to watch Big 5 doubleheaders with five, six kids from St. Bernadette's CYO. We used to pay $3 to sit in the west stands. I missed Guy and Hal Lear of Temple - the best backcourt ever to play in the city. They were a little before my time. But I got a chance to experience the Big 5 in all of its glory from 1961 through 1972.
NEWS
September 29, 2003
THE LAST GAME has been played and the tributes have been paid. Soon the concrete bowl in South Philadelphia - the latest in stadium fashions 32 years ago - will disappear from sight, if not from memory. Few are sorry to see it go. Veterans Stadium was a hard place to get excited about. But when all is said and done - and just about all has - there is this epitaph: If all you were interested in was seeing a baseball game, Veterans Stadium was a pretty good place to watch one. The sight lines were good.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN THE MAN from Philadelphia arrived in Las Vegas, the city was starting to wake up. Casinos were being built, but the Mafia had too much influence, and Bugsy Siegel had just been slain. Nevertheless, the period of the early 1950s was called the "Golden Era" because the potential was not just a glint in the eyes of a few rich men. It was real. Alvin "Al" Benedict, a Central High School grad and Rutgers swimming champ, arrived in town and eventually became a casino executive who helped some of those rich men get richer.
NEWS
October 8, 2010
A fan who witnessed Roy Halladay's no-hitter Wednesday night tried to put the feat into perspective during the ride home on the Broad Street line. He couldn't find the right words, and admitted Halladay's performance had left him "speechless. " "It's a great time to be a Phillies fan," the fan said finally. It's a great time, and a lot of fun, as Halladay would say. The pitcher's achievement was another dramatic reminder of how lucky Phillies fans have become. How remarkable was Halladay's no-hitter?
SPORTS
May 3, 1991 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Neal Pilson, the president of CBS Sports, insists the future of TV sports still reflects a healthy glow. But he thinks some top TV sports people will be involved only on a part-time basis. Pilson, in town earlier this week to speak at a luncheon, said the networks are moving toward cost-saving "seasonality" employment. "I think you'll see a cadre of people who will work year-round," he said. "That could be a substantial number: It just depends on what your schedule is. The networks already are experiencing that you run into periods of time where you just don't have enough on your plate.
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SPORTS
February 4, 2015 | Stan Hochman, Daily News Columnist
JIM BUNNING'S account of the voting on Golden Era candidates for the Hall of Fame raises some serious issues about the process. We've narrowed it down to eight questions and when we get some honest answers we will print them. * Who chooses the candidates? * Who chooses the voters and what criteria is used? * Why include writers on the voting panel when the committee is supposedly designed to judge players the writers rejected for 15 years? * Why tell the voters they can only vote for as many as four candidates, why not six or eight or 10?
SPORTS
November 1, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
DICK ALLEN, a former MVP and seven-time All-Star, was announced as one of the 10 candidates eligible for induction to the National Baseball Hall of Fame through a veterans committee. Any candidate that receive votes on 75 percent of the ballots cast by the 16-member Golden Era Committee will earn election into the hallowed halls of Cooperstown. This winter, the veterans committee is selecting from players and executives whose contributions came during the "Golden Era," from 1947-72.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN THE MAN from Philadelphia arrived in Las Vegas, the city was starting to wake up. Casinos were being built, but the Mafia had too much influence, and Bugsy Siegel had just been slain. Nevertheless, the period of the early 1950s was called the "Golden Era" because the potential was not just a glint in the eyes of a few rich men. It was real. Alvin "Al" Benedict, a Central High School grad and Rutgers swimming champ, arrived in town and eventually became a casino executive who helped some of those rich men get richer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Rick Bentley, THE FRESNO BEE
It's another week of slim pickings with new DVD releases. Howdy Kids: Saturday Afternoon Western Roundup, Grade B-plus : If you grew up in the 1950s, then this is a three-DVD set you have to own. It's a fun trip back to Saturdays when heroes - who rode horses, flew planes, and even got around in a jeep - ruled the television airwaves. There are 25 episodes of live-action programming originally designed to entertain children. Included are episodes of The Lone Ranger , The Range Rider , The Rifleman , The Adventures Of Rick O'Shay, Fury, The Roy Rogers Show, Annie Oakley, The Adventures of Kit Carson, The Adventures of Champion, The Cisco Kid, Sergeant Preston of the Yukon, Sky King, Red Ryder, and Buffalo Bill Jr. Everyone will find a favorite, but two of the standouts are Sky King - whose hero battled bad guys using an airplane - and Sergeant Preston of the Yukon - whose companion was King, a dog billed as a husky but that was really an Alaskan malamute.
