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Gordon Gekko

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NEWS
September 23, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
You expect Oliver Stone to smash his big socialist hammer over the head of high finance in "Wall Street 2: Money Never Sleeps," but it's a blow that never lands. The movie is short on outrage, long on character, even longer on anticlimax - it's like heading out to a heavyweight prizefight and ending up at the avant-garde theater. Stone, who farmed out the writing to Allan Loeb and Stephen Schiff, is surprisingly soft on the subject of the recent mortgage-bubble meltdown. The movie ruminates thoughtfully on bubbles as an inevitable outgrowth of human nature, of nature itself, and is resigned to the idea that boom and bust cycles are part of life.
NEWS
May 10, 2009 | By Michael Smerconish
Forget Bernie Madoff. The Wall Street veteran who might be the real scapegoat for our country's financial meltdown hasn't closed a deal in more than two decades. Many presume he spent at least some of that time in jail. But his influence has stood the test of time. The prospect of duplicating his lifestyle and aura may have drawn many young brokers to Wall Street - for better or worse. And now he's coming back. Gordon Gekko. Sure, he's fictional. But now that 20th Century Fox has confirmed that Oliver Stone will direct a sequel to 1987's Wall Street and Michael Douglas will reprise his role as its most ruthless corporate raider, it's worth considering Gekko's impact.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1994 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
While Oliver Stone's Wall Street is not the inside dope on insider trading, it is a brazenly entertaining melodrama, festering with greed, bilious with revenge and positively reeking with the sour stench of success. As if we could fail to note the attributes of his principals, Stone christens his predatory characters Fox and Gekko, after the barnyard raider and the insect-devouring lizard. Charlie Sheen may disappoint as Bud Fox, but Michael Douglas (in his Oscar-winning role) is a standout as Gordon Gekko, a man described as having had "an ethical bypass at birth.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2010
IF YOU WANT an Angelina Jolie movie to make a pile of money, you have to put a gun in her hand. Better yet, a gun in each hand. This is the lesson exhibited by "Salt," an over-the-top action yarn featuring Jolie as a CIA agent with slo-mo ninja acrobatic skills and the ability to anticipate and counteract the most diabolical double-cross, if you don't count her agent's decision to book her in "The Tourist. " Also up: "Money Never Sleeps," Oliver Stone's lackluster follow-up to "Wall Street" featuring a watered-down Gordon Gekko, and Shia LaBeouf as the corruptible apprentice.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Michael Douglas is at his best when playing a character at his worst. Solitary Man is a wafer-thin film with a river-deep, mountain-high performance from Douglas. For its unpitying look at a pitiful man, it rivals the actor's turns in the underknown Wonder Boys and King of California . This time he is Ben Kalmen, disgraced New York businessman, who amuses himself and appalls everyone else by bedding women and girls with daddy issues. Some might describe this incorrigible lech, a sexagenarian in more ways than one, as Hugh Hefner with Gordon Gekko hair and a gecko's reptilian ethics.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
No, Oliver Stone's Wall Street is not the inside dope on insider trading. And it certainly does not do for the stock exchange what his Platoon did for Vietnam. But it is a brazenly entertaining melodrama, festering with greed, bilious with revenge and positively reeking with the sour stench of success. Yes, it wants to be The Sweet Smell of Success. But the only time Wall Street achieves such inspired nastiness is in Michael Douglas' reptilian performance as a corporate raider who owes more to Rasputin than to Ivan Boesky.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
OLIVER STONE had little interest in resurrecting Gordon Gekko, but the "Wall Street" character refused to stay in the crypt of the '80s. "Greed-is-Good" Gekko found vampire life as a perverse icon on Wall Street, and periodically financial rags would buttonhole Stone, asking Gekko's counterculture creator to explain his enduring appeal to the pinstripe class. Three years ago, Stone had this to say to Fortune magazine: "Gordon Gekko couldn't manipulate markets like he did back then.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
A new category should be added to this year's Academy Awards contest: Best Business Magazine In a Supporting Role. It was worth a great deal to Fortune and Forbes magazines to grab a featured role in the hit movie "Wall Street. " And representatives from both magazines acted in much the same way slimy corporate raider Gordon Gekko (Michael Douglas) operated. In return for free advertising in the magazines, "Wall Street" producers would include a mock copy of the magazine with Gekko on the cover.
