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BUSINESS
August 7, 2016 | By Joel Naroff
The Democratic National Convention has come and gone. Regardless of your view of the proceedings, there is little doubt the delegates spent a lot of money in the region. But this large a meeting taxed the facilities and resources of the economy. Meeting those demands required calling on the potential supply of goods and services that exists in the new "flex economy. " Unfortunately, resolving the business concerns of competition, regulation, safety, and taxation of these new types of firms has yet to be addressed.
NEWS
March 6, 2001
I don't think rich people deserve a tax cut. It won't significantly add to the rich's ability to contribute to the economy. They already have all the access they need to all the goods and services they want. The tax cuts should go to the poor and middle class because they will buy goods and services. This will, in turn, make companies more money, and that will, in turn, profit the rich - who own these companies. It's already been proven that trickle-down economics don't work. I think it's time we tried trickle-up economics.
NEWS
October 18, 2002
Vibrant communities Philadelphia's community development corporations share Councilmember Goode's excitement about the new public/private economic development partnerships that will begin this fall (OpEd Oct. 10). The "New Philadelphia Plan," as Goode calls it, will bring badly needed resources to many communities to strengthen neighborhood shopping districts and increase access to goods and services. Philadelphia is a city of neighborhoods. Our economic base contains scores of neighborhood commercial strips and neighborhood-based employers of all sizes.
NEWS
June 13, 2005
CITY COUNCIL can be a circus, complete with clowns and ringmasters. But it's important to remember that important and serious business gets conducted there. Case in point: Tomorrow's hearings on a recent report issued by the Brookings Institution that revealed how much more money the poor often pay for goods and services. To create their report, "The Price is Wrong," the Brookings think tank spent a year in Philadelphia investigating the cost of goods and services like cars, car loans and insurance, groceries, check cashing, home loans, real-estate taxes, natural-gas prices, appliances and furniture.
NEWS
October 5, 1986
It is interesting to note the games people play with words. The new tax law is going to "raise the taxes on corporations" and lower the taxes taken from individuals. What is not said is the fact that corporate greed is alive and well. This alters the tax situation - taxes will be increased on corporations and the corporations will promptly raise the prices of their goods and services so their bottom lines are safely restored to the old levels. Very few corporations seem to have a conscience, so the net result of taxing them more heavily will merely result in the opening gun of a new and better round of inflation.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Auction-goers will get a chance to bid on a pair of brass candlesticks, restaurant certificates, prints of Chester County, a clock radio, a bird- feeder, sweatshirts and even a chiropractor's examination. "We also will be auctioning the services of a career counselor. That might be handy right now," said Catherine Palmquist, executive director of the YWCA of Greater West Chester. The YWCA will sponsor its fifth annual Auction of Goods and Services on Saturday. Local businesses and professionals have donated goods and services to benefit YWCA programs.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
We all shop for food, put gas in our cars, pay for medication and doctor's visits, day care and college - and, based on those prices, inflation has got to be higher than what the government says. The Consumer Price Indicator registered a puny 1.7 percent in 2012, according to official figures. Real inflation is in fact higher than that, according to the American Institute for Economic Research's (AIER) Everyday Price Index, which in 2012 revealed almost 8 percent inflation ( www.aier.org/epi )
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Michael Busler
President Obama has become increasingly critical of Mitt Romney's career at the private-equity firm Bain Capital, particularly based on evidence that Bain purchased companies, closed their domestic factories, and opened or contracted with factories overseas to do the same work. This, Obama argues, took jobs from American workers.   Democratic candidate John Kerry raised the same issue in 2004, arguing that increased outsourcing was damaging the U.S. economy and that the Bush administration wanted to "export more of our jobs overseas.
