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NEWS
March 5, 2013
IF MOST OF US shrugged when sequestration kicked in on Friday morning, chalk it up to the cry-wolf Congress that already took us to the so-called fiscal cliff before retreating. But this time, it's real, and the random hacking cuts that the government is now forcing on itself - $1.2 trillion over 10 years - is the equivalent of using a chain saw to cure a hangnail rather than a more-thoughtful surgery. The cuts won't be fairly distributed - the chain saw will be lopping limbs from defense, immigration, education, housing, and disaster and emergency relief.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Zarar Khan and Munir Ahmed, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Pakistani officials struck a deal late Thursday with a fiery Muslim cleric to end four days of antigovernment protests by thousands of his supporters that largely paralyzed the capital and put intense pressure on the government. The demonstration came at a time when the government is facing challenges on several fronts, including from the country's top court. The Supreme Court ordered the arrest of the prime minister earlier in the week in connection with a corruption case, but the government's anticorruption chief refused to act Thursday, citing a lack of evidence.
NEWS
May 12, 2009
CENTRAL planning by the Washington elite, elected and appointed, determined that Chrysler, owned by shareholders, investors and banks, should be forced into bankruptcy. The new owners would become 55 percent the United Auto Workers, 35 percent a foreign auto company, 10 percent we the taxpayers, along with another 5-10 billion tax dollars in addition to the $8 billion lost in the bankruptcy. In essence, Washington decided that it would force property to be transferred from one owner and given to another, along with a bunch of our tax dollars.
NEWS
July 5, 1986
Ronald Reagan got a lot of mileage out of his continual talk of our need for less government. After six years of government under Reagan, our government somhow got bigger than ever. That doesn't mean the Reaganisti haven't called off the federales who were harassing your local industrialist for putting poison in your drinking water. It doesn't mean they haven't made headway in building the character of the poor by denying them federal help. What it means is that the Reagan administration, behind the genial Charlie McCarthy figure of the president, has built up the government in other ways.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | By Bridgett M. Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here in the land of political lunches, tour-bus traffic jams and skyscraping monuments is where two Montgomery County senior citizens debated on Capitol Hill whether to cut the nation's defense or increase taxes. On Tuesday, Estelle Goodman, 80, of Wyncote, and Alfred Webb, 76, of Plymouth Meeting, tried to balance the federal budget for 1989. They had three hours. They failed. It was OK, though. The point of the task was to teach Goodman and Webb, along with 171 other senior citizens, the difficulty inherent in deciding how to spend 226 million people's money.
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | BY RODNIE JAMISON
The time is now for us the people to take charge of our own destinies, to take, if you will, responsibility for our own lives - all of the people, now, before things descend too far out of hand. Our taking the responsibility is, after all, what this thing called democracy was intended to be about. My source for this notion is our Declaration of Independence. Just to remind you, that pivotal document states " . . . all men are endowed by the Creator with certain inalienable rights . . . that among these rights are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness" (or of property)
NEWS
February 7, 1995 | For The Inquirer / MICHAEL PLUNKETT
Thirty students from Cherry Hill schools got a taste of government yesterday at the municipal building. They met with key city officials.
