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Golden Gate Bridge

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NEWS
May 27, 2012 | By Michelle Locke and For The Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO — The Golden Gate Bridge is turning 75 on May 27. And what a historic span it's been. Big, bold, and orange, the bridge is a beloved symbol of San Francisco and one of the most instantly recognizable landmarks in the world. But for all its photogenic qualities, the bridge is uniquely accessible. You can drive across, walk across, bike across, sail beneath it, even scream over it in a daring display of aerial acrobatics. (OK, to do that, you'd have to be in the Navy's Blue Angels flying squad during Fleet Week.)
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By John S. Marshall, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Crowds gathered along San Francisco's waterfront Sunday, while San Francisco Bay was crowded with pleasure boats, tug boats, and other vessels as the city celebrated the 75th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge. Tens of thousands of people were expected to flock to the area to enjoy a number of events taking place along a section of waterfront stretching from Fort Point south of the bridge to Pier 39 along the Embarcadero. Several thousand people had gathered along the waterfront by afternoon, said Mary Currie, public affairs director for the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District.
NEWS
May 10, 1987 | By Jane Cope, Special to The Inquirer
Most of the people who gathered in Roebling yesterday have never seen the Golden Gate Bridge, but each felt a special closeness to the span that has become San Francisco's trademark. During the 1930s, the John A. Roebling Steel Co. plant in Roebling - now part of Florence Township, Burlington County - made the steel suspension cables and the main cable that support the Golden Gate Bridge's roadway. And yesterday the people who worked in the plant and lived in the company town built by Charles Roebling, son of the firm's founder, celebrated their own roles in building the bridge.
NEWS
May 31, 1987 | United Press International
THE MOST POPULAR birthday party in San Francisco last week celebrated the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge. But what was designed as a pleasant stroll across the famous span turned into three hours of gridlock. More than 250,000 well-wishers attended the party, which began at dawn last Sunday, and the weight of the humanity flattened the arched deck.
NEWS
March 23, 1993 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Paul J. Luyber Sr., 84, whose life was a part of Roebling history, died Friday at Rancocas Hospital in Willingboro. He worked for the former John A. Roebling Steel Co., which supplied the steel cables for the Golden Gate Bridge, in San Francisco, and the George Washington Bridge, in New York, and personally worked on both bridges. He owned and operated the Roebling movie theater during the 1940s and 1950s, and in his later years frequently portrayed Roebling mill and village founder Charles Roebling in plays and at town celebrations.
NEWS
May 24, 1987 | By Susan Yoakum, Special to The Inquirer
Huey Lewis and the News bowed out, but the Pottstown Senior High School Marching Band came through. The organizers of today's celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge suffered many disappointments during the planning stages - big- name acts pulled out, a glitzy $22 million extravaganza had to be scaled back to a modest, old-fashioned million-dollar party with carnival and fireworks. But now, after months of public wondering whether the celebration would be a disaster, the bridge party is in danger of being a success.
NEWS
March 29, 1987 | By Vanessa Herron, Inquirer Staff Writer
News flash: Huey Lewis has backed out of a big San Francisco concert celebrating the 50th birthday of the Golden Gate Bridge, and he's being replaced by a hot new act - the Pottstown Senior High School Marching Band. Concert promoter Bill Graham last week walked out of the May 24 celebration, taking headliners Tony Bennett, Huey Lewis and the Grateful Dead with him. Word had it, the only act left would be the Pottstown marching band, which was invited in January because the town had produced most of the steel for the massive bridge.
NEWS
November 7, 2001
Dear John: What a day. My daughter Rachel traveled to San Francisco on a field trip with her class. It was strange. The original announcements of the bridge threats in California had given us a seven-day time frame, from 11/2 to 11/9 (which is, by the way, the opposite of 9/11). Despite all the warnings, everyone decided to go anyway. We all thought, "Well, does that seven-day frame mean the the threat will somehow be less in seven days? When will the threats end? Do we stop moving around, again crippling an already taxed economy?"
NEWS
September 15, 1997 | By Julianne Malveaux
This is one in a series of op-ed pieces from the Progressive Media Project providing commentary from leading African-American voices. I can't walk into an all-white-male room without my stomach lurching. We supposedly live in a diverse and pluralistic society, one in which African-Americans, Latinos, Asian-Americans, Native Americans and whites should participate fully and equally in the making of policy and decisions. To walk into an all-white-male room is to be reminded of the ways that scarce resources like power and decision-making have been concentrated in white male hands.
