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Goose

BUSINESS
June 18, 2011 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - It's starting to feel like a 1999 flashback. Internet companies - some of them profitable, some not - sense a golden opportunity and are lining up to go public this year. But we're nowhere close to the giddy days of the late '90s dot-com boom, when investors bought newly issued stocks as impulsively as lottery tickets. Technology stocks today are the cheapest in more than nine years, judging by one benchmark for appraising companies. In addition, venture capitalists who bankroll high-tech start-ups aren't pouring money into the Internet like they once did. Moreover, rapidly growing Internet companies LinkedIn Corp.
SPORTS
May 15, 2011
This goose didn't lay a golden egg, but it did cost the Drexel men's varsity eight a chance at a gold medal. The Dragons were in the lead in the men's varsity eight with about 500 meters to go on the 2,000-meter course Saturday in the Dad Vail when a goose got tangled in the oars on the starboard side. Their timing thrown off, their momentum broken, the Dragons couldn't recover and were passed by Michigan and Virginia. "We were going strong," said Tim Drake, a sophomore from Holy Spirit High who was in the No. 7 seat, which is on the port side.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | Inquirer Staff Report
A goose that was found with a blow dart through its neck last week on the Manayunk Canal has been successfully treated and will be released back to the wild today. Rick Schubert, director of the Schuylkill Center's Wildlife Rehabilitation Clinic (SWRC), said it took three days after the female goose was found April 13 before rescuers "gained its trust enough to pick it up. " "It was very skittish, obviously aware that it was injured and different from the others," he said.
NEWS
March 21, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
WHEN YOU went to Wayne Kroeger's house, in Warminster, you had to be careful not to step on the rabbits, to duck the stuffed goose hanging from the ceiling and not to freak out at the sight of the multitude of stuffed fauna in various poses throughout. It seemed as if nearly every species of feathered and four-legged creature was on display, each with its own habitat theme, like the raccoon with a trash can in its paw and its nose in a peanut-butter jar. And those rabbits. They were household pets, and if you visited during a holiday they would be dolled-up accordingly: Santa outfits for Christmas, Irish hats for St. Patrick's Day. You might not have believed that a rabbit would hold still for such shenanigans, but then you didn't know the black-and-white Dutches belonging to Wayne and his wife, Joan.
NEWS
January 13, 2011 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
THERE I WAS on Tuesday, poking around the American Bus Association's trade show at the Convention Center, when I spied a rack of materials promoting Philly's visitor attractions. Displayed amidst the brochures and pamphlets was a glossy, blue-and-green flyer. Its banner read, "Inter-Quacktive fun for Groups of all Ages!" I figured that the flyer belonged to Ride the Ducks, since anything in this city containing the word "quack" is often associated with the amphibious-tour company.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2010 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
Best known for its critically acclaimed licensed adaptations, with "Legendary Talespinners" Dynamite has simply borrowed the spirit of a beloved classic and tossed in some fresh ingredients to create something fresh, new and joyful. In many ways, the first issue reads like a contemporary version of "Miracle on 34th Street," sans Christmas theme. We are immediately introduced to ultra-serious Abby, a medical-school student who is a paragon of professionalism and punctuality, and determined to be the best intern at the free clinic where the majority of the story takes place.
NEWS
September 26, 2009 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine a future in which you can sit in the comfort of your reclining chair, virtually experiencing the world through an idealized pleasure-bot version of yourself. If only the makers of Surrogates had. Instead, they've crafted a superficial sci-fi film loaded with inconsistencies and cranium-scratchers. For instance, if the whole point of this surrogate society is to appear as a perfectly beautiful avatar, why would Bruce Willis choose that ludicrous blond wig that looks like he plucked it off a mannequin at Boscov's?
SPORTS
February 12, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
Goose Gossage, who is a special instructor at spring training for the New York Yankees, says Alex Rodriguez should never be allowed to join him in the Hall of Fame. "I've always liked A-Rod," Gossage told the Gazette, of Colorado Springs, Colo., yesterday. "But the things that are coming out now . . . " On Monday, Rodriguez confessed to taking steroids from 2001 to '03. Gossage appreciates Rodriguez' honesty. He wishes Barry Bonds and Mark McGwire and dozens of others would follow Rodriguez' example and confess their baseball sins.
NEWS
February 6, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Albert Marzano, 89, who designed the goose logo for the Wawa convenience-store chain, died of heart failure Sunday at his Philadelphia home. Mr. Marzano, who attended South Philadelphia High School, took classes in the 1930s at the Graphic Sketch Club and the Plastic Club, both in Philadelphia. But, his son Anton said, "he was largely self-taught. " During his Army service in World War II, Mr. Marzano illustrated military posters and signs, his son said. His work was so good that it "kept him out of combat.
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