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NEWS
July 25, 2000 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Workers from City Sign Services install a sign on South Broad Street to welcome the Republican National Convention to the city.
NEWS
September 5, 2008
ALASKA GOV. Sarah Palin should have no trouble being President if McCain can't fulfill his term. There are so many Republicans that could come to her aid with advice, and they have recent experience. For example, there's George W., Cheney, Rumsfeld, Scooter Libby, Karl Rove, to mention a few. So what's the problem? Mayer Krain Philadelphia
NEWS
August 28, 2012
A LOOK AT TUESDAY'S highlights from the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla. 2 p.m. * RNC Chairman Reince Priebus * Roll call of the states to nominate presidential and vice-presidential candidates. 7 p.m. * House Speaker John Boehner * Former Pennsylvania U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum 8 p.m. * Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker 9 p.m. * South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley 10 p.m. * Ann Romney * Keynote address from New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie Follow @CloutCon on Twitter for more.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | By Christopher Mumma, Special to The Inquirer
On Election Day, it seemed so easy. The Republican Party, out of power for 28 years in Winslow Township, swept to victory in three of four Township Committee races to forge a 6-3 advantage on the nine-member body. Euphoria was the GOP order of the day. But now, a bitter party battle threatens to engulf the Republicans as township officials prepare for tonight's annual reorganization, where the spoils of an election victory are doled out in jobs and appointments. The fight - which is over appointments but has its roots in a personal feud between Mayor Norman F. Tomasello and Committeeman James Powell - splits the Republican camp down the middle, leaving the newly formed Township Committee with an oddly fractured 3-3-3 arrangement.
NEWS
November 8, 2004
SO, IF Hollywood is all "pinko commie leftists," what does that make Bruce Willis, Bo Derek, Ray Romano, Patricia Heaton, Britney Spears, Gene Simmons, the late Johnny Ramone, et al? They're Republican. Many country artists are GOP. Even former actors turned governors - Reagan and Schwarzenegger were/are Republican. Don't think all entertainers are liberal. I have discussions with conservatives who don't resort to name-calling. The venomous tone just feeds into stereotypes that all Republicans are stodgy and incapable of accepting other points of view.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | Associated Press
TRENTON - Republicans in the New Jersey Assembly elected a new leader Tuesday. Assemblyman Jon Bramnick of Union County succeeds Alex DeCroce, who died of an apparent heart attack last week at the end of a long day of voting at the Statehouse. DeCroce had held the top spot since 2003. Bramnick, first elected to the Assembly in 2003, has served as the GOP conference leader since 2009, and was the minority whip before that. Assemblyman Dave Rible of Monmouth County was elevated to conference leader.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Daniel Cirucci
To paraphrase Mark Twain, the rumors of the death of the Republican Party are greatly exaggerated. Why? One need only look to the past, present, and future to find the answers: The past: The Republican Party is rightly tagged the Grand Old Party (GOP) because it is remarkably resilient. After Franklin D. Roosevelt scored a stunning reelection victory in 1936, the GOP was left with 17 senators and 89 House members. But the party bounced back. In 1946, it won control of the Senate, and in 1953, it seized control of the House.
NEWS
April 9, 2010
WHY DO Republicans continue to vote Republican? Over the last 80 years, they were against Social Security, Medicare and now health care for all. Any program that helps working people, they are against. If President Obama said he would continue tax breaks for the rich, the GOP would back him 100 percent. If the Republicans know this, why do they vote Republican? Over the years, when Republicans are asked why they voted against a bill that helps working people, their famous line is, "We voted against the bill because it does not do enough for the people.
NEWS
January 23, 1999 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
The Republican National Committee's selection of Philadelphia yesterday as host for the 2000 convention, said Jan Larimer, made everyone feel "all real good and warm and fuzzy inside. " Maybe it was the 6-foot-long cheesesteak that Mayor Rendell presented to the Republicans. Or maybe it was the $20 million line of credit guaranteeing the GOP will get what the city has promised in cold cash and services. Whatever caused that warm feeling, Larimer, who chaired the committee that recommended Philadelphia, called the city's $50 million package "unbelievable.
NEWS
January 8, 1989 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
By the tone of House Speaker Jim Wright's session-opening speech to his colleagues last week, one would expect the 101st Congress to be bathed in sweetness and light. "Working together" with Republicans was the basic theme of the House's top Democrat, who talked about the virtues of cooperation and bipartisanship in a murmur as thick as Texas molasses on a wintry morn. "The minority has an important and constructive role to play in the legislative process," Wright said, "and I am eager to encourage that role.
