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ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1995 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When gospel composer Carol Antrom wondered how her songs were being received several years ago, she resorted to a little marketing. She handed out a pack of three-by-five index cards during her much-anticipated annual concert of songs here. Many cards came back ringing with testimonials. One man wrote that he had come to the concert filled with thoughts of suicide. But the music had magically dispelled them. It had given him hope, if only for a time. Antrom's songs - many are rich ballads taken from her personal experiences - have been banishing negativities for years.
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | By Anjetta McQueen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Producers, promoters and playwrights are seeing a rising interest in bringing the gospel and its music to the stage, and this blend of church and theater is dealing with some worldly subjects indeed - drug-pushing, adultery, prostitution, deceit and death. "Today's problems in society are appealing to the public," said Samuel L'hommedieu, a Virginia-based gospel show promoter. "The music is enjoyed and the themes are of interest to people today. " Resolutions, a gospel musical by Virginia playwright Dorothy Hughes, opens tonight at the Shubert Theater and ends Sunday.
NEWS
January 5, 1994 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
Gospel lovers and those who'd like to know more about a musical tradition whose roots grow deep in Philadelphia will want to keep Friday nights free for a while. Starting this week, National Public Radio and the Smithsonian Institution will present a 26-part exploration of African-American sacred music and its influence on American life. It will air locally on WHYY. "Wade in the Water: African- American Sacred Music Traditions" will use music, storytelling and analysis to recount the history of African-Americans in this country.
NEWS
September 19, 1986 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sing glory hallelujah! The Kentucky Fried Chicken Corp. has announced the eight finalists in its second annual Philadelphia-area gospel music competition. The finalists - two in each category - will meet Oct. 12 in a concert-style competition at the Academy of Music, where judges will name a winner in each of the four categories. More than 100 soloists, ensembles and choirs had entered the first round of competition during the summer, and this month 57 semifinalists competed in concerts at four area churches.
NEWS
June 29, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Somewhere in the first act of Don't Get God Started, I thought of The Gospel at Colonus and the difference between the two. Both are gospel musicals. The first is a real one. The second is a fake. The difference is mostly in an understanding of what makes a good gospel musical. Don't Get God Started, which has moved into the Walnut Street Theater for what should be a long summer's run, maintains close contact with its roots - the black Pentecostal church service. With music and lyrics by Marvin Winans and a book by Ron Milner, this new work never strays from the simple basic mission of redemptive Christian faith.
NEWS
August 13, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The pedal steel guitarist Robert Randolph began the gospel standard "Call Him by His Name" Friday at the Theatre of Living Arts all alone. He dropped several fierce single notes, ripping out each as though tearing pages from a magazine. He didn't do anything particularly tricky; instead, he let the pure, soul-piercing sound of his instrument command the spotlight. Pretty soon conversation stopped. The room, filled to sweaty capacity, grew as quiet as a chapel. Then Randolph got busy.
NEWS
July 13, 1988 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Don't Get God Started adds something new and important to the standard elements of the gospel musical. In addition to the lead vocalists, the choir and the roof-raising fervor, this gospel musical draws upon the comedy and the drama of life as its audience recognizes life is lived. Sketches are acted out between gospel numbers, bringing this show closer than the theater usually gets to the spirit of the Middle Ages, when religious faith and entertainment were intermingled for a community of believers.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just when it seemed that gospel plays had pulled themselves out of the predictable confinement of being "good gospel, bad play," along comes No Place to Lay My Head. Recent productions like The First Lady knew they could count on big voices and powerful songs alone to drawn their audience, but they didn't settle for that. Instead they delivered real plots, believable characters and quality acting between the music. No Place to Lay My Head falls back into the "good enough" attitude of too many early gospel plays.
NEWS
November 21, 1995 | By Andrea Hamilton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Archibishop Wood High School will present a Thanksgiving weekend performance of The Word, a gospel rock opera by Bill Monaghan of Bucks County. The show, being produced for the third year, will be at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday in the school's Friedman Auditorium at 655 York Rd., Warminster. Tickets are $5 for adults, $3 for students and older adults. For information and ticket reservations, call 215-672-5050, Ext. 17. THANKSGIVING SERVICES Woodside Presbyterian Church, at 1667 Edgewood Rd., Lower Makefield, will hold an ecumenical service at 7:30 p.m. today.
