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NEWS
March 5, 2013
IF MOST OF US shrugged when sequestration kicked in on Friday morning, chalk it up to the cry-wolf Congress that already took us to the so-called fiscal cliff before retreating. But this time, it's real, and the random hacking cuts that the government is now forcing on itself - $1.2 trillion over 10 years - is the equivalent of using a chain saw to cure a hangnail rather than a more-thoughtful surgery. The cuts won't be fairly distributed - the chain saw will be lopping limbs from defense, immigration, education, housing, and disaster and emergency relief.
NEWS
May 12, 2009
CENTRAL planning by the Washington elite, elected and appointed, determined that Chrysler, owned by shareholders, investors and banks, should be forced into bankruptcy. The new owners would become 55 percent the United Auto Workers, 35 percent a foreign auto company, 10 percent we the taxpayers, along with another 5-10 billion tax dollars in addition to the $8 billion lost in the bankruptcy. In essence, Washington decided that it would force property to be transferred from one owner and given to another, along with a bunch of our tax dollars.
NEWS
July 5, 1986
Ronald Reagan got a lot of mileage out of his continual talk of our need for less government. After six years of government under Reagan, our government somhow got bigger than ever. That doesn't mean the Reaganisti haven't called off the federales who were harassing your local industrialist for putting poison in your drinking water. It doesn't mean they haven't made headway in building the character of the poor by denying them federal help. What it means is that the Reagan administration, behind the genial Charlie McCarthy figure of the president, has built up the government in other ways.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | By Bridgett M. Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here in the land of political lunches, tour-bus traffic jams and skyscraping monuments is where two Montgomery County senior citizens debated on Capitol Hill whether to cut the nation's defense or increase taxes. On Tuesday, Estelle Goodman, 80, of Wyncote, and Alfred Webb, 76, of Plymouth Meeting, tried to balance the federal budget for 1989. They had three hours. They failed. It was OK, though. The point of the task was to teach Goodman and Webb, along with 171 other senior citizens, the difficulty inherent in deciding how to spend 226 million people's money.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Zarar Khan and Munir Ahmed, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Pakistani officials struck a deal late Thursday with a fiery Muslim cleric to end four days of antigovernment protests by thousands of his supporters that largely paralyzed the capital and put intense pressure on the government. The demonstration came at a time when the government is facing challenges on several fronts, including from the country's top court. The Supreme Court ordered the arrest of the prime minister earlier in the week in connection with a corruption case, but the government's anticorruption chief refused to act Thursday, citing a lack of evidence.
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | BY RODNIE JAMISON
The time is now for us the people to take charge of our own destinies, to take, if you will, responsibility for our own lives - all of the people, now, before things descend too far out of hand. Our taking the responsibility is, after all, what this thing called democracy was intended to be about. My source for this notion is our Declaration of Independence. Just to remind you, that pivotal document states " . . . all men are endowed by the Creator with certain inalienable rights . . . that among these rights are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness" (or of property)
NEWS
February 7, 1995 | For The Inquirer / MICHAEL PLUNKETT
Thirty students from Cherry Hill schools got a taste of government yesterday at the municipal building. They met with key city officials.