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NEWS
August 28, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
VOTERS ARE SIDING with Democratic Gov. Wolf over the Republican-controlled Legislature in the ongoing state budget standoff in Harrisburg, according to a new Daily News /Franklin & Marshall College poll released today. The poll, conducted between Aug. 17 and 23, found that 54 percent of voters hold the General Assembly responsible for the lack of a budget, while 29 percent hold Wolf responsible. The budget was due eight weeks ago. "People ask me,'Why is Wolf doing as well as he's doing?
NEWS
August 25, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Donald Trump may be dragging the Republican Party by the trunk into a strategic cul de sac. As he continues to defy polling gravity to lead the race for the GOP presidential nomination, Trump has forced some of his rivals to match his harsh language and policy proposals on illegal immigration. Republican strategists worry that the talk risks alienating Latino voters, the fastest-growing bloc in the electorate, thus making it harder to win the White House in 2016. Last week, a parade of Republican candidates seconded Trump's call to end automatic citizenship for the U.S.-born children of undocumented immigrants, a position once considered to be on the political fringe.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Two weeks' vacation on Cape Cod was a pleasant escape from the bizarre political circus otherwise known as the Republican primary contest, in which foreign policy has mostly gotten short shrift. But for someone who has been very critical of President Obama's foreign policy, there's scant solace in the positions of those candidates who are now giving foreign policy speeches. While Obama's policies pursued inflated hopes over realities, these Republicans ignore realities in favor of dated dreams.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Raising hopes for a budget deal, Republican legislative leaders emerged from negotiations Wednesday saying they would give Gov. Wolf a portion of the money he wants for public schools as long as he accepts their plan for pension reform. Though details were scant, Republicans who control both legislative chambers said they would agree to allocate an additional $400 million for classroom spending on kindergarten through 12th grade if the governor agreed to their counterproposal for reining in the ballooning cost of public-employee pensions.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | BY REP. DWIGHT EVANS
THERE'S THE STORY about the farmer who finds a boy in his pasture digging furiously into a huge pile of horse manure. "What in tarnation are you doing?" the farmer asks. "With all this manure I figure there's gotta be a pony under there somewhere," the boy answers. I wish I could find the pony under all the manure emanating from Republicans' "one-time offer" Wednesday on the state budget. Initial reports sounded promising: The GOP leadership in the House and Senate offered $300 million more in basic education funding in return for diverting future state workers and public school employees to 401(k)
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | By Jessica Parks and Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - During an hour-long negotiating session Wednesday, Gov. Wolf and Republican legislators inched toward compromise on some key sticking points in a budget six weeks overdue. House Speaker Mike Turzai (R., Allegheny) was careful to temper expectations, but said the talks marked the first time he had seen "some movement [by Wolf] acknowledging our perspective" on pension reform and privatization of the state liquor store system. "There's no breakthrough," Turzai said, "but it was an important discussion.
NEWS
August 13, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Gov. Wolf and Republican legislative leaders prepared to return to the budget negotiating table for the first time in a week, the governor on Tuesday stopped in Norristown on a mission. During a news conference, the first-term Democrat again touted his spending plan, and lobbed rhetorical grenades at Republicans, describing their budget proposal - which he vetoed six weeks ago - as an "insult," a "sham," and a "disgrace. " The spokeswoman for one Republican leader described that as "par for the course," and accused Wolf of unleashing "campaign-style rhetoric" whenever the sides start or end negotiations - a charge Wolf dismissed.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
There were plenty of attacks on Hillary Rodham Clinton and President Obama in Thursday's early GOP presidential debate, featuring the seven candidates who didn't qualify for the 9 p.m. prime-time event in Cleveland. But perhaps the more revealing moments in the hour-long event, referred to by some as the "happy hour" debate, came when second-tier candidates took shots at 2016 rivals who are performing better in the polls, such as Donald Trump and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush. Carly Fiorina, former chief executive of Hewlett-Packard, said Trump had tapped into Americans' frustration with "politics as usual.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
CLEVELAND - Celebrity businessman Donald Trump refused to rule out a third-party bid for president if he doesn't win the Republican nomination, upending the first televised debate of the party's primary season Thursday with blunt talk. "I cannot make the pledge at this time," Trump said in response to the first question, garnering boos from the ticketed audience of about 4,500. "I have to respect the person, if it's not me. " Besides, he said, "I'm leading by quite a bit. " Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul pounced.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
He made the cut, but seizing the spotlight during the first Republican presidential debate may be a challenge when Gov. Christie takes his place at the edge of the stage Thursday night in Cleveland. He'll be facing nine rivals, with limited time to make his case and with the risk that going on the attack will enhance negative perceptions of his combative style, political observers said. Christie's goal shouldn't be to make a splash, they advised. The New Jersey governor, said veterans of debates past, instead should focus on making a favorable impression on the millions of Americans expected to tune in to the 9 p.m. Fox News-Facebook debate.
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