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Gorilla

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2015 | By Lauren McCutcheon, Daily News
The long: The latest addition to the Philadelphia Zoo's 3,000-foot overhead trail system - already used by tigers, lions, lemurs and orangutans - gives five resident gorillas space to step out of the Primate Reserve and onto netted platforms overhead. The short: It's a bird! It's a plane! It's a silverback! The deets: Twelve-foot-high platform, enclosed by "extremely strong" (according to Zoo COO Andy Baker), stainless-steel wire mesh, stretches 300 feet from the back of chez gorilla north to Bird Lake.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | By Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
When fictional California movie couples Bob and Carol and Ted and Alice needed to spice up their love lives, they attended a group therapy session advocating the joys of natural, spontaneous behavior. When trendy California primates Alvila and Memba sensed their relationship needed some zip, they flew in from the San Diego Zoo for a 24-month group therapy session with the Philadelphia Zoo's extended family of Western African lowland gorillas. "We're rooting for our Jessica to help them enhance their sex life.
NEWS
June 13, 2000
A possibly-broken-hearted 30-year-old single female is being forced to reproduce in a cage with a chest-thumping 16-year-old alpha male, while the whole world is watching - and we wonder why she's playing hard to get? Note to Demba: You go, gorilla.
NEWS
April 16, 2013 | Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - A gorilla at the Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium has given birth for the second time in as many years. Zoo officials said Monday they did not know the gender of the baby because they had not gotten close enough to Moka, the mother, to find out. Officials are keeping their distance while the baby bonds with Moka, zoo spokeswoman Tracy Gray said. Moka will likely carry the baby on her chest for three months. The same gorilla gave birth to a male last year, but that baby died after four months.
NEWS
December 1, 1999 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Chaka is in mourning. But Demba is there to comfort him. Chaka's ex, Rosie, a female gorilla at the Cincinnatti Zoo, gave birth Nov. 17 to a bouncing baby girl gorilla, Chaka's ninth offspring. But Sunday night, just hours after nursing from her mother, the baby died. Cincinnati Zoo officials announced the infant's death yesterday and said a necropsy had been done but results will not be available until tissue samples have been analyzed. In Philadelphia, zoo officials hope Demba, an "older gorilla" at 29, will make Chaka, 15, a father for the 10th time someday - and begin a new simian family to replace the primates killed in the disastrous Christmas Eve, 1995, zoo fire.
LIVING
July 31, 1995 | By Terry Kinney, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Katrina Miles contributed to this article
It's worked with humans, tigers, elands and bongos. Now officials at the Cincinnati Zoo are awaiting the birth of the world's first test-tube gorilla. The zoo's Center for Reproduction of Endangered Wildlife announced last week that it had successfully implanted an embryo fertilized outside the womb into a lowland gorilla. The baby gorilla is due in December. The announcement came 17 years to the day after the birth of the world's first test-tube human, Louise Brown. "A lot of times, research goes from animals to humans," said project director Betsy Dresser.
NEWS
January 18, 1990 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
It is whiz-kid hour at General High, Suburbs U.S.A. Six teenagers are zapping answers back at their teacher, demonstrating their knowledge of inductive reasoning, Platonic dualism and everything else they need to know to get ahead in life. The teacher asks them about their heritage; they can rattle off that information as well: Rudy, for instance, is 20 percent Irish, 80 percent German. Then it comes time for Buzz to tell his story, and it stops the interrogation dead in its tracks.
NEWS
September 23, 1993 | BY LINDA WRIGHT MOORE
Two items in the news last week suggest that where race matters are concerned, America still has plenty of work to do. If you're already moving on to the next page, stiffling a yawn, or feeling a visceral fury at me for use of the R-word, you are part of the problem. You should read on. You probably won't. The first item in the Wall Street Journal on Sept. 14 was headlined "Losing Ground. " It asserted that in the latest recession - which officially ended in March 1991 - only African-Americans suffered a net loss of jobs.
NEWS
August 11, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A gorilla that the Philadelphia Zoo was trying to mate with a newly arrived female died suddenly Friday, zoo officials said. Jabari, a 28-year-old western lowland gorilla, had shown signs of mouth or throat discomfort and apparently lost his appetite Thursday. That led to a full examination under anesthesia Friday, officials said. While anesthetized, Jabari stopped breathing and could not be resuscitated, officials said. "As soon as he fell asleep, we knew there was something dramatically wrong," said Keith Hinshaw, the zoo's senior veterinarian.