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BUSINESS
August 7, 2016 | By Joel Naroff
The Democratic National Convention has come and gone. Regardless of your view of the proceedings, there is little doubt the delegates spent a lot of money in the region. But this large a meeting taxed the facilities and resources of the economy. Meeting those demands required calling on the potential supply of goods and services that exists in the new "flex economy. " Unfortunately, resolving the business concerns of competition, regulation, safety, and taxation of these new types of firms has yet to be addressed.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
We all shop for food, put gas in our cars, pay for medication and doctor's visits, day care and college - and, based on those prices, inflation has got to be higher than what the government says. The Consumer Price Indicator registered a puny 1.7 percent in 2012, according to official figures. Real inflation is in fact higher than that, according to the American Institute for Economic Research's (AIER) Everyday Price Index, which in 2012 revealed almost 8 percent inflation ( www.aier.org/epi )
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Michael Busler
President Obama has become increasingly critical of Mitt Romney's career at the private-equity firm Bain Capital, particularly based on evidence that Bain purchased companies, closed their domestic factories, and opened or contracted with factories overseas to do the same work. This, Obama argues, took jobs from American workers.   Democratic candidate John Kerry raised the same issue in 2004, arguing that increased outsourcing was damaging the U.S. economy and that the Bush administration wanted to "export more of our jobs overseas.
NEWS
August 14, 2011
Study: Much isn't 'Made in China' LOS ANGELES - Convinced that everything you buy these days has a "Made in China" label? Then you aren't paying attention. Items made in the United States still dominate the American marketplace, according to a study by economists at the San Francisco Federal Reserve. Goods and services from China accounted for only 2.7 percent of U.S. personal consumption spending in 2010, according to the study. About 88.5 percent of U.S. spending last year was on American-made products and services.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2011 | By Martin Crutsinger, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Americans are earning and spending more, but a lot of the extra income is going down their gas tanks. Gas prices have drained more than half the extra cash Americans are getting this year from a cut in Social Security taxes. Unlike some other kinds of spending, paying more for gas doesn't help the economy much. That's because most of the money goes overseas, and higher prices leave people with less money to buy appliances, computers, plane tickets, and other items that can be postponed.
NEWS
October 19, 2010
How to compete with foreign firms? There has been lately a great deal of teeth-gnashing and lamenting over the fact that American businesses are turning to overseas suppliers of goods and services, thereby causing a loss of jobs for many U.S. workers. The obvious fact is that the foreign suppliers are able and willing to provide the needed goods and services at a lower price than their American competitors. So, what could the reason be for the inability of the American companies to compete effectively?
NEWS
July 16, 2010 | By Susan Murphy Casey, McClatchy Newspapers
It never hurts to ask. A department store might have $100 leeway on a chair that hasn't been selling well. Your favorite home contractor might reduce his fee. A store manager trying to sell a pricey appliance could drop the price, waive the delivery fee, or throw in accessories. When hunting for lower prices for home goods and services, "there's more room for negotiation than we normally think," said David Bell, a business professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 13, 2005
CITY COUNCIL can be a circus, complete with clowns and ringmasters. But it's important to remember that important and serious business gets conducted there. Case in point: Tomorrow's hearings on a recent report issued by the Brookings Institution that revealed how much more money the poor often pay for goods and services. To create their report, "The Price is Wrong," the Brookings think tank spent a year in Philadelphia investigating the cost of goods and services like cars, car loans and insurance, groceries, check cashing, home loans, real-estate taxes, natural-gas prices, appliances and furniture.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The U.S. trade deficit widened to a new high of $55.5 billion in October, boosted by a rise in oil prices and record imports from China, as retailers geared up for the holidays. October's large shortfall pushed the deficit for the first 10 months of 2004 to $500.5 billion, surpassing the record of $496.5 billion for all of 2003, Commerce Department figures released yesterday showed. The latest snapshot of trade showed the country's trade imbalance widening by 8.9 percent in October from September - even though U.S. exports registered their best month on record.
NEWS
October 18, 2002
Vibrant communities Philadelphia's community development corporations share Councilmember Goode's excitement about the new public/private economic development partnerships that will begin this fall (OpEd Oct. 10). The "New Philadelphia Plan," as Goode calls it, will bring badly needed resources to many communities to strengthen neighborhood shopping districts and increase access to goods and services. Philadelphia is a city of neighborhoods. Our economic base contains scores of neighborhood commercial strips and neighborhood-based employers of all sizes.
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