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Goodfellas

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NEWS
November 22, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
At a certain point in "Casino," Joe Pesci puts a guy's head in a vise and squeezes until an eye pops out. Anyone who witnesses this three-hour thug opera from Martin Scorsese will know exactly how the victim feels. For "Casino" isn't just a three-hour marathon of misbehaving mobsters - it's virtually the same mob marathon Scorsese presented to us five years ago in his definitive gangster saga "GoodFellas. " The same actors (Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci) in the same roles, the same use of music (more Eric Clapton, anyone?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
GoodFellas, Martin Scorsese's Oscar-nominated 1990 epic about mob life on the streets of New York (where else?), stars Robert De Niro - and it's interesting to see the difference between his hopped-up, violent mafioso in this swarming gangster flick and his quiet portrayal of a middle-aged New York cop chasing down his trouble-bound son in the current City by the Sea. And filmgoers can do just that - the compare-and-contrast thing - as the Roxy Theater...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In the last two decades, no genre has been more overcrowded than the mob movie. Scarcely a week goes by, it seems, without images of another whacked hood lying in the trunk of his Lincoln as his former colleagues stand by with the sacks of lime for the summary funeral. To stand out from that crowd is a singular feat, brought off by the perhaps implausible combination of Johnny Depp and Al Pacino in Mike Newell's Donnie Brasco. This ambivalent, sometimes absurdist tale of an FBI undercover agent's infiltration of the New York Mafia in the late '70s may not challenge at the rarefied level of GoodFellas or the Godfather trilogy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Today's multiple-choice question: To relax, Joe Pesci (a) reads War and Peace in under 30 minutes, (b) tries an afternoon of bungee-jumping, (c) juggles bottles of nitroglycerin in his den, or (d) plays a quiet round of golf. Anyone who relishes the roguish gallery of off-the-wall psychos, hyperkinetic hitmen, frenzied fringe-dwellers and turbo-charged talkers with stratospheric blood pressure that Pesci has given us in the last decade will be cruelly disappointed to learn that the right answer is (d)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1991 | By Marc Schogol, Inquirer Staff Writer
So you're figuring on picking up a copy of GoodFellas at your video store this weekend. Well, unless you're one of them, the wiseguys probably will beat you to it. Wiseguys are not mobsters in this case, but serious videophiles who know all the tricks about getting their hands on hot new rental movies as soon as they hit the shelves, such as GoodFellas, released yesterday. Not only do they know the day the video is released, they also know what time of day their local video stores get deliveries and how many copies their store gets.
NEWS
March 11, 1996 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Salvatore Avena: Did I do somethin' wrong? Salvatore Profaci: Well, we started a lawsuit. Goodfellas don't sue goodfellas. . . . Goodfellas kill goodfellas. Of all the quotes on all the tapes from all the conversations made during the FBI's four-year probe of the Philadelphia mob, none compares to New York mob leader Sal Profaci's succinct and chilling explanation picked up by an FBI bug on June 2, 1992, in Sal Avena's Camden law office. Law enforcement authorities say it captured the essence of wiseguy life.
NEWS
April 30, 1998 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Here's how it went down, according to New Jersey law enforcement officials: One reputed mobster agreed to testify against another who had been accused in a civil lawsuit of stealing from a Philadelphia trash-hauling company. Then the first man "abruptly withdrew his assistance," telling a state grand jury that he refused to testify because he didn't believe the allegations were true. The jurors didn't buy it. As a result, Gus "Buddy" Spatafora, 61, of Neptune, Monmouth County, was indicted this week on two counts of perjury and two counts of false swearing, the New Jersey Attorney General's Office said yesterday.
NEWS
August 28, 1998 | by David Bianculli, New York Daily News
Just when you think network television couldn't do any more to erode its audience share, it turns around and does something monumentally stupid, even by its own short-sighted standards. Now comes last week's announcement from CBS that on the night of Sept. 13, while NBC is televising the Emmy Awards, it will offer the broadcast premiere of Martin Scorsese's 1990 Mafia film "GoodFellas. " Why is this such a dumb move? Because it's against the Emmys, that's why. The annual awards show by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences is supposed to celebrate TV's best, and to give viewers the opportunity to share in that celebration.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"GoodFellas" is a movie that savagely and thoroughly obliterates romanticized notions of the Mafia. They are notions that movies have played no small part in creating - Francis Coppola's epic "The Godfather" being a prime example. "GoodFellas" - an epic in its own right that spans 30 years in the lives of three Queens, N.Y., gangsters - is an entirely different kind of movie. While "The Godfather" sought to establish that organized crime empires are built in part on such qualities as honor, loyalty, fraternity and family, "GoodFellas" takes the opposite view - that there is nothing honorable or noble about a group of men who steal and murder for a living.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Me and the Mob, a desperate young author in search of a lucrative true- crime book decides to join the Mafia and write an expose. Unfortunately, there were no wise guys around to cart Frank Rainone off in the trunk of a Lincoln before he made a film out of this daft proposition. Cutting comedies such as Jonathan Demme's Married to the Mob and Andrew Bergman's The Freshman set a standard for contemporary mob humor light years beyond Rainone's puny reach. Add to that the dark wit of Martin Scorsese's masterpiece GoodFellas, and you have further reason why Hollywood should establish the cinematic equivalent of the witness-protection program for pictures as feeble as Me and the Mob. Rainone insists on reminding us how far he has to go by casting Tony Darrow, who played Sonny in GoodFellas, as the writer's uncle in Me and the Mob. Darrow's Tony Bando is right-hand man to a New York mob kingpin, and he persuades the boss to take on his nephew, Jimmy Corona (James Lorinz)
