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Gouda

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NEWS
June 27, 1993 | By Ralph and Terry Kovel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Gouda art pottery is the name given by collectors to art-nouveau and art- deco pottery made in various shops near Gouda, Arnhem and other towns in the Netherlands and Belgium. The distinctive designs and colors used by potters in the area attracted buyers from all parts of the world. The pieces are usually marked with factory names: Zuid Holland, Goedewaagen, Schoonhoven, Regina or Platteelbakkery. "Zuid" also means south, and it refers to the province where the town of Gouda is located.
FOOD
September 22, 2011
Considering Wisconsin's heritage as an industrial cheese center, its arrival as a major player in the craft cheese movement was a long time in coming. It has made up ground quickly, with hits such as Pleasant Ridge's Reserve and Marieke gouda. The latest Wisconsin star is Evalon from LaClare Farms and its young cheesemaker, Katie Hedrich. As a firm, aged wheel, it's a real rarity in American goat cheese. LaClare describes it as a gouda style, but I agree with Emiglio Mignucci of DiBruno Bros.
FOOD
October 8, 2009
The early fall is gouda time in my kitchen. There's something about the fresh chill that demands a firmer, richer cheese, and few deliver complexity and concentrated creaminess quite like Dutch gouda. You can taste a wide selection at Salumeria in the Reading Terminal Market, which often has a half-dozen varieties. The "classic" from Beemster is still young enough to retain a creamy chew, but with at least 18 months of age, this cow's milk cheese (from herds grazed on sub-sea-level Netherlands grass)
NEWS
June 3, 1986 | By Robin Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
At least 40 houses in Logan - 11 more than were reported in the city's last count - are in dangerous condition because they were built on unstable ash- and-cinder fill more than 60 years ago, according to engineers' findings made public yesterday. And although Mayor Goode said yesterday that affected homeowners may be eligible for state and federal aid, engineers offered little hope of a simple solution for the slowly sinking neighborhood. "At this time, unfortunately, I don't have a solution for this problem.
NEWS
January 7, 1988 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Common Pleas Court Judge Samuel M. Lehrer imposed fines totaling $105,000 yesterday on Ramex International Inc., builder of the Regency Hill development in the Somerton section of Northeast Philadelphia, for failing to correct dozens of building-code violations in nine houses. In addition, a consultant hired by the city said about 40 percent of the development was built on fill dirt and that a steep, eroding, 22-foot hill made up of fill dirt needs to be stabilized as soon as possible.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
For more than two years, dirt from a hill near Bernita Drive has been falling into the back yards of several properties in the Regency Hill development. But the cascade of soil and mud soon will come to an end. A 190-foot-long retaining wall that should keep the back yards dirt free is scheduled to be completed by the end of the month. "The retaining wall will prevent the slope from sliding and will preserve the size of the back yards," said Moustafa A. Gouda, of Lippincott Engineering Associates.
NEWS
December 10, 1986 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
City officials, engineers and architects appeared for a public hearing before a City Council committee yesterday to discuss the problems faced by owners of sinking homes in the city's Logan section and to seek ways of helping them. Moustafa A. Gouda, a geotechnical engineer with Lippincott Engineering Associates of Delanco, N.J., estimated during the hearing in Council chambers that any of the houses worth saving would require about $30,000 in structural work. He said saving the houses meant underpinning their foundations, replacing lateral pipes connected to city sewer lines, and installing house gutters and downspouts.
FOOD
March 9, 1988 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Chicken cutlets are quick-cooking calorie-savers for busy waistline watchers. Versatility is a great part of their appeal. Turning the flat cutlets into rollettes with savory cheese fillings provides them with glamour that belies their ease. Cheese? Isn't cheese fattening? Yes, but the chicken itself is so low in fat and calories that you can afford to dress it up with a small amount of cheese. The trick is to use the most flavorful cheese you can find - Gouda, for example. Both Gouda and Edam are Dutch cheeses, about 1,617 calories per pound.
FOOD
February 19, 2004 | By Bev Bennett FOR THE INQUIRER
Savory, bite-size cheese crackers are one of my favorite snack foods. I'm not a snob. The bright orange color, crisp texture, and salty, sharp flavor of the classic processed-cheese crackers are irresistible. One handful is never enough. But I'm also pleased that I can make a pretty tasty version at home. Though the flavor and texture vary with the recipe, I've never made a cheese cracker that wasn't delicious. Three factors determine the outcome: the amount of fat in the recipe, the thickness of the dough, and the type of cheese.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
December 27, 2012
You think you know gouda? You probably don't know what gouda can be unless you've tasted Wilde Weide, a "farmhouse" cheese handmade by Jan and Roos van Schie on their little island in South Holland in the Netherlands. Unlike even the best mass-produced goudas, which can become waxy and butterscotchy with age, there is a remarkably subtle complexity to Wilde Weide, but also a fresh brightness evident from the organic raw milk of Montbeliarde and red Friesian cows. This two-year-old firm cheese melts in slo-mo on the tongue, its texture crumbling like a fine sand of flavor crystals, turning to creaminess that evokes nuts and oaked whiskey, then an herbal brightness that pays homage to the name: wilde weide is Dutch for "wild meadow.