NEWS
November 15, 1991 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Watch it, suckers, Aunt Esther is coming to Philly. LaWanda Page, best-known for her role as Redd Foxx's Bible-toting nemesis on the long-running television show Sanford and Son, will be appearing at the Shubert Theater tomorrow and Sunday. She is the star of Take It to the Lord . . . or Else!, a gospel musical comedy written, directed and produced by Philadelphia playwright Don B. Welch. The two of them were in a New York Hilton & Towers hotel room preparing for an appearance last week on Sally Jessy Raphael's talkfest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
THIS MEAL'S not happy, it's praiseworthy. Wednesday, the 2016 McDonald's Inspiration Celebration Gospel Tour comes to the Dell Music Center (2400 Strawberry Mansion Drive). Tickets are free (at www.365Black.com , while supplies last) and concertgoers can enjoy uplifting music and help a good cause, Ronald McDonald House Charities. Now in its 10th year, this edition will be hosted by Stellar-nominated artist and radio personality Lonnie Hunter and feature performances and inspiration from Donald Lawrence , Bishop Marvin Sapp , Karen Clark-Sheard , Pastor Charles Jenkins , Christian rapper Canton Jones , Gospel crooner Jonathan McReynolds , Williams Brothers member Doug Williams and Christian comedienne, Small Fire . There also will be a presentation to the 2016 Anthony DeLuz Black History Maker of Today, educator Omar Barlow . Doors open at 6 p.m. The show begins an hour later.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2016 | By Allison Stewart, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE
CHANCE THE Rapper's most significant new song doesn't even appear on his acclaimed new mixtape, Coloring Book . On the jazzy, gospel-influenced outtake "Grown A- Kid," left off the project due to difficulties with sample clearance, the Chicago emcee affirms what he'd been hinting at for years: "Everybody can finally say it out loud / My favorite rapper a Christian rapper. " It may not have seemed like a big deal, but there it was, out in the open, possibly the most overt declaration of Christian faith from a secular rapper since Kanye West's seismic single "Jesus Walks.
NEWS
May 26, 2016
By Ed Stetzer 'Preach the gospel at all times; if necessary, use words," St. Francis of Assisi is supposed to have said. The aphorism, often quoted, expresses a well-meaning viewpoint of many Christians today. They are concerned that we've been too loud, demanding, and angry. Now, they say, we need to show the gospel by our lives. It's a good sentiment, and I certainly agree that we need to demonstrate the gospel change in our lives by caring for others. But there are two problems with the Assisi quote.
NEWS
May 8, 2016
Zero K By Don DeLillo Scribner. 288 pp. $28 Reviewed by John Domini Don DeLillo began his crescendo of celebrated work - one cymbal crash after another through the 1980s and '90s - with a novel that may be his quietest. The Names , from 1982, doesn't investigate a president's assassination, like Libra (1988) does; rather, it details a family breakup, reducing a tragedy to mute, scattered fragments - suited perfectly to the primary setting, an archaeological dig. So when I say the new Zero K recalls that '82 work, it's high praise.
NEWS
March 22, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For the Daily News
If modern gospel music's male division had but one figurehead, it would be a tough battle to see who would top that mountain. Certainly, there are young Winans to contend with, along with Fred Hammond, Marvin Sapp, Donnie McClurki, New Jersey's own Tye Tribbett. If, though, the peak were reserved for those whose albums had charted into pop, soul, and hip-hop territory along with topping the sacred charts, there is but one clear leader: Kirk Franklin. Genre-stretching aside, the 46-year-old Fort Worth, Texas, native said that with his newest tour, coming to the Tower Theater on Wednesday, "You've never seen anything like this from me before, I promise.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
The Texas-born gospel artist's arrangement of "Ultra Light Beam" on Kanye West's The Life of Pablo has been called "the most powerful thing I've heard in my earthly existence" by - who else? - Kanye West. Wednesday at the Tower Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
The first influence that Christian McBride mentioned at the Merriam Theater on Saturday night was not one of the four civil-rights icons paid homage in his epic suite The Movement Revisited . Appropriately for a hometown performance, the bassist/composer instead began the evening by talking about his grandmother, whose hoard of Ebony and Jet magazine back issues provided his earliest introduction to African American history. He made fun of her pack-rat tendencies back then, McBride concluded, but now has her to thank for planting the seeds of his most ambitious work as a composer to date.
NEWS
November 24, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
The man known as Philly Jesus has launched an Internet fund-raising campaign seeking to raise $70 million to expand, perhaps even make global, his LOVE Park-centered street ministry. Mike Grant, as Philly Jesus is otherwise known, wrote on his GoFundMe page, launched Nov. 9, that he needed the millions to further his ministry. To do that, he highlighted many anticipated expenses, including: "A building/stadium for the Philly Jesus Ministry. " "A helicopter/jet for the Philly Jesus Ministry to transport the ministry from and to future speaking engagements across the WORLD to share my testimony how JESUS saved me from the dark hole of addiction and despair . . . and to spread The Gospel of Jesus Christ to every creature in existence.
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Ten years ago, Young Jeezy, hip-hop's self-proclaimed "snowman," released his debut album, Let's Get It: Thug Motivation 101 , a record filled with the allure of drugs and the sale of anything that wasn't nailed to the floor. As Young Jeezy, he kept to this single shtick for nine years, until he wasn't all that young any longer. By 2014, the un-young Jeezy was less restless (or sales-oriented) and more ruminative, hence the thoughtful soliloquies of the album Seen It All . Fronting his new album, Church in These Streets , and preaching the gospel of empowerment, Jeezy hit Union Transfer on Wednesday to speak his own sermon on the mount.
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
By instilling a love of reading in her students, Chelsea Collins has become "the embodiment of what a teacher should be," according to one of her supervisors at the Woodstown Middle School in Salem County, where she has taught language arts for four years. And that quality may be what earned the sixth-grade teacher the distinction of being named the 2015-16 State Teacher of the Year. Her school is in the Woodstown-Pilesgrove School District. Collins, who lives in Elmer, and four finalists from throughout the state were honored Wednesday in Trenton at a ceremony with New Jersey Education Commissioner David Hespe.
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