NEWS
June 10, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
Well, it's official - nobody's better at playing narcissistic megalomaniac rich guys than Michael Douglas. For conformation, you don't have to wait for his Gordon Gekko reboot in September's "Wall Street" sequel. You get the full Michael right now in "Solitary Man," featuring Douglas as Ben, a disgraced businessman in the throes of colorful midlife(ish) self-destruction. When we meet him, he has junked a great marriage (to Susan Sarandon), has imploded a string of successful car dealerships and seems determined to sabotage things with his new girlfriend (Mary-Louise Parker)
NEWS
September 25, 2010
Music M.I.A. With Rye Rye. Maya Arulpragasam doesn't want to be a proper pop star. "It's like people want me to become some kind of Cinderella," says the rapper known as M.I.A., 35, who will be found headlining the Electric Factory on Sunday, with her protege Rye Rye opening the show. Talking on the phone this week from Montreal, where Arulpragasam was preparing for the start of a U.S. tour in support of her confrontational third album, Maya, she spoke about "the spirit of punk, of not lying down and accepting things.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE BUCKET-SHOP swindler whose story is told in "The Wolf of Wall Street" is now a "motivational" speaker, but he's got nothing on Martin Scorsese. Though conceived as a put-down of Wall Street excess, Scorsese's new movie is almost certain to recruit new blood to our ongoing bull-market bender. I'm not sure what the director had in mind, but his images send a definitive message: If you are possessed of ambition, drive and moral flexibility, you too can have Lamborghinis and yachts and snort cocaine from the bums of hookers (the first thing you see in the prologue, so don't say you weren't warned)
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Michael Smerconish
It was as if Oliver Stone had written a Mitt Romney sound bite when this week the candidate was quoted as saying, "I like firing people. " After all, Stone directed Michael Douglas, as Gordon Gekko, saying similar things in the 1987 movie classic Wall Street . Men in their 40s and 50s still quote Gekko: "Lunch is for wimps"; "I create nothing. I own"; "What's worth doing is worth doing for money"; "If you're not inside, you're outside"; and of course, "Greed, for lack of a better word, is good.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2010
IF YOU WANT an Angelina Jolie movie to make a pile of money, you have to put a gun in her hand. Better yet, a gun in each hand. This is the lesson exhibited by "Salt," an over-the-top action yarn featuring Jolie as a CIA agent with slo-mo ninja acrobatic skills and the ability to anticipate and counteract the most diabolical double-cross, if you don't count her agent's decision to book her in "The Tourist. " Also up: "Money Never Sleeps," Oliver Stone's lackluster follow-up to "Wall Street" featuring a watered-down Gordon Gekko, and Shia LaBeouf as the corruptible apprentice.
SPORTS
October 27, 2010 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
The most famous quote from Wall Street is delivered by Gordon Gekko. It's a line that's been recited countless times since Oliver Stone's malfunctioning morality tale was released in 1987. "The point is, ladies and gentlemen, that greed, for lack of a better word, is good," Gekko says. Days after the Phillies unexpectedly were bounced from the postseason, it's the rest of Gekko's monologue, the forgotten and overlooked parts, that makes the most sense: "Greed is right, greed works.
NEWS
September 25, 2010
Music M.I.A. With Rye Rye. Maya Arulpragasam doesn't want to be a proper pop star. "It's like people want me to become some kind of Cinderella," says the rapper known as M.I.A., 35, who will be found headlining the Electric Factory on Sunday, with her protege Rye Rye opening the show. Talking on the phone this week from Montreal, where Arulpragasam was preparing for the start of a U.S. tour in support of her confrontational third album, Maya, she spoke about "the spirit of punk, of not lying down and accepting things.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Oliver Stone's bookend to Wall Street , his brazenly entertaining 1987 melodrama that seemed to explain the stock market crash two months prior, Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps glistens and bursts like the 2008 banking bubble it chronicles. It boasts sharp performances from Michael Douglas reprising his role as slimy financier Gordon Gekko and Shia LaBeouf as stock analyst Jake Moore, engaged to Gekko's estranged daughter. The film whipsaws between hyperbolic character study and preachy account of the recent financial meltdown.
NEWS
September 23, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
You expect Oliver Stone to smash his big socialist hammer over the head of high finance in "Wall Street 2: Money Never Sleeps," but it's a blow that never lands. The movie is short on outrage, long on character, even longer on anticlimax - it's like heading out to a heavyweight prizefight and ending up at the avant-garde theater. Stone, who farmed out the writing to Allan Loeb and Stephen Schiff, is surprisingly soft on the subject of the recent mortgage-bubble meltdown. The movie ruminates thoughtfully on bubbles as an inevitable outgrowth of human nature, of nature itself, and is resigned to the idea that boom and bust cycles are part of life.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2010 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
Filmmaker Oliver Stone has amassed more controversial moments in his storied career than Gordon Gekko has cutthroat life lessons. Whether it is due to his foot-in-mouth tendencies around reporters or the often revisionist nature of his films, Stone seems to court the salacious and scandalous. Among them: His last theatrical release "South of the Border," a documentary about South America's lean toward the left, makes guys like Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez out to be all soft and cuddly.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
OLIVER STONE had little interest in resurrecting Gordon Gekko, but the "Wall Street" character refused to stay in the crypt of the '80s. "Greed-is-Good" Gekko found vampire life as a perverse icon on Wall Street, and periodically financial rags would buttonhole Stone, asking Gekko's counterculture creator to explain his enduring appeal to the pinstripe class. Three years ago, Stone had this to say to Fortune magazine: "Gordon Gekko couldn't manipulate markets like he did back then.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
Well, it's official - nobody's better at playing narcissistic megalomaniac rich guys than Michael Douglas. For conformation, you don't have to wait for his Gordon Gekko reboot in September's "Wall Street" sequel. You get the full Michael right now in "Solitary Man," featuring Douglas as Ben, a disgraced businessman in the throes of colorful midlife(ish) self-destruction. When we meet him, he has junked a great marriage (to Susan Sarandon), has imploded a string of successful car dealerships and seems determined to sabotage things with his new girlfriend (Mary-Louise Parker)
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