FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
September 20, 2000 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
David Wells was pushed back in Toronto's rotation because he has gout in his right big toe. He was rescheduled to pitch against the New York Yankees tomorrow. Steve Trachsel, 7-13 with a 4.74 earned run average this season, took Wells' place for last night's series opener, pitching against Andy Pettitte (18-7). Gout is the result of a buildup of uric acid in the blood. It is hereditary, but it also can be caused by eating rich foods and drinking alcohol. Wells refused to talk to reporters.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: My husband suffers from gout. His doctor has told him to avoid alcohol but is also having tests done on his liver. What is the connection and can he modify his diet to avoid future episodes of gout? A: Gout may be worsened by alcohol. Although an across-the-board prohibition is unnecessary for most patients, some imbibers (especially heavy drinkers) are helped by giving up booze. He should also avoid organ meats - such as liver and kidneys - which can worsen gout. Alcohol received bad press because, many years ago, lead products were used commercially to clarify wines.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2012 | Michael Armstrong
Some think this is the classic Philadelphia story: Club boxer gets his shot at the heavyweight title and shocks the world. To me, the classic Philadelphia story is: Businessman starts a company. Son takes over and sends it to new heights. No, I'm not referring to Comcast Corp., founded in 1963 by Ralph J. Roberts and now led by his son, Brian L. Roberts, who oversaw the transactions that turned it into a media giant. Today, I'm talking about a different Roberts family, which built a small specialty-drug company into something a Japanese pharmaceutical power felt was worth spending at least $800 million to acquire.
NEWS
December 11, 2000 | By Stephanie Doster, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two women sickened last week by a too-potent batch of the gout drug colchicine were listed in serious condition yesterday after they were transferred to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, hospital officials said. The women, ages 46 and 54, had been listed in critical condition at Paoli Memorial Hospital and were transferred on Friday. Lawrence Bachorik, a spokesman for the Food and Drug Administration, said 66 single-use vials of the drug were being recalled after a doctor in the area reported that three patients had become sick after receiving an injection from the potent batch.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2012 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
The last seven days of news from the region's life-sciences industry was a mix of messages involving expansion, succession, relocation, contraction, and conclusion. Iroko Pharmaceuticals L.L.C. cemented its reputation as a company to watch Wednesday when it celebrated the opening of its new offices at the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. Begun by veterans of the region's Big Pharma companies, Iroko has grown over the last five years to employ about 60 and could triple the number working in its new 56,412-square-foot building over the next few years.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Dr. Janani Rangaswami, For The Inquirer
Jose Alvarez lay doubled up in pain on a stretcher in an emergency room in New York. For the third time in three months, he had been caught unawares by an attack of gout, with excruciating pain in his toes and right knee. This time he was forced to cancel an important business trip to his hometown of Puebla, Mexico. Jose came from a family of artisans who crafted glazed earthen pottery. A talented craftsman who glazed his pots and exported them to New York, he often worked 18-hour days that recently had been punctuated by increasing fatigue and irritability.
NEWS
November 15, 2010
Drinks high in fructose raise the risk of getting gout Fructose-rich drinks are not just bad for your teeth - a recent study suggests these sugary liquids increase the risk of developing gout, a common and painful form of arthritis. Researchers from Boston analyzed data from 78,906 women in the Nurses' Health Study; none had a history of gout when the study began. After 22 years, 778 women had developed gout. Women who drank one serving of fructose-sweetened soda or juice a day had a 74 percent higher risk of gout than non-drinkers; those who had two or more servings daily had a 2.4-times higher risk.
NEWS
April 10, 2006 | By Brian Rademaekers FOR THE INQUIRER
Franklin: Eh! Oh! Eh! What have I done to merit these cruel sufferings? Gout: Many things: you have ate and drank too freely, and too much indulged those legs of yours in their indolence. Franklin: Who is it that accuses me? Gout: It is I, even I, the Gout. So begins Benjamin Franklin's dialogue with his "enemy" in a famous essay from 1780. The words now are plastered beside a grotesque wax model of a gouty foot in "The Medical World of Benjamin Franklin," a new exhibition at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2012 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pfizer is intent on shedding noncore businesses. AstraZeneca is intent on adding any small company that might bring revenue. Such were underlying motivations for billion-dollar deals announced Monday by the two pharmaceutical giants, both of which have operations in the Philadelphia region. Pfizer Inc. sold its infant nutrition division to Nestle SA for $11.85 billion while AstraZeneca P.L.C. spent $1.26 billion to buy San Diego-based Ardea Biosciences Inc., which has a promising, but not-yet-ready, medicine for gout.
SPORTS
February 19, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
On the day Roberto Alomar reported to camp on crutches, nursing a sprained left ankle, Baltimore Orioles owner Pete Angelos was quoted as saying umpire John Hirschbeck owes his second baseman an apology. Angelos said Alomar, who spit on Hirschbeck during an argument in a September game, was provoked with a profane epithet. "If you take literally what he said to the kid, he accused him of having a sexual relationship with his mother," Angelos told the Sun, of Baltimore. "Now, just because it's used a lot, rarely does anyone make that statement to anyone in a confrontational manner.
