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BUSINESS
March 14, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he was first approached about the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses initiative, Michael Brown was a little skeptical. After all, he already had an MBA from St. Joseph's University and was busy running his own company, Environmental Construction Services Inc. Just how much could he learn from a 12-week program offered free by the investment giant? A lot, it seems. Six months after completing the program at Community College of Philadelphia, Brown credits the knowledge gained with helping to expand his business from four to 32 full-time employees and quadruple his annual revenue.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1998 | Inquirer staff writers, Associated Press, Reuters and Bloomberg News contributed to this article
Goldman Sachs & Co. last night canceled an initial public offering that just two months ago was expected to give the investment bank a $30 billion market value. The firm's top executives, its six-member executive committee, made the decision after consulting with the 189 general partners. Since June, when Goldman's executive committee decided to go public, shares of rivals such as Merrill Lynch & Co. and Morgan Stanley Dean Witter & Co. have fallen as much as 40 percent, and Goldman's third-quarter pretax profits dropped 19 percent.
NEWS
November 30, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank L. Coulson Jr., 65, of Bryn Mawr, a managing director at Goldman Sachs, died Tuesday, Nov. 22, of lung cancer at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore. In 1974, Mr. Coulson joined the Philadelphia office of Goldman Sachs, an investment, banking, and securities firm. He was elected to partnership in 1990 and began a daily commute from the Main Line to the firm's Wall Street office in New York, arriving at 6:30 a.m. He continued to commute until the end of October, said his wife, Sarah Miller Coulson.
NEWS
January 11, 2013
BIG CORPORATE GIFTS almost always make a statement. That was the case Wednesday when Goldman Sachs' executive vice president and chief of staff, John F. W. Rogers, and Hizzoner Mayor Nutter announced that the investment-banking firm would commit $20 million to help small businesses in the region. But a closer look at the statement being made here reveals that the success around the country of the Goldman Sachs program is unclear. Philadelphia will get $10 million to be lent to small businesses and to be administered by the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp.
NEWS
May 4, 2010
Forget women scorned. To truly experience hell's furies, watch a politician in search of a scapegoat when the cameras are rolling. So learned Goldman Sachs executives past and present as they had their reputations and assets kicked - finally, bipartisanship! - by members of the Senate Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Investigations. Not that there's any sympathy for Goldman Sachs. Its role in the financial shenanigans of the last decade is justifiably under scrutiny. The Securities and Exchange Commission has filed a civil suit over deals tied to subprime mortgages, and Thursday the Justice Department launched a criminal investigation.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2006 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Goldman Sachs Group Inc. is widely expected to pluck its next chief executive officer from within, and the most likely candidate is said to be its president and chief operating officer, Lloyd Blankfein. "I would be shocked if it wasn't an internal candidate, and I would be slightly less shocked if it wasn't Lloyd Blankfein," said Jeffery Harte, an analyst at Sandler O'Neill & Partners L.P. Harte said the ascension of Blankfein, 51, would mean little change ahead for the storied Wall Street investment bank.
NEWS
April 24, 2006 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Bradley Abelow has always taken on the jobs that nobody else wanted. At the investment bank Goldman Sachs, that was heading up "non-revenue operations" - in a company all about making money. At the Statehouse, it's taking on the job of state treasurer during one of New Jersey's worst fiscal crises. Like Gov. Corzine, who handpicked his quiet, self-effacing Goldman Sachs deputy for the post, the 47-year-old Abelow could have retired comfortably on his Wall Street fortune instead of turning to government work.
NEWS
May 31, 2006 | By Ron Hutcheson and Kevin G. Hall INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush looked to Wall Street for a new treasury secretary yesterday, nominating Goldman Sachs chairman Henry M. Paulson Jr. for the government's top economic job. If confirmed by the Senate, Paulson will replace John Snow, who has been expected to leave for months. The nomination broke Bush's pattern of relying on captains of industry for economic advice and sent a reassuring signal to financial markets. Paulson is arguably the most influential executive on Wall Street, the market's equivalent of a rock star.
NEWS
July 13, 1999 | By Tom Turcol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With Jon S. Corzine's emergence as a top U.S. Senate contender in New Jersey, allies of former Gov. Jim Florio are escalating their attempt to cast Corzine as a corporate baron who is out of touch with working-class Democrats. Seeking to choke off further gains by Florio's main rival for the Democratic Senate nomination in 2000, a coalition of 25 union officials based primarily in South Jersey called on the party's political and organized labor leadership to reject Corzine's candidacy.
