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Golden Temple

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NEWS
June 4, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
Sikh militants went on a rampage today in the Golden Temple during an anti-government rally on the second anniversary of the bloody army assault on their holiest shrine. One man was killed and seven people were injured. About 200 militants armed with swords, knives and iron bars began attacking members of a volunteer force guarding the temple as the rally drew to a close. Police and security forces entered the temple complex to break up the melee. But the militants who led the rampage - including the widow of the man shot while assassinating Prime Minister Indira Gandhi - escaped.
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time in many years, the Golden Temple is quiet now except for the sweet sounds of the hymns coming from inside its inner sanctum. There are no armed militants inside the Sikhs' holiest shrine, there are only a handful of police guarding it, and the serenity for which it has always been famous is there as it hasn't been since fundamentalists first moved in during the early '80s. There is only one problem with all this tranquillity: The huge Golden Temple complex is also almost devoid of pilgrims.
NEWS
February 12, 1988 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Armed Sikh militants are once again in total control of the Golden Temple - the Sikhs' holiest shrine - and appear to be preparing for another confrontation with the Indian army. The sprawling temple complex is not being fortified as obviously as in the days of Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale, the firebrand Sikh fundamentalist who turned the shrine into an armed camp and who died in 1984 during the army's bloody assault to retake it. But today, young Sikh militants with AK-47 assault rifles, shotguns and handguns of all kinds roam the complex at will, often carrying their weapons under blankets and robes.
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The battles looked so similar as they began, but they ended with such different results. For the second time in four years, Indian security forces last week laid siege to the Golden Temple - the holiest Sikh shrine - in an effort to expel armed militants who had taken control of it. Gunfire once again replaced the prayer and chanting that normally fill the temple air, and blood once again flowed on the marble walkway surrounding the holy...
NEWS
February 16, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The moderate Sikh leader of Punjab said yesterday that radical Sikhs were waging war against the state and urged the people to deal "a crushing defeat to their enemies in the battle ahead. " Chief Minister Surjit Singh Barnala said in a statewide broadcast: "The fight is between the Punjabis and a handful of traitors to the state. If they continue . . . my government will be constrained to take some harsh steps to deal with the situation. " He said his 4 1/2-month-old government had exercised maximum restraint in dealing with "a small group of criminals" responsible for terrorism.
NEWS
June 17, 1988 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last month, convicted assassin Satwant Singh got married. The ceremony took place in the flowered courtyard of the bride's family farmhouse, here in the flat, rich countryside of Punjab. The bride, Surinder Kaur, wore a colorful wedding gown, photos of the day show, and the demure, blushing look expected of a Sikh bride. She appeared happy as family members and villagers looked on. The feelings of the groom, however, were impossible to guess, since he was not there in person.
NEWS
May 19, 1988 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer United Press International contributed to this article
The second siege of the Golden Temple ended yesterday with the dramatic surrender of dozens of armed Sikh militants who had held out for 10 days against thousands of Indian soldiers. Their weapons left behind and their hands held high, the last 52 militants - including several of the most wanted men in India - filed out of the temple's inner sanctum in view of hundreds of security men, their guns at the ready. The afternoon surrender ended a standoff in which at least 28 militants were killed at the temple, the spiritual center of the bloody Sikh campaign for an independent state of "Khalistan" in the Punjab.
NEWS
July 3, 1988 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nirvair Singh is a Sikh militant, though he does not act the part as a prisoner of the Punjab police. He is a killer. He admits it, saying he shot a man two years ago in his village - shot him as the man's children looked on. The victim, says Nirvair Singh, was about to report him to the police. "But I was small-time," he insisted during a recent interview at the police garrison in Batala, in northern Punjab. "So many killed many more. " Others say Nirvair Singh, 38, was responsible for planning scores of killings.
NEWS
January 27, 1986 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
Army units operating in the northern states of Punjab and Haryana were placed on full alert yesterday and passenger trains in both states were canceled as Sikh militants took control of the Golden Temple in Amritsar for the first time since the 1984 army assault on the shrine. Militant leaders also repudiated their five high priests and "excommunicated" India's Sikh president, threatening a new political crisis in Punjab, where Sikh extremism has grown since 1981. The extremists started gathering at the temple Saturday to begin tearing down and rebuilding a Golden Temple shrine, the Akal Takht, that was damaged in the army attack ordered by Prime Minister Indira Gandhi.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Emboldened by recent successes in his government's war against Sikh separatists in Punjab, Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi yesterday made his first visit to the embattled state since August 1985, offering political concessions and promises of economic development. On the eve of his arrival, the government announced the release of 138 suspected separatists held without trial since June 1984. They were detained during Operation Bluestar, in which troops cleared the Golden Temple in Amritsar of armed Sikh militants in a bloody assault that killed hundreds.