NEWS
October 15, 1986
I agree on the part of President Reagan's first inaugural address in which he said, "Government is the problem. " His appeal has been as the champion of the individual against big institutions, the promise of liberty against the oppression of government. I state this in response to the Sept. 28 Review & Opinion article by Sidney Blumenthal, "Rehnquist's ideology favors government authority. " Christopher Seese Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By Lisa Schwartz, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Voorhees voters may be asked if they want to scrap the township's 93-year- old form of government. Spurred by interest in making government more accountable to residents, the Township Committee has begun a process that could bring a change from the committee to one of three other types of government: mayor-council, council- manager or mayor-council-manager. The Township Committee is considering an ordinance to place a question on the November ballot. The question would ask voters if they want to elect a commission to study the township's form of government.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The patient with the bad heart valve will be in his 60s, say, someone who tires easily because of impaired blood flow but is otherwise in pretty good health. An informed consumer, he has seen the ads about the new way to fix the problem without having a surgeon crack open his chest. A slender catheter is threaded through the groin, a new aortic valve implanted, and the patient is home in a few days. Can he sign up? For now, Mark B. Anderson has to tell him no. "Surgery is still the gold standard," said Anderson, chair of cardiothoracic surgery at Einstein Healthcare Network.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Look! Up in the sky! It's a bird. . . . It's a plane. . . . No, it's a drone. The federal government is finalizing new rules for using unmanned small aircraft - commonly called drones - for uses such as monitoring oil fields and pipelines, and real-estate photography. The regulations are eagerly awaited by businesses, including the news media, the motion-picture industry, and farmers who say remote-controlled mini-aircraft equipped with cameras could benefit people and create jobs.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delaware County defense contractor was sentenced to more than three years in prison Friday for bilking the government out of $1.2 million tied to contracts his company received to supply parts for military helicopters. In addition to the prison term, Kenneth Narzikul, 60, of Media, was ordered to pay restitution as well as a $7,500 fine. Narzikul pleaded guilty in August to fraud, obstructing a federal audit, and making false claims after federal authorities accused his company, NP Precision Inc., of collecting partial payments it did not earn on two contracts to manufacture parts for Chinook helicopters.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James A. McGovern, 91, of Lower Gwynedd, a former investigator in the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office, died Friday, Jan. 2, of lung cancer at AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center in Atlantic City. Mr. McGovern served as an investigator for the Philadelphia medical examiner, and later for the Delaware County Medical Examiner's Office. He was called Feb. 26, 1957, when the body of a boy aged 4 to 6 was found in a discarded bassinet carton on Susquehanna Road between Pine and Verree Roads in Fox Chase.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
AL FERGUSON was an exuberant and excitable sports fan. During one of the Flyers' runs for the Stanley Cup in the 1970s, he got so excited watching a game on TV that he leaped up and knocked a tile out of the ceiling. It's not recorded what his wife thought of that mishap, but Al treated it with his usual good humor. "That didn't stop the excitement of the game," his family said. "Instead, it was something to laugh about. " Alfred F. Ferguson, who overcame polio as a child; a lifelong civil servant, holding important positions in state and federal agencies; a devotee of the Jersey Shore and all its delights; and a loyal family man, died Dec. 13 after a long battle with cancer.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Responding to housing-industry concerns that tightened mortgage-credit rules would hamstring the critical first-time-buyer market, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will offer 3 percent down-payment loans to qualified borrowers. Fannie's My Community Mortgage program, open to first-time buyers with a 620 minimum credit score, starts this week. Freddie's Home Possible Advantage, available to all qualified buyers, begins in March. Andrew Bon Salle, a Fannie Mae executive vice president, said his program's goal was to help qualified borrowers gain access to mortgages, but added that it would not "solve all of the challenges around access to credit.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
IT APPEARS more heads will roll - maybe already have - in the porn scandal that has consumed our state government. Renee George Martin, a spokeswoman for state Attorney General Kathleen Kane, yesterday confirmed that her office's human resources department is wrapping up an investigation into at least 30 current employees who used state computers or email accounts to send or receive pornography. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review yesterday reported that "six or more" employees have been fired or offered early retirement.
NEWS
October 22, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
T HE CITY shells out a pretty penny every year to settle lawsuits based on allegations of police misconduct. MuckRock.com, which bills itself as a "collaborative news site" that helps journalists, researchers and citizens analyze and share government documents, posted an online report yesterday that looked at how Philadelphia's annual payouts stack up against those in a handful of other large cities. The findings might not surprise you. The city has shelled out more than $40 million to settle 584 of the 1,223 police-misconduct lawsuits - think wrongful-shooting deaths, excessive force or illegal searches - filed since January 2009, the website reported.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | BY DOYLE MCMANUS
  WHATEVER happened to good old American know-how? The nation that invented modern management seems to be suffering a crisis of competence. The Secret Service can't protect the White House. Public-health authorities can't get their arms around a one-man Ebola outbreak. The army we trained in Iraq collapsed as soon as it was attacked by Islamic extremists, and our own veterans can't get the care they need at Veterans Affairs hospitals. And, lest we forget, it was only a year ago that the White House rolled out its national health insurance program, only to see its website grind to a halt.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Defense lawyers for six Philadelphia narcotics officers accused of robbing and violently attacking drug dealers took aim at the criminal case against their clients Monday, calling it a series of weak allegations built on the testimony of "trashy riffraff" and one rogue officer. They also accused federal prosecutors of omitting key facts in laying out their indictment, including that many of the raids now deemed criminal acts were witnessed by police supervisors and members of other law enforcement agencies.
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