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NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
John C. Whitehead, 92, a Haverford College alumnus who served on the school's Board of Managers for more than 30 years - including 10 years as its chairman - died Saturday, Feb. 7. Mr. Whitehead was described as a "titanic figure in Haverford history" by a school spokesman in announcing his death. He served in the Navy, taking part in the invasions of Normandy, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa. He later became U.S. deputy secretary of state. Mr. Whitehead, who had been diagnosed with cancer, lived in New York City.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A billion dollars still buys a lot of real estate in Philadelphia. That's how much commercial real estate brokers in the Philadelphia office of Jones Lang LaSalle say they sold here in 2014. It was a record for the firm, said executive vice president Doug Rodio . The company claims it is the largest adviser to big building-sellers in the region. Prices are up. See, for example, Radnor Court, the brick-and-glass, 121,000-square-foot complex where Airgas has its headquarters on Radnor-Chester Road, near the Radnor SEPTA station.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
TURNS OUT YOU weren't the only person who got tired of the computer-generated battle scenes in the latter entries of Peter Jackson's "Lord of the Rings" trilogy. Also tired of them: Peter Jackson, who admitted while doing press for "The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies" that he and his effects crew went overboard with artificial orcs in "The Two Towers" and "The Return of the King. " He further conceded that audiences have grown "jaded" with CGI effects in general, and he's certainly right about that.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he was first approached about the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses initiative, Michael Brown was a little skeptical. After all, he already had an MBA from St. Joseph's University and was busy running his own company, Environmental Construction Services Inc. Just how much could he learn from a 12-week program offered free by the investment giant? A lot, it seems. Six months after completing the program at Community College of Philadelphia, Brown credits the knowledge gained with helping to expand his business from four to 32 full-time employees and quadruple his annual revenue.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Money managers stayed away from investing in Europe and other foreign markets after the financial crises there in 2008 and 2011. But at least one changed his mind - and it's working in his favor. Steven Krawick, president and chief investment officer of West Chester Capital Advisors, a unit of AmeriServe (symbol: ASRV) in the fall of 2013 began adding European and Japanese equities to client portfolios. (With variations, typically his clients hold 60 percent stocks and 40 percent bonds.)
NEWS
October 9, 2013
THE U.S. auto industry is thriving, running its factories at triple-shift full capacity, hiring new workers. It's begging auto-parts suppliers for more product, as hiring grows all along the U.S. car-market supply chain, where millions of Americans are employed in the real economy, building and making actual things. Its workers are shopping, buying, paying taxes, funding schools and showing the effect that manufacturing jobs can have in the honest-to-God economy. Even Government Motors, otherwise known as GM, will make a handsome profit this year, and soon the feds will have sold off our stake in the bailed-out automaker, a deal now estimated to cost you, the taxpayer, $10 billion.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
Small-business owners have until July 22 to sign up for the free Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program being offered in September at Community College of Philadelphia. To be eligible for the 11-week program, a business must be at least 2 years old, employ a minimum of four and have an annual revenue stream of $150,000 to $4 million. For more information or to apply, go to www.ccp.edu/10ksb or call 267-299-5900. Goldman Sachs has put up $200 million to fund the program, developed by Babson College and being offered in at least nine cities.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
MIRA NAIR changes much (for the worse) in her adaptation of "The Reluctant Fundamentalist," but she leaves the novel's most provocative passage intact. It's the moment when an Islamist sympathizer explains why, though he was living a privileged life as a Wall Street hotshot, he smiled with awe when he saw the 9/11 massacres on television. Something to do with David hitting Goliath (poor-taste alert). The fellow goes on to say that the collapsing Trade Center buildings represented to him a deflating of American arrogance, perhaps forgetting for a moment that the towers were full of people, including hundreds of foreign nationals, Muslims among them.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
As officials described the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program last week, I was reminded of another educational effort aimed at ongoing enterprises. The U.S. Small Business Administration launched its Emerging Leaders 200, or e200, training program - described as providing MBA-like curriculum to people with little time or money to pursue one - in Philadelphia in 2008. Both programs focus on operating businesses, not start-ups. The required minimum is at least two years in business for the Goldman Sachs effort and three years for e200.
NEWS
January 11, 2013
BIG CORPORATE GIFTS almost always make a statement. That was the case Wednesday when Goldman Sachs' executive vice president and chief of staff, John F. W. Rogers, and Hizzoner Mayor Nutter announced that the investment-banking firm would commit $20 million to help small businesses in the region. But a closer look at the statement being made here reveals that the success around the country of the Goldman Sachs program is unclear. Philadelphia will get $10 million to be lent to small businesses and to be administered by the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp.
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