NEWS
June 1, 1999 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
When Chaka the gorilla left the Philadelphia Zoo five years ago for a new life in Cincinnati, Debra Bambrick-Pytlewski didn't fret. "I knew in my heart Chaka some day would return home to Philadelphia," said Bambrick-Pytlewski, who lives in Harrowgate Park. "I sensed the odds were good. " Well, the odds have always been with Bambrick-Pytlewski, who 15 years ago beat 10,000 other contestants to win a Daily News-Philadelphia Zoo contest to name Chaka. "Call him Chaka!" wrote Bambrick-Pytlewski, then 15. That's how the baby African lowland gorilla, the son of John and Samantha, got his name in July 1984.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 9, 2016
ISSUE | PHILADELPHIA ZOO A caring, nurturing home for gorillas The Philadelphia Zoo's gorillas, our closest-living relatives (with chimps and bonobos), cannot survive in their wild, natural habitat today ("Birth marred by a life in captivity," Monday). The zoo has moved from displaying individual animals in small, barren cages, to large, open, group-living spaces that provide fresh air and an abundance of natural and man-made materials to ensure their physical and mental well-being.
NEWS
September 6, 2016
ISSUE | PHILADELPHIA ZOO Birth marred by a life in captivity Rather than celebrate, I mourn for the western lowland gorilla that has just given birth to an adorable baby at the Philadelphia Zoo ("Visiting hours for baby gorilla," Thursday). How can anyone feel good when looking at this mother and child confined in a cage? Honi is unable to share its true heritage with this child. It has no opportunity to receive the embrace of its peers. If we wants to see lowland gorillas or any other wildlife, it should not be in a zoo. True, we all cannot afford safari vacations, but we can see wildlife on TV with clarity and realism.
NEWS
July 31, 2016
* SHARKNADO: THE 4TH AWAKENS. 9 p.m. Sunday, Syfy. Just when you thought it was safe to go back to your TV set, Ian Ziering and Tara Reid (pictured) return in the latest incarnation of the franchise that mixes sharks and storms, with predictably gory results. This one features the return of David Hasselhoff. * BOSTON EMS. 10 p.m. Saturday, 6ABC. From the producer of ABC News' NY Med and Boston Med, a second season of ride-alongs with Boston's first responders. * MTV CLASSIC, Monday.
NEWS
June 11, 2016
ISSUE | ZOOS Ways to learn about and conserve wildlife Harambe's death at the Cincinnati Zoo was very sad but certainly understandable. Concerning the Inquirer's editorial on the story ("Harambe reconsidered," June 3), which questioned the ethics of keeping primates and other large animals captive in urban centers, there are some thoughts that should be considered. I was a zookeeper at the Philadelphia Zoo for more than 24 years. I have observed and studied captive and wild animals, including gorillas, elephants, and killer whales (orcas)
NEWS
June 3, 2016
SOME YEARS AGO in another American zoo was an incident similar to the recent event in the Cincinnati zoo, where a small child fell into a gorilla pit. Everyone, of course, was horrified . . . that is, until one of the female gorillas picked up the fallen child and carried the toddler to the animals' caretaker. People who have cats and dogs know that animals, not unlike humans, have brains, emotions, and even get diseases similar to ours. Animals have also saved humans' lives.
NEWS
June 2, 2016
ABOUT 20 YEARS ago, when I was teaching French at a girls' high school in Malvern, I was picked to chaperone 40 of my students on a class trip to Paris. Having lived in Paris a decade earlier, I knew the city fairly well and was excited to get back to the sidewalk cafes, the museums, the Left Bank, and the sugar crepes that continued to fill my dreams, if not my stomach. Any apprehension I had about shepherding over three dozen hormone-filled teenagers across the ocean and through a city that gave the world Brigitte Bardot was outweighed by the prospect of free airfare and lodging.
NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
Honi, one of the Philadelphia Zoo's western lowland gorillas, is pregnant. The zoo announced Monday that the 21-year-old gorilla is expected to give birth in early fall. The baby will be the first gorilla born at the zoo in about 20 years, spokeswoman Dana Lombardo said. "Honi is doing great but, as with any pregnancy, we are carefully monitoring her health," Keith Hinshaw, the zoo's director of animal health, said in a statement. "Although this is early in the pregnancy, by using ultrasound imaging, we are able to see that the baby has a normal heartbeat, which is a very good sign.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2015 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fred Siegel says he decided to become a magician when he saw "a girl turn into a gorilla at Million Dollar Pier in Atlantic City when I was 8 years old. " That would do it for anybody. Siegel brings his show Fred's Magic World , a retro mix of prestidigitation, comedy, and - it says here - some "spooky parts" (maybe leave the littlest ones home), to Act II Playhouse. The show also stars mentalists the Rosen Sisters and Shakespearean escapologist Eric Van Wie, who plays everybody else necessary.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2015 | By Lauren McCutcheon, Daily News
The long: The latest addition to the Philadelphia Zoo's 3,000-foot overhead trail system - already used by tigers, lions, lemurs and orangutans - gives five resident gorillas space to step out of the Primate Reserve and onto netted platforms overhead. The short: It's a bird! It's a plane! It's a silverback! The deets: Twelve-foot-high platform, enclosed by "extremely strong" (according to Zoo COO Andy Baker), stainless-steel wire mesh, stretches 300 feet from the back of chez gorilla north to Bird Lake.
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