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NEWS
May 3, 1994 | BY DAVE BARRY
Today's consumer topic is: How to resolve a dispute with a large company. If you're a typical consumer - defined as "a consumer whose mail consists mainly of offers for credit cards that he or she already has" - chances are sooner or later you're going to have a dispute with a large company. You're going to call the company, and you're going to wind up speaking with people in a department with a friendly name such as "Customer Service. " These people hate you. I don't mean they hate you personally.
NEWS
January 22, 1987 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this article were the Associated Press, United Press International and USA Today.)
Living legends B. B. King and Aretha Franklin joined Carl Perkins, Roy Orbison, Bo Diddley, Smokey Robinson and the Coasters for induction into the Rock and Roll of Fame last night at a $300-a-person, black-tie dinner at Manhattan's Waldorf Astoria hotel. Deceased rock pioneers Bill Haley and Rick Nelson were inducted, as were Clyde McPhatter, Jackie Wilson, Eddie Cochran, Muddy Waters, Marvin Gaye and Joe Turner. They're the second wave of entrants to the hall, created in 1985 and in the process of establishing a permanent home in Cleveland.
LIVING
October 24, 2008 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Sales this weekend will offer auctiongoers the chance to bid on outfits worn by Mia Farrow in one of her first films, a bronze statue of a hand holding a cigarette, a carved, hissing Canada goose, and a coffee table that looks like a topographical map. In other words, something for everyone. The clothing, designed by Pierre Cardin and worn by Farrow in 1968's A Dandy in Aspic, will be offered at the second session of Whitaker-Augusta Auction Co.'s sale, which will begin at 10 a.m. tomorrow at the Eagle Fire Company on Route 202 and Sugan Road in New Hope.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Goose! Goose!" The call goes out, and 19 people dutifully look skyward, tipping back in their sensible shoes for a view. "Ohh. . . . " "Ahh. . . . " Above, the glistening arrow of sculpted bird cuts across the April dawn sky, a lone emblem of power and of spring. Everyone contains their awe except Frank West, 67, who, for some reason, feels compelled to call greetings to the goose. "Biluip! Biluip!" he says (more or less). "Biluip!" Time out here for a question: Could a goose really mistake West - a sturdy, retired psychiatrist in a green parka - for a slender, feathered colleague?
NEWS
June 11, 1995 | By Stacia Friedman
Psychologists claim that people often encourage in others behaviors which they deny themselves. It naturally follows that this neurosis applies to good people who own bad dogs. The American Kennel Club would have you believe that there is no such thing as a bad dog, merely four-legged victims of neglect, abuse and generic Puppy Chow. Not so. I can't help thinking that the owners of delinquent canines harbor a desire to rummage through trash and pounce on their neighbors, and it is only through their pets that such taboo yearnings may be fulfilled.
NEWS
March 21, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
WHEN YOU went to Wayne Kroeger's house, in Warminster, you had to be careful not to step on the rabbits, to duck the stuffed goose hanging from the ceiling and not to freak out at the sight of the multitude of stuffed fauna in various poses throughout. It seemed as if nearly every species of feathered and four-legged creature was on display, each with its own habitat theme, like the raccoon with a trash can in its paw and its nose in a peanut-butter jar. And those rabbits. They were household pets, and if you visited during a holiday they would be dolled-up accordingly: Santa outfits for Christmas, Irish hats for St. Patrick's Day. You might not have believed that a rabbit would hold still for such shenanigans, but then you didn't know the black-and-white Dutches belonging to Wayne and his wife, Joan.
FOOD
January 5, 1992 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
A U.S. Olympic team recently held a practice session here in preparation for the 1992 competition. But instead of sneakers and sweat pants, the team came with pastry cloths, spatulas, ladles and butcher knives. The playing field was the kitchen at the Showboat Hotel & Casino. The meet brought together the 1992 Culinary Team USA Northeast, one of five teams picked to represent the United States in the World Culinary Olympics in Frankfurt, Germany, in October. Like its athletic counterpart, the Culinary Olympics pits the best of a worldwide field against one another in a quest for gold, silver and bronze medals.
NEWS
March 18, 2013
Selling out the brewery to Anheuser-Busch InBev is, in the eyes of craft beer drinkers, the equivalent of ditching Gryffindor for Voldemort and the Death Eaters. So it's no wonder Chicago's homegrown Goose Island has taken the beer-geek heat since its sale to the Bud Who Shall Not Be Named in 2011. The good news: since production of Goose Islands' mass-market brews (like 312 Urban Wheat) have been moved to Colorado and New York for a national rollout, there's more room at the original Chicago brewery for its more interesting efforts.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2010 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
Best known for its critically acclaimed licensed adaptations, with "Legendary Talespinners" Dynamite has simply borrowed the spirit of a beloved classic and tossed in some fresh ingredients to create something fresh, new and joyful. In many ways, the first issue reads like a contemporary version of "Miracle on 34th Street," sans Christmas theme. We are immediately introduced to ultra-serious Abby, a medical-school student who is a paragon of professionalism and punctuality, and determined to be the best intern at the free clinic where the majority of the story takes place.
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | By Nancy G. Heller FOR THE INQUIRER
Despite a few miscalculations in dramatic tone, Friday's opening-night performance of Christopher Wheeldon's Swan Lake was a visually stunning, emotionally wrenching and gorgeously danced way to inaugurate the Pennsylvania Ballet's 2005-06 season. Commissioned to celebrate the company's 40th anniversary, this Swan - set in a 19th-century Parisian ballet studio of the sort painted by Degas - is the company's largest and most expensive work, created by a sought-after choreographer.
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