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NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Dr. Janani Rangaswami, For The Inquirer
Jose Alvarez lay doubled up in pain on a stretcher in an emergency room in New York. For the third time in three months, he had been caught unawares by an attack of gout, with excruciating pain in his toes and right knee. This time he was forced to cancel an important business trip to his hometown of Puebla, Mexico. Jose came from a family of artisans who crafted glazed earthen pottery. A talented craftsman who glazed his pots and exported them to New York, he often worked 18-hour days that recently had been punctuated by increasing fatigue and irritability.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The future looks dicey for the local operations of a decades-old Philadelphia drug company that succeeded in raising the price of a popular gout medicine by 100 times despite an outcry from sufferers of the painful affliction. URL Pharma, which won Food and Drug Administration approval in 2009 on a patented version of colchicine, a centuries-old treatment for gout, was split up and resold by its Japanese buyer, and workers at the Philadelphia locations don't know what will happen.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2012 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
The last seven days of news from the region's life-sciences industry was a mix of messages involving expansion, succession, relocation, contraction, and conclusion. Iroko Pharmaceuticals L.L.C. cemented its reputation as a company to watch Wednesday when it celebrated the opening of its new offices at the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. Begun by veterans of the region's Big Pharma companies, Iroko has grown over the last five years to employ about 60 and could triple the number working in its new 56,412-square-foot building over the next few years.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2012 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pfizer is intent on shedding noncore businesses. AstraZeneca is intent on adding any small company that might bring revenue. Such were underlying motivations for billion-dollar deals announced Monday by the two pharmaceutical giants, both of which have operations in the Philadelphia region. Pfizer Inc. sold its infant nutrition division to Nestle SA for $11.85 billion while AstraZeneca P.L.C. spent $1.26 billion to buy San Diego-based Ardea Biosciences Inc., which has a promising, but not-yet-ready, medicine for gout.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2012 | Michael Armstrong
Some think this is the classic Philadelphia story: Club boxer gets his shot at the heavyweight title and shocks the world. To me, the classic Philadelphia story is: Businessman starts a company. Son takes over and sends it to new heights. No, I'm not referring to Comcast Corp., founded in 1963 by Ralph J. Roberts and now led by his son, Brian L. Roberts, who oversaw the transactions that turned it into a media giant. Today, I'm talking about a different Roberts family, which built a small specialty-drug company into something a Japanese pharmaceutical power felt was worth spending at least $800 million to acquire.
NEWS
November 15, 2010
Drinks high in fructose raise the risk of getting gout Fructose-rich drinks are not just bad for your teeth - a recent study suggests these sugary liquids increase the risk of developing gout, a common and painful form of arthritis. Researchers from Boston analyzed data from 78,906 women in the Nurses' Health Study; none had a history of gout when the study began. After 22 years, 778 women had developed gout. Women who drank one serving of fructose-sweetened soda or juice a day had a 74 percent higher risk of gout than non-drinkers; those who had two or more servings daily had a 2.4-times higher risk.
SPORTS
September 26, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Mike Piazza's single snapped a seventh-inning tie and the visiting San Diego Padres got stingy relief after starter David Wells was scratched because of gout, beating the sagging St. Louis Cardinals, 6-5, last night in a matchup of National League division leaders. Brian Giles hit a three-run double in a five-run second and the bullpen allowed three hits in 5 2/3 innings to help the Padres win for the 10th time in 13 games. San Diego has a two-game lead in the NL West over idle Los Angeles with six games to play.
NEWS
April 10, 2006 | By Brian Rademaekers FOR THE INQUIRER
Franklin: Eh! Oh! Eh! What have I done to merit these cruel sufferings? Gout: Many things: you have ate and drank too freely, and too much indulged those legs of yours in their indolence. Franklin: Who is it that accuses me? Gout: It is I, even I, the Gout. So begins Benjamin Franklin's dialogue with his "enemy" in a famous essay from 1780. The words now are plastered beside a grotesque wax model of a gouty foot in "The Medical World of Benjamin Franklin," a new exhibition at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 16, 2001 | By Donald C. Drake INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Hobbs, a 78-year-old Norristown retiree, went to the King of Prussia mall eager to show his luncheon buddy Phil Tavani the story he had clipped from the newspaper for him. The article told how some medicines aggravated gout. Hobbs, who used to be a customer-service agent for a carpet company, thought Tavani should know about it because he had a bad case of the arthritic disease. It was 11 on a Monday morning. He knew he would find Tavani sitting near the fountain in the J.C. Penney Court, where all the fellows hung out. But Tavani was not there, which was strange because it was almost time for lunch in the food court, and most of the guys arrived in time for that.
NEWS
December 21, 2000 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A bad batch of gout medicine that caused two Chester County women to be considered for heart transplants last week was distributed to six physicians around the country, an FDA spokesman said yesterday. But the drug, colchicine, which was ten times stronger than its label indicated, apparently harmed only the two women plus a third Pennsylvania patient, FDA spokesman Brad Stone said, adding that "no more adverse reaction reports have come in. " Stone said the drug's manufacturer, Amram of Rathdrum, Idaho, recalled what remained of the 66 injectable ampules that had been distributed after the two Pennsylvania women became critically ill. "All of it has been accounted for and recovered," Stone said.
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