NEWS
February 12, 1987 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
It may not rival the Golden Gate Bridge of San Francisco in size and appearance, but the Northwestern Avenue Bridge of Springfield Township is about to mark an important milestone. While the famed Golden Gate is about to celebrate its 50th anniversary, the Northwestern Avenue Bridge is about to mark its centennial. But, unlike the West Coast bridge, no celebration is planned for the Springfield span. It has been closed since June because of structural deterioration. And by next year, when the bridge officially would turn 100, it will have been replaced.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Allison Steele and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
Police descended on the quiet, narrow 1700 block of Naudain Street in Center City shortly after noon Monday, searching for evidence in the grisly slaying of a pediatrician who was found in her basement, her ankles and wrists bound behind her back, her body on fire. Authorities did not release the woman's name Monday night, but police sources identified her as the homeowner, Melissa Ketunuti, who worked at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and was 35. Police were waiting for an autopsy to determine the cause of death, but Chief Inspector Scott Small said that there were no obvious signs of gunshot or stab wounds.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By John S. Marshall, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Crowds gathered along San Francisco's waterfront Sunday, while San Francisco Bay was crowded with pleasure boats, tug boats, and other vessels as the city celebrated the 75th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge. Tens of thousands of people were expected to flock to the area to enjoy a number of events taking place along a section of waterfront stretching from Fort Point south of the bridge to Pier 39 along the Embarcadero. Several thousand people had gathered along the waterfront by afternoon, said Mary Currie, public affairs director for the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District.
NEWS
May 27, 2012 | By Michelle Locke and For The Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO — The Golden Gate Bridge is turning 75 on May 27. And what a historic span it's been. Big, bold, and orange, the bridge is a beloved symbol of San Francisco and one of the most instantly recognizable landmarks in the world. But for all its photogenic qualities, the bridge is uniquely accessible. You can drive across, walk across, bike across, sail beneath it, even scream over it in a daring display of aerial acrobatics. (OK, to do that, you'd have to be in the Navy's Blue Angels flying squad during Fleet Week.)
NEWS
February 3, 2010 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new, $300 million toll bridge on I-95 over the Delaware River might not have room for bikes or pedestrians. The 180-foot-wide replacement Scudder Falls Bridge, between Lower Makefield Township, Bucks County, and Ewing Township, Mercer County, is to have nine lanes for auto and truck traffic (up from the current four), two 14-foot-wide dedicated lanes for buses, and two 12-foot-wide shoulders. But a walkway on the bridge, which crosses over canal paths on both the Pennsylvania and New Jersey sides of the river and would offer the only pedestrian river crossing for 12 miles, might be prohibitively expensive, says the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission, which will build and operate the bridge.
NEWS
November 16, 2009 | By Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When heavy trucks rumble across the Burlington-Bristol Bridge, new sensors detect the stresses they put on the 2,300-foot span and instantly transmit the information to computers in Philadelphia. Drexel University researchers in the city then use the stream of data to develop computer models that display the bridge's condition and its potential problems. Such measures, known to engineers as structural health monitoring, are commonly done for a limited period and confined to academic research.
NEWS
April 8, 2008 | Inquirer wire services
Three members of the group Students for a Free Tibet scaled San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge yesterday to protest China's crackdown in Tibet. The three unfurled banners saying "Free Tibet 2008" and "One World, One Dream, Free Tibet. " The slogan for the August Olympics in Beijing is "One World, One Dream. " The protesters later climbed down. In all, seven were charged with conspiracy and causing a public nuisance, with the three climbers facing additional charges of trespassing, said Mary Ziegenbien of the California Highway Patrol.
NEWS
July 19, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John J. Branigan, 84, a construction engineer who supervised the building of bridges across the city, died Sunday at Frankford Hospital-Torresdale Campus following a fall at his Rhawnhurst home. Mr. Branigan started working as an inspector for the Streets Department in 1948. During his 36-year career, he worked his way up to construction engineer in charge of building bridges on Second Street, Chalfont Drive and Whitaker Avenue, and those that link the Airport High Speed Line. He also supervised work on the 58th Street, Walnut Lane and Manayunk Avenue Bridges before retiring in 1984.
NEWS
November 7, 2001
Dear John: What a day. My daughter Rachel traveled to San Francisco on a field trip with her class. It was strange. The original announcements of the bridge threats in California had given us a seven-day time frame, from 11/2 to 11/9 (which is, by the way, the opposite of 9/11). Despite all the warnings, everyone decided to go anyway. We all thought, "Well, does that seven-day frame mean the the threat will somehow be less in seven days? When will the threats end? Do we stop moving around, again crippling an already taxed economy?"
NEWS
September 12, 2001 | By DON RUSSELL russeld@phillynews.com Staff writers Myung Oak Kim and April Adamson and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
FOR A MOMENT, and maybe longer, chaos reigned across our land. "They brought America to our knees and it scares the hell out of me," said Beth Tabler of San Diego, one of the millions of travelers whose plans were sidetracked as rail, air, bridge, tunnel, highway and subway traffic was halted in various sections of the country. Bits of daily life, from the critical to the mundane, were shattered by the horrific explosions at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. U.S. forces worldwide were put on "Threat Con Delta" - the highest level of alert.
SPORTS
January 5, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
If you doubt whether Chris McShea has patience, let him tell you about the architecture class he's taking at La Salle High. McShea and his classmates do not whip out pencils and, voila, turn in blueprints five minutes later. They . . . take . . . their . . . time. "It's about a month for each one," he said. "It's not easy, but it's fun. "We do houses, buildings, bridges - all that stuff. For everything except the houses - say, the Golden Gate Bridge - we have to make our drawing look like, hopefully, the architect's did. The house is an original creation.
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