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
The Amish Mafia ? Terrific title, silly show. The idea of a violent gang operating among the Gentle People is immediately intriguing because until now about the worst incidence of intra-Amish crime was a rash of beard-cutting attacks in Ohio. The Amish Mafia is so far from being an expose of organized crime among the Pennsylvania Dutch that it verges on unintentional comedy. In the first five minutes of Tuesday night's pilot, you learn that the Amish church denies the existence of any such group.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
They call him "Uncle Joe," which is both a reference to his age - 73 - and his laid-back style. Mob boss Joe Ligambi is old school, a make-money-not-headlines crime boss who has had a surprisingly long and relatively peaceful run as Philadelphia's Mafia don. But that run may be over. In jail for the last 17 months, Ligambi and six codefendants begin a legal fight for their lives this week when opening arguments are expected in the city's latest organized-crime trial. Ligambi and the others are facing racketeering conspiracy charges built around allegations of illegal gambling, loan-sharking, and extortion that extend back to 1999.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Henry Hill, 69, the New York mobster whose life as a wiseguy and then as a government witness was the basis for the movie Goodfellas , died Tuesday in California. More than any other mob figure in the late 20th century, Hill changed both the perception and the reality of Mafia life in America. His story, first told in the book Wiseguy by Nicholas Pileggi, laid bare the treachery and deceit that was at the core of the underworld. Honor and loyalty, the virtues celebrated in popular fiction like The Godfather , were not part of the life that Hill and his associates lived.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2012 | By Michael Rubinkam, Associated Press
ALLENTOWN - Paul Sorvino might finally be over his trouble with The Trouble with Cali . With $500,000 in taxpayer funding, the first-time director and Goodfellas star shot the independent film in northeastern Pennsylvania six years ago. But the project ran short of cash, and Scranton politicians demanded to know what he did with their investment. Sorvino, in turn, was stunned and hurt that anyone would question his integrity. He's hoping all that's in the past now that his project is about to get its first screening, Tuesday at Arizona's Sedona Film Festival.
NEWS
March 18, 2009 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is a story about politics and strange bedfellows, South Philly-style. It revolves around a young lawyer, Gregory Quigley, snared in a Delaware County mob investigation. And it's causing agita in the campaign of district attorney candidate Seth Williams, a bit player in the drama whose opponents are attempting to smear him and introduce the specter of organized crime, sotto voce, in the D.A.'s race by twisting facts like a soft pretzel. It all began with a $5,000 contribution Quigley made to Williams' campaign back in 2007, long before Quigley's legal problems began.
NEWS
August 24, 2005
OUT OF work? Willing to relocate? There are job opportunities with the Christian Broadcasting Network in Virginia, home to the 700 Club and the lunatic rantings of Christian Coalition founder and former GOP presidential candidate Pat Robertson. The network is looking for HVAC technicians, art directors, truck drivers, reporters, field producers. They're even looking for an in-house dentist. But what Pat Robertson most wants is a hit man. On Monday, Robertson, during a broadcast of his 700 Club show, called on the United States to whack Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, calling him a "terrific danger" to the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
GoodFellas, Martin Scorsese's Oscar-nominated 1990 epic about mob life on the streets of New York (where else?), stars Robert De Niro - and it's interesting to see the difference between his hopped-up, violent mafioso in this swarming gangster flick and his quiet portrayal of a middle-aged New York cop chasing down his trouble-bound son in the current City by the Sea. And filmgoers can do just that - the compare-and-contrast thing - as the Roxy Theater...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2000 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What was Joey DeFrancesco thinking, putting out a record of songs that sound as if they belong on The Sopranos, or a mob movie? The latest record for the Hammond B-3 organ specialist, who has been recording since he was a 17-year-old prodigy, is titled Joey DeFrancesco's Goodfellas (Concord). Among the songs on the record are these: "Tarantella," "O Solo Mio" and "Speak Softly Love," the theme from The Godfather. Fuhgeddaboudit. Or something like that. "It's something I've wanted to do for a while," he said.
SPORTS
September 7, 1999 | by Dick Jerardi , Daily News Sports Writer
David Malatesta's father loved the race track. The son tagged along and "it got in my blood. " Stewart Taub said that, until a couple of years ago, he didn't know the difference between "a filly and a gelding. " The two friends from Delaware decided they wanted to buy a horse together. They called themselves Goodfellas Stable. Two years ago, trainer Tim Ritchey was dispatched to the sales at Timonium, Md., with instuctions to spend "up to $50,000. " Near the end of the sale, Ritchey spotted a tiny yearling colt that he liked.
NEWS
February 25, 1999
Memo to Frank Rizzo Jr. Re: Free Library videos. Subject: What to worry about in an election year. Glad you expressed concern at the City Council about teenagers renting R-rated videos from the library, though demand for Goodfellas and The Untouchables has dropped since their television debut. Your request for a list of all R-rated titles at the library is being met, though it will take a touch longer for the staff to meet your anticipated follow-up plan to screen all 1 million book titles to discern which have too much sex and violence.
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