SPORTS
May 24, 2012 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
THEY SAY that what happens in Las Vegas stays in Las Vegas. So if boxing manager Doc Nowicki and the trio of Philadelphia fighters he has in his corner do what they believe they can next month, they might be looking to make an extended stay out west. "If we win all three fights, we might just stay in Vegas for a month and celebrate," Nowicki said Tuesday at Joe Hand Boxing Gym. Philadelphia has too rich and storied of a history in boxing to deem any single event as the biggest, but if things go according to plan June 9, 2012 will become a memorable date.
SPORTS
December 18, 2011 | By Bill Lyon, For The Inquirer
Back in those grainy black-and-white days, back in the late 1940s, you could still get up and run if you'd been tackled. So naturally, piling on was a commonplace tactic, like pinning butterflies to a board. And where you never, ever wanted to be was on the bottom of one of those piles, where everyone was busily gouging, pinching, biting, and otherwise committing all manner of indignities. You'd look down and there would be a tackler gnawing on your ankle like a berserk beaver.
SPORTS
June 26, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
This weekend, as they visit their ancient homeland for an interleague series with the Phillies, the Oakland Athletics will enter a baseball atmosphere that has been as rare in Philadelphia as inspired civic leadership. Once a sports afterthought in a market the Eagles came to dominate, the Phillies have become a Philadelphia phenomenon, a wildly popular amalgam of red, white, and gold. Citizens Bank Park is sold out for the three-game series with Oakland, packed with jersey-wearing fans whose passions have been inflamed by a Phillies team that since 2007 has won four consecutive National League East titles, two pennants, and a World Series.
SPORTS
March 29, 2011 | By PAUL HAGEN, hagenp@phillynews.com
U.S. Route 1 famously starts at Mile Marker 0 in Key West, Fla., a map dot where countless tourists over the years have cheesed into the camera to prove to the world that they were there. The mighty Mississippi River begins its long, meandering journey at Lake Itasca, Minn. The first day of spring was March 20. If only it was that simple to nail down the precise moment when a downtrodden baseball franchise finally bottoms out and begins the ascent that finally culminates in its golden era, the exact spot where its history pivots toward unprecedented, sustained success.
SPORTS
December 30, 2010
TO HEAR SOME people tell it, former middleweight contender "Bad" Bennie Briscoe, who was 67 when he died Tuesday, had the misfortune of coming along too soon. Then again, maybe he didn't. It just might be that the much younger, much richer and much more widely exposed fighters, those select few pay-per-view attractions that the public is familiar with today, came along too late. "Bennie's best work was done between the two eras of television, the end of the 'Friday Night Fights' in 1964 and the start of ESPN, HBO and the cable revolution of the 1980s," said J Russell Peltz, who was Briscoe's promoter from 1969 to '82, the last 13 years of a remarkable 21-year professional career that isn't nearly as celebrated now as it should be. "He never got the kind of purses and attention that fighters like Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather get today.
SPORTS
December 14, 2010 | By MIKE KERN, kernm@phillynews.com
Former Temple football coach Al Golden began the next phase of his career yesterday, some 1,500 miles south of North Broad Street. He spoke for 10 minutes and answered questions for another 20. He did not mention Temple once by name. The lone reference was historical. "I told [his wife Kelly] 5 years ago there would be a day like this," Golden said. Five years ago, he was being introduced in his first head-coaching job. This time, he called it a dream job. Can you blame him?
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