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TRAVEL
February 11, 2013 | By St. John Barned-Smith, Washington Post
I peered over the edge of the Queen's Bath, an immaculate, now-empty pool where the ladies of one of India's great empires once bathed. Then my guide, Kumar, pointed outside. "That's the moat," he said, motioning toward a deep trench ringing the building we were in. "The king filled it with crocodiles so that no one could watch the queen in her bath. " The bath was just one of many amazing buildings that I saw during my visit to Hampi, a small town in the southwestern Indian state of Karnataka.
NEWS
August 7, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - India reacted with grief and outrage Monday at the news that at least six Sikhs were killed when a gunman attacked them the day before in their Wisconsin temple as they prayed and prepared food. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, himself a Sikh, said in a statement that he was shocked and saddened by the news and extended his condolences to the families of the victims. "India stands in solidarity with all the peace-loving Americans who have condemned this violence," he said, adding that he hoped "such violent acts are not repeated in the future.
SPORTS
September 24, 2010 | By Ashley Fox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alfred Golden stood over the boy he had just knocked out. "Get up," he screamed. "Get up! My father's going to kill me. " Golden was 12 years old, playing in a football game dubbed the Friendship Bowl. It was supposed to be a friendly game between teams in Central Jersey. Nothing at stake, not even bragging rights. Just fun. But Golden didn't have an off button. He was an intense, competitive kid. As the youngest of Al and Toni Golden's three sons, he had to be that way to keep up. So even though his father had warned him to "take it easy" because the game was called the Friendship Bowl for a reason, young Alfred couldn't play at half speed.
SPORTS
November 25, 2009 | By MIKE KERN, kernm@phillynews.com
Satisfied? The Temple football team? Just because the Owls (9-2, 7-0 Mid-American Conference) are taking a nine-game winning streak to Ohio University (8-3, 6-1) on Friday morning (ESPNU, 11) to see who will win the conference's East Division and play in next week's title game? "I'm unsatisfied," said coach Al Golden, who inherited a winless team 4 years ago that had just been asked to leave the Big East for a non-BCS affiliate and has taken it from one victory to four, five and now this.
SPORTS
August 8, 2006 | By Kevin Tatum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple football coach Al Golden had a staff of assistants up and running on the day he was hired in December. Then along came his two right-hand men: offensive coordinator George DeLeone and defensive coordinator Mark D'Onofrio. They will be integral as Golden attempts to turn around a program that hasn't had a winning season since 1990. "I think we have a challenge here at Temple that's unique, but every day in college football is challenging," said DeLeone, who, at 58, is the old man on a staff that, without him, would average 33 years of age. Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb credits DeLeone for his development at Syracuse, where DeLeone was offensive coordinator, among other duties, during a 20-year stint with the Orangemen.
SPORTS
August 1, 2006 | By Kevin Tatum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Though the Temple football team won't become a full member of the Mid-American Conference until next season, Owls coach Al Golden and two of his players were in Detroit yesterday for the league's annual media day. With six MAC outings on its schedule - beginning with a season-opening date at Buffalo on Aug. 31 - Temple has the status of an affiliate member this year. And though the Owls can't compete for the league championship, they are eligible to land one of the conference's three bowl berths.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | By Raphael Lewis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
According to the Sikh religion, those who worship at the temple must sit cross-legged on the floor. In India, where cavernous Sikh temples punctuate the landscape with soaring domes and slender minarets, that provision rarely poses a problem. For Upper Darby's 69th Street congregation, however, fitting 300 supplicants into a storefront temple has meant knocking knees. "We have grown up," said Karnail Gyani, a congregant. "We must move soon. " The answer to the problem seems simple: Find a bigger building.
LIVING
April 13, 1997 | By Raphael Lewis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As a child in India, Balbir Singh Jeobalhlia celebrated the Sikh holiday of Vaisakhi by making a pre-dawn pilgrimage to the Golden Temple of Amritsar. Surrounded by the echoing, hypnotic prayers of more than one million supplicants, he would bow before a 24-karat-gold altar, feast on sweet amrati cakes, and exult in his spiritual home. Today, as the annual holiday returns, Jeobalhlia, now 57, will park his taxi on South 69th Street and genuflect before the wooden altar in a storefront temple.
SPORTS
July 16, 1990 | By Dick Weiss, Daily News Sports Writer
Temple gymnast Bill Roth is just making his entrance onto the international stage, but it has not taken long for the 19-year-old sophomore to leave his mark. Roth captured a record five gold medals and two silvers this weekend at the U.S. Olympic Festival, winning the floor exercise, horizontal bar, the parallel bars and vault during individual finals. He was also a member of the East team that won the team competition. He won silvers in the pommel horse and all-around competition.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a solitary confinement cell in Tihar Jail, a 53-year-old Sikh grandfather and former government clerk named Kehar Singh is waiting to be hanged for conspiring to commit the crime of the decade in India - the 1984 assassination of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi. Thus he has waited since his conviction and sentencing in 1986. But many Indians believe - and increasingly have come forward to say - that Kehar Singh is an innocent man. They see him not as a killer, but as a symbol of the hard times today for Sikhs living in Hindu-dominated India, and of how difficult it can be for a Sikh to find justice here.
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