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NEWS
March 5, 2013
IF MOST OF US shrugged when sequestration kicked in on Friday morning, chalk it up to the cry-wolf Congress that already took us to the so-called fiscal cliff before retreating. But this time, it's real, and the random hacking cuts that the government is now forcing on itself - $1.2 trillion over 10 years - is the equivalent of using a chain saw to cure a hangnail rather than a more-thoughtful surgery. The cuts won't be fairly distributed - the chain saw will be lopping limbs from defense, immigration, education, housing, and disaster and emergency relief.
NEWS
May 12, 2009
CENTRAL planning by the Washington elite, elected and appointed, determined that Chrysler, owned by shareholders, investors and banks, should be forced into bankruptcy. The new owners would become 55 percent the United Auto Workers, 35 percent a foreign auto company, 10 percent we the taxpayers, along with another 5-10 billion tax dollars in addition to the $8 billion lost in the bankruptcy. In essence, Washington decided that it would force property to be transferred from one owner and given to another, along with a bunch of our tax dollars.
NEWS
July 5, 1986
Ronald Reagan got a lot of mileage out of his continual talk of our need for less government. After six years of government under Reagan, our government somhow got bigger than ever. That doesn't mean the Reaganisti haven't called off the federales who were harassing your local industrialist for putting poison in your drinking water. It doesn't mean they haven't made headway in building the character of the poor by denying them federal help. What it means is that the Reagan administration, behind the genial Charlie McCarthy figure of the president, has built up the government in other ways.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | By Bridgett M. Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here in the land of political lunches, tour-bus traffic jams and skyscraping monuments is where two Montgomery County senior citizens debated on Capitol Hill whether to cut the nation's defense or increase taxes. On Tuesday, Estelle Goodman, 80, of Wyncote, and Alfred Webb, 76, of Plymouth Meeting, tried to balance the federal budget for 1989. They had three hours. They failed. It was OK, though. The point of the task was to teach Goodman and Webb, along with 171 other senior citizens, the difficulty inherent in deciding how to spend 226 million people's money.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Zarar Khan and Munir Ahmed, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Pakistani officials struck a deal late Thursday with a fiery Muslim cleric to end four days of antigovernment protests by thousands of his supporters that largely paralyzed the capital and put intense pressure on the government. The demonstration came at a time when the government is facing challenges on several fronts, including from the country's top court. The Supreme Court ordered the arrest of the prime minister earlier in the week in connection with a corruption case, but the government's anticorruption chief refused to act Thursday, citing a lack of evidence.
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | BY RODNIE JAMISON
The time is now for us the people to take charge of our own destinies, to take, if you will, responsibility for our own lives - all of the people, now, before things descend too far out of hand. Our taking the responsibility is, after all, what this thing called democracy was intended to be about. My source for this notion is our Declaration of Independence. Just to remind you, that pivotal document states " . . . all men are endowed by the Creator with certain inalienable rights . . . that among these rights are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness" (or of property)
NEWS
February 7, 1995 | For The Inquirer / MICHAEL PLUNKETT
Thirty students from Cherry Hill schools got a taste of government yesterday at the municipal building. They met with key city officials.
NEWS
October 15, 1986
I agree on the part of President Reagan's first inaugural address in which he said, "Government is the problem. " His appeal has been as the champion of the individual against big institutions, the promise of liberty against the oppression of government. I state this in response to the Sept. 28 Review & Opinion article by Sidney Blumenthal, "Rehnquist's ideology favors government authority. " Christopher Seese Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By Lisa Schwartz, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Voorhees voters may be asked if they want to scrap the township's 93-year- old form of government. Spurred by interest in making government more accountable to residents, the Township Committee has begun a process that could bring a change from the committee to one of three other types of government: mayor-council, council- manager or mayor-council-manager. The Township Committee is considering an ordinance to place a question on the November ballot. The question would ask voters if they want to elect a commission to study the township's form of government.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
With four years separating Medford Township from a fiscal crisis that nearly put it in default, not to mention an embarrassing sex scandal involving its former mayor, town leaders are preparing to host the latest in a series of workshops called the Local Government Institute designed to educate residents about how local government works. Starting in September, elected officials, board members, emergency management leaders, and others will discuss the workings of their boards and agencies in biweekly sessions open to the public.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter's office said Tuesday that it had established six centers where residents will be able to get help applying for a host of government benefits, including food stamps, Medicare, and tax breaks. "Every year, eligible Philadelphia residents leave millions of dollars on the table by not enrolling in critical benefits programs," said Eva Gladstein, who heads the mayor's Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity. In response, the city has established BenePhilly, a program that aims to place counselors trained in benefits at existing social-service agencies, including Project HOME and Catholic Social Services.