FOOD
September 22, 2011
Considering Wisconsin's heritage as an industrial cheese center, its arrival as a major player in the craft cheese movement was a long time in coming. It has made up ground quickly, with hits such as Pleasant Ridge's Reserve and Marieke gouda. The latest Wisconsin star is Evalon from LaClare Farms and its young cheesemaker, Katie Hedrich. As a firm, aged wheel, it's a real rarity in American goat cheese. LaClare describes it as a gouda style, but I agree with Emiglio Mignucci of DiBruno Bros.
FOOD
October 8, 2009
The early fall is gouda time in my kitchen. There's something about the fresh chill that demands a firmer, richer cheese, and few deliver complexity and concentrated creaminess quite like Dutch gouda. You can taste a wide selection at Salumeria in the Reading Terminal Market, which often has a half-dozen varieties. The "classic" from Beemster is still young enough to retain a creamy chew, but with at least 18 months of age, this cow's milk cheese (from herds grazed on sub-sea-level Netherlands grass)
FOOD
February 19, 2004 | By Bev Bennett FOR THE INQUIRER
Savory, bite-size cheese crackers are one of my favorite snack foods. I'm not a snob. The bright orange color, crisp texture, and salty, sharp flavor of the classic processed-cheese crackers are irresistible. One handful is never enough. But I'm also pleased that I can make a pretty tasty version at home. Though the flavor and texture vary with the recipe, I've never made a cheese cracker that wasn't delicious. Three factors determine the outcome: the amount of fat in the recipe, the thickness of the dough, and the type of cheese.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | By Ralph and Terry Kovel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Gouda art pottery is the name given by collectors to art-nouveau and art- deco pottery made in various shops near Gouda, Arnhem and other towns in the Netherlands and Belgium. The distinctive designs and colors used by potters in the area attracted buyers from all parts of the world. The pieces are usually marked with factory names: Zuid Holland, Goedewaagen, Schoonhoven, Regina or Platteelbakkery. "Zuid" also means south, and it refers to the province where the town of Gouda is located.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
For more than two years, dirt from a hill near Bernita Drive has been falling into the back yards of several properties in the Regency Hill development. But the cascade of soil and mud soon will come to an end. A 190-foot-long retaining wall that should keep the back yards dirt free is scheduled to be completed by the end of the month. "The retaining wall will prevent the slope from sliding and will preserve the size of the back yards," said Moustafa A. Gouda, of Lippincott Engineering Associates.
FOOD
March 9, 1988 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Chicken cutlets are quick-cooking calorie-savers for busy waistline watchers. Versatility is a great part of their appeal. Turning the flat cutlets into rollettes with savory cheese fillings provides them with glamour that belies their ease. Cheese? Isn't cheese fattening? Yes, but the chicken itself is so low in fat and calories that you can afford to dress it up with a small amount of cheese. The trick is to use the most flavorful cheese you can find - Gouda, for example. Both Gouda and Edam are Dutch cheeses, about 1,617 calories per pound.
NEWS
January 7, 1988 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Common Pleas Court Judge Samuel M. Lehrer imposed fines totaling $105,000 yesterday on Ramex International Inc., builder of the Regency Hill development in the Somerton section of Northeast Philadelphia, for failing to correct dozens of building-code violations in nine houses. In addition, a consultant hired by the city said about 40 percent of the development was built on fill dirt and that a steep, eroding, 22-foot hill made up of fill dirt needs to be stabilized as soon as possible.
NEWS
December 10, 1986 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
City officials, engineers and architects appeared for a public hearing before a City Council committee yesterday to discuss the problems faced by owners of sinking homes in the city's Logan section and to seek ways of helping them. Moustafa A. Gouda, a geotechnical engineer with Lippincott Engineering Associates of Delanco, N.J., estimated during the hearing in Council chambers that any of the houses worth saving would require about $30,000 in structural work. He said saving the houses meant underpinning their foundations, replacing lateral pipes connected to city sewer lines, and installing house gutters and downspouts.
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