NEWS
October 15, 1986
I agree on the part of President Reagan's first inaugural address in which he said, "Government is the problem. " His appeal has been as the champion of the individual against big institutions, the promise of liberty against the oppression of government. I state this in response to the Sept. 28 Review & Opinion article by Sidney Blumenthal, "Rehnquist's ideology favors government authority. " Christopher Seese Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By Lisa Schwartz, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Voorhees voters may be asked if they want to scrap the township's 93-year- old form of government. Spurred by interest in making government more accountable to residents, the Township Committee has begun a process that could bring a change from the committee to one of three other types of government: mayor-council, council- manager or mayor-council-manager. The Township Committee is considering an ordinance to place a question on the November ballot. The question would ask voters if they want to elect a commission to study the township's form of government.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Turns out there's a truck tunnel beneath the Gallery at Market East. It's been there since the structure was built in the 1970s - a huge, hidden space defined by loading docks and trash bins, used as a means to deliver merchandise, food, and supplies when the mall was in its heyday. "It actually is pretty cool," said Brian Abernathy, executive director of the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority. "Like a subterranean cavern. " The question of who controls it and who may use it in the future stood among a half-dozen complex matters considered and resolved Thursday, as the authority took the first official step toward placing control of the rundown mall into the hands of a developer who plans a complete remake.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
VETERAN DEFENSE attorney Jack McMahon, known for being aggressive and combative, quickly pounced at the outset yesterday in his cross-examination of the government's star witness, ex-narcotics cop Jeffrey Walker. "I'd appreciate it if you could look at me when we talk," McMahon told Walker after greeting him. "Sure, no problem," said Walker, 46, who has been in custody for almost two years after his arrest in an FBI sting in May 2013. McMahon, the attorney for Brian Reynolds, one of six ex-narcotics cops on trial, accused by the feds of robbing suspected drug dealers, has been the leadoff hitter on the defense team, the first of the six defense attorneys to cross-examine all witnesses.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN CONNIE MOSES was a student at William Penn High School for Girls, her friends didn't need a dictionary or a thesaurus or a calculator. They had Connie. "Long before there were computers, spell check or auto correct, there was Connie," her family said. "She was a walking Webster's Dictionary and calculator for everyone. " Connie carried this attention to detail and her amazing memory through her life, taking them to her job as a supply analyst for the Naval Aviation Supply Depot, and as the undisputed authority on the Bible.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. Even on an early spring morning still tightly wrapped in winter, Atsion Lake in Wharton State Forest has that "go home and get your kayak" look. The wind whipping the icy-cold, cedar-colored water over the edge of the deserted beach is enough to recommend a two-month postponement. But that means more time to explore the rest of Shamong, which has a long history and a great deal to look at. Leave enough time for a crab melt on rye for lunch at the Shamong Diner on Willow Grove Road and a visit to Valenzano Winery on Route 206, where you can sample the "Shamong Red. " In the Southern Unami dialect of the Leni-Lenape,   Shamong   means place of the horn , owing to the abundance of deer that sustained members of the tribe who lived there.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The next Netanyahu government will face challenges at home, on its borders, and abroad. A2. Trudy Rubin: Fear-mongering puts Israel at greater risk. A14.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The patient with the bad heart valve will be in his 60s, say, someone who tires easily because of impaired blood flow but is otherwise in pretty good health. An informed consumer, he has seen the ads about the new way to fix the problem without having a surgeon crack open his chest. A slender catheter is threaded through the groin, a new aortic valve implanted, and the patient is home in a few days. Can he sign up? For now, Mark B. Anderson has to tell him no. "Surgery is still the gold standard," said Anderson, chair of cardiothoracic surgery at Einstein Healthcare Network.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Look! Up in the sky! It's a bird. . . . It's a plane. . . . No, it's a drone. The federal government is finalizing new rules for using unmanned small aircraft - commonly called drones - for uses such as monitoring oil fields and pipelines, and real-estate photography. The regulations are eagerly awaited by businesses, including the news media, the motion-picture industry, and farmers who say remote-controlled mini-aircraft equipped with cameras could benefit people and create jobs.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delaware County defense contractor was sentenced to more than three years in prison Friday for bilking the government out of $1.2 million tied to contracts his company received to supply parts for military helicopters. In addition to the prison term, Kenneth Narzikul, 60, of Media, was ordered to pay restitution as well as a $7,500 fine. Narzikul pleaded guilty in August to fraud, obstructing a federal audit, and making false claims after federal authorities accused his company, NP Precision Inc., of collecting partial payments it did not earn on two contracts to manufacture parts for Chinook helicopters.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James A. McGovern, 91, of Lower Gwynedd, a former investigator in the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office, died Friday, Jan. 2, of lung cancer at AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center in Atlantic City. Mr. McGovern served as an investigator for the Philadelphia medical examiner, and later for the Delaware County Medical Examiner's Office. He was called Feb. 26, 1957, when the body of a boy aged 4 to 6 was found in a discarded bassinet carton on Susquehanna Road between Pine and Verree Roads in Fox Chase.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
AL FERGUSON was an exuberant and excitable sports fan. During one of the Flyers' runs for the Stanley Cup in the 1970s, he got so excited watching a game on TV that he leaped up and knocked a tile out of the ceiling. It's not recorded what his wife thought of that mishap, but Al treated it with his usual good humor. "That didn't stop the excitement of the game," his family said. "Instead, it was something to laugh about. " Alfred F. Ferguson, who overcame polio as a child; a lifelong civil servant, holding important positions in state and federal agencies; a devotee of the Jersey Shore and all its delights; and a loyal family man, died Dec. 13 after a long battle with cancer.
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