CollectionsGossamer
IN THE NEWS

Gossamer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 29, 2010 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
People's Light & Theatre doesn't shy away from presenting challenging work for children. In 2007, the company produced The Giver, an adaptation of Lois Lowry's Newbery Award-winning sci-fi novel about a futuristic village in which things are not quite as utopian as they appear. This weekend, People's Light opens its production of Gossamer, the first of her novels that Lowry herself has chosen to adapt for the stage. She will be at the theater in Malvern for talk-backs and book signings after Friday's performance and Saturday's matinee.
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Italian spring collections are overflowing with demure white blouses, which are a big part of the soft, languid look that is all the rage here. The tender colors and gossamer linens and crepes that dominate the collections of Krizia, Fendi and Laura Biagiotti are a striking contrast to Milan's traditional sleek, man-tailored look. Unlike former seasons, when the Italian ideal was a strong-shouldered sophisticate who marched through her days in spike heels and short, snug skirts, the new spring woman is an ingenue with a predilection for flat shoes; long, softly gathered skirts, and billowy white blouses rippling with pleats and tucks.
NEWS
May 5, 2010 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Though you may not be familiar with Lois Lowry, author of Gossamer, to children and the many teachers who employ her work in their classrooms, she's a two-time Newbery Award-winning literary goddess. Writer of more than 30 books, many of which tackle difficult subjects without condescending or relying on happy endings, Lowry dredges deep beneath the surface of kids' lives, tapping into their very real, and justified, anxieties. Gossamer, now playing at Malvern's People's Light & Theater Company, is no exception: John (Daniel Dychala)
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Passion Pit, the electro-pop band whose hit single "Take a Walk" is familiar to all who've been exposed to TV and radio commercials for Taco Bell's Doritos Locos tacos, headlines the Electric Factory Thursday. This Philadelphia date for the band fronted by Michael Angelakos, which played the Made in America festival in September, is part of a world tour in support of the group's emotionally fraught, seriously catchy sophomore album, Gossamer , that is scheduled to continue into next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2008 | By Leonard Boasberg FOR THE INQUIRER
There aren't many light verse practitioners left in America. Like typewriter repairmen and polka-playing TV hosts, they are hard to find. - New York Times, Dec. 17 Oh, woe, alas, and a dose of alack, Light verse is having a heart attack. What happened to rhyme, what happened to rhymesters? They're not worth a dime, not even in dimestores. Times may be trouble but times could be worse, Could that be a reason for not making verse?
NEWS
June 2, 2008 | By ANN ROSEN SPECTOR
HELLO, young lovers, wherever you are . . . getting ready to walk down the wedding aisle. Engagement party. Check. Bridal shower. Check. Bachelor party weekend. Check. Bachelorette party weekend. Check. Destination wedding so the party goes on for at least three or four days. Check. Photos and videos. Check. Matching table linens, party favors, exquisite floral arrangements (so what if the blooms have to be flown in from Tahiti? The colors must be PERFECT)
NEWS
November 11, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
John Pace Seavering is a publisher whose future life is an open book. But something strange and ominous has happened: The pages recounting the years he has yet to live have already been printed, and he can read them. The path Richard Greenberg takes to set up Seavering's predicament and ponder the role of time in our lives in The Violet Hour involves ingenuity and no small measure of contrivance. As a result, the production, the first offering at the splendidly refurbished Biltmore Theatre, is by turns intriguing, moving and exasperating.
FOOD
May 30, 1993 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Seven years after caterers Bill and Nancy Hoffman struck gold with Carolina's, an affordable yet chic restaurant in an upscale Center City neighborhood, the Hoffmans appear to have found another rich vein to mine. A second Carolina's, this one as pastel-pretty as a Newport beach house, opened in late April on a Radnor lane that's as near to elegant Main Line estates as the original Carolina's is to the fine townhomes, condos and apartments of Rittenhouse Square. The new location appears as instantly successful as the first.
NEWS
January 27, 1997 | By Claude Lewis
You're Dennis Rodman and you play basketball in the NBA for a living. You're one-fifth of one of the strongest starting lineups in basketball history. At 35, your value stems as much from your youthful personality as from your ability to snag rebounds off the boards. Fans laugh at you and shake their heads in disbelief as you engage in muscular battles with your NBA opponents. While your teammates play to win, you conduct private contests in public view. Despite your multicolored hair and brazen off-the-court interviews, many agree that your distracting presence improves the Chicago Bulls basketball team.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
It was a chance remark overheard amid the babble of a Hollywood party, but the recollection of it summoned The Look from Kathleen Turner. The Look makes the lasers in Star Wars seem like dime-store flashlights. The Look induced a state of sexual meltdown in William Hurt in Body Heat, reduced Jack Nicholson's hit man in Prizzi's Honor to aroused befuddlement and put Nicolas Cage in his place in Peggy Sue Got Married. The Look conveys the smoldering sexuality that led many critics to compare her to "a young Lauren Bacall" early in her career.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Passion Pit, the electro-pop band whose hit single "Take a Walk" is familiar to all who've been exposed to TV and radio commercials for Taco Bell's Doritos Locos tacos, headlines the Electric Factory Thursday. This Philadelphia date for the band fronted by Michael Angelakos, which played the Made in America festival in September, is part of a world tour in support of the group's emotionally fraught, seriously catchy sophomore album, Gossamer , that is scheduled to continue into next year.