NEWS
July 5, 2014
What better occasion than Independence Day to reflect on a political movement whose adherents insist its essence is embodied in one of the seminal events of this country's birth, the Boston Tea Party? The spirit of protest is what today's tea-party patriots refer to as they liken themselves to those early Americans who, in 1773, hurled an East India Company cargo into Boston Harbor rather than pay a tax levied by the British Parliament with no colonial representation. With names like the Berks Sons of Liberty, Northeast Pennsylvania Spirit of 1776, Defenders of Freedom, and Tea Party Time Network, today's purported scions of the colonial rebels try to incite the passions of Americans who believe government looms too large in their lives.
NEWS
July 2, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three environmental groups sued the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Monday, contending that it improperly approved a Pennsylvania plan aimed at addressing haze pollution. They say the plan fails to limit emissions of haze-causing chemicals from major facilities in the state, and that iconic parks and wilderness areas - from Shenandoah National Park in Virginia to the Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey and then to as far as Acadia National Park in Maine - suffer because of it. "The law on the books says we need to deal with the pollution choking our national parks," said Matt Elliott, the Pennsylvania and Delaware program manager with the National Parks Conservation Association, one of the groups that sued.
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
TRENTON - State Senate President Stephen Sweeney said Thursday that he would give Rutgers University 90 days to change its governance structure, based on an internal university report, or he would move forward with controversial legislation to expand its governing board. If the board of governors and board of trustees do not act, Sweeney (D., Gloucester) said, he would deliver the legislation to the Assembly. "The proposition is simple: Rutgers has a chance to reform itself or the state will reform Rutgers," Sweeney said in a statement about an hour after the Senate passed the bill on a 22-13 vote.
NEWS
June 4, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
TRENTON - The ongoing fight between Rutgers University and New Jersey Senate President Stephen Sweeney flared again Monday as a legislative panel backed his controversial proposal to expand the school's board of governors. The bill would increase from 15 members to 19. Twelve would be political appointees - 10 by the governor, one by the Senate president, and one by the Assembly speaker. The 59-member board of trustees would continue to appoint the seven remaining members of the board of governors.
NEWS
May 13, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
When a former staffer to Gov. Christie appeared last week before the legislative panel probing the George Washington Bridge controversy, her testimony went beyond the question of who ordered the September lane closures. Lawmakers questioning Christina Renna also struck at a broader issue: To what degree had Christie's reelection campaign infiltrated the functions of government? Tuesday's hearing shed light on the inner workings of the governor's Office of Legislative and Intergovernmental Affairs, an outreach office where staffers tasked with assisting mayors also worked last year to secure the mayors' endorsements for Christie's reelection.
NEWS
April 22, 2014
IN A CITY where it's hard to find agreement on anything, we seem to be united in our disgust at the owners of the 100,000 tax-delinquent properties in the city. Coming up a close second is the history of noncollection of those taxes by the city - both forces leading to a dangerous decline of buildings, neighborhoods and values. Turns out that being a tax deadbeat is not the lowest you can go after all. No - that position is reserved for the officials at the Board of Revision of Taxes, who are ever-so-slowly moving their way through property-tax appeals, not because the appeals are complicated but because they don't think they need to work any faster until they get a pay raise.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The 18-story city office building at the foot of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, formerly the headquarters for Bell Telephone Co. of Pennsylvania, will be closed through the weekend as contractors try to repair the building's elevators, damaged by water from a broken pipe. Mayor Nutter said Wednesday that the 1,900 workers assigned to various departments inside the building should check with their supervisors to see if they should report to alternate work locations for essential services Thursday.
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