NEWS
May 5, 2010 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Though you may not be familiar with Lois Lowry, author of Gossamer, to children and the many teachers who employ her work in their classrooms, she's a two-time Newbery Award-winning literary goddess. Writer of more than 30 books, many of which tackle difficult subjects without condescending or relying on happy endings, Lowry dredges deep beneath the surface of kids' lives, tapping into their very real, and justified, anxieties. Gossamer, now playing at Malvern's People's Light & Theater Company, is no exception: John (Daniel Dychala)
NEWS
April 29, 2010 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
People's Light & Theatre doesn't shy away from presenting challenging work for children. In 2007, the company produced The Giver, an adaptation of Lois Lowry's Newbery Award-winning sci-fi novel about a futuristic village in which things are not quite as utopian as they appear. This weekend, People's Light opens its production of Gossamer, the first of her novels that Lowry herself has chosen to adapt for the stage. She will be at the theater in Malvern for talk-backs and book signings after Friday's performance and Saturday's matinee.
NEWS
February 11, 2010 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a fairy-tale day, hushed and ethereal, Chestnut Hill played the snow queen of the city. Elegant and self-possessed, the enclave, in the northwest corner of Philadelphia, rarely appears in public looking anything less than lovely. But yesterday, she was exquisite beyond words. Trees curtsied deeply in her royal presence. Her knights rode plows to clear paths through her domain. And Josiah Albrecht repaired one of her forts. Josiah, 6, and his sister, Evangeline, 2, had worked hard earlier in the week to build the defensive post outside their house.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2008 | By Leonard Boasberg FOR THE INQUIRER
There aren't many light verse practitioners left in America. Like typewriter repairmen and polka-playing TV hosts, they are hard to find. - New York Times, Dec. 17 Oh, woe, alas, and a dose of alack, Light verse is having a heart attack. What happened to rhyme, what happened to rhymesters? They're not worth a dime, not even in dimestores. Times may be trouble but times could be worse, Could that be a reason for not making verse?
NEWS
June 2, 2008 | By ANN ROSEN SPECTOR
HELLO, young lovers, wherever you are . . . getting ready to walk down the wedding aisle. Engagement party. Check. Bridal shower. Check. Bachelor party weekend. Check. Bachelorette party weekend. Check. Destination wedding so the party goes on for at least three or four days. Check. Photos and videos. Check. Matching table linens, party favors, exquisite floral arrangements (so what if the blooms have to be flown in from Tahiti? The colors must be PERFECT)
NEWS
October 14, 2007 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Angels and devils have peopled the spirit world of some major religions for eons, roaming between the Almighty and mere mortals. But fairies and goblins, gnomes and pixies have roamed an alternative universe, imagined perhaps to explain all that went bump in the night. Yesterday, folks wearing butterfly wings on their backs and pointy ears and painted faces were wandering Faerie Con: The International Faerie Convention, in Philadelphia. A bit of Tolkien's Lord of the Rings.
NEWS
November 11, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
John Pace Seavering is a publisher whose future life is an open book. But something strange and ominous has happened: The pages recounting the years he has yet to live have already been printed, and he can read them. The path Richard Greenberg takes to set up Seavering's predicament and ponder the role of time in our lives in The Violet Hour involves ingenuity and no small measure of contrivance. As a result, the production, the first offering at the splendidly refurbished Biltmore Theatre, is by turns intriguing, moving and exasperating.
NEWS
October 12, 1997 | By Anthony Beckman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Nose to tail, the three purple and white kites gracefully carved through the sky in a quick and perfect aerial ballet, twisting and circling effortlessly as the kite lines crossed, tangled, and found their way straight again. In the sky, it's elegant and simple. On the ground, it's choreographed mayhem. Holding two control lines for each kite, the three fliers split, dashed forward, back and sideways, shouting commands to keep the kites' dance seamless and fluid. It's the pinnacle of sport kiting.
NEWS
January 27, 1997 | By Claude Lewis
You're Dennis Rodman and you play basketball in the NBA for a living. You're one-fifth of one of the strongest starting lineups in basketball history. At 35, your value stems as much from your youthful personality as from your ability to snag rebounds off the boards. Fans laugh at you and shake their heads in disbelief as you engage in muscular battles with your NBA opponents. While your teammates play to win, you conduct private contests in public view. Despite your multicolored hair and brazen off-the-court interviews, many agree that your distracting presence improves the Chicago Bulls basketball team.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|