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NEWS
March 5, 2013
IF MOST OF US shrugged when sequestration kicked in on Friday morning, chalk it up to the cry-wolf Congress that already took us to the so-called fiscal cliff before retreating. But this time, it's real, and the random hacking cuts that the government is now forcing on itself - $1.2 trillion over 10 years - is the equivalent of using a chain saw to cure a hangnail rather than a more-thoughtful surgery. The cuts won't be fairly distributed - the chain saw will be lopping limbs from defense, immigration, education, housing, and disaster and emergency relief.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Zarar Khan and Munir Ahmed, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Pakistani officials struck a deal late Thursday with a fiery Muslim cleric to end four days of antigovernment protests by thousands of his supporters that largely paralyzed the capital and put intense pressure on the government. The demonstration came at a time when the government is facing challenges on several fronts, including from the country's top court. The Supreme Court ordered the arrest of the prime minister earlier in the week in connection with a corruption case, but the government's anticorruption chief refused to act Thursday, citing a lack of evidence.
NEWS
May 12, 2009
CENTRAL planning by the Washington elite, elected and appointed, determined that Chrysler, owned by shareholders, investors and banks, should be forced into bankruptcy. The new owners would become 55 percent the United Auto Workers, 35 percent a foreign auto company, 10 percent we the taxpayers, along with another 5-10 billion tax dollars in addition to the $8 billion lost in the bankruptcy. In essence, Washington decided that it would force property to be transferred from one owner and given to another, along with a bunch of our tax dollars.
NEWS
July 5, 1986
Ronald Reagan got a lot of mileage out of his continual talk of our need for less government. After six years of government under Reagan, our government somhow got bigger than ever. That doesn't mean the Reaganisti haven't called off the federales who were harassing your local industrialist for putting poison in your drinking water. It doesn't mean they haven't made headway in building the character of the poor by denying them federal help. What it means is that the Reagan administration, behind the genial Charlie McCarthy figure of the president, has built up the government in other ways.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | By Bridgett M. Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here in the land of political lunches, tour-bus traffic jams and skyscraping monuments is where two Montgomery County senior citizens debated on Capitol Hill whether to cut the nation's defense or increase taxes. On Tuesday, Estelle Goodman, 80, of Wyncote, and Alfred Webb, 76, of Plymouth Meeting, tried to balance the federal budget for 1989. They had three hours. They failed. It was OK, though. The point of the task was to teach Goodman and Webb, along with 171 other senior citizens, the difficulty inherent in deciding how to spend 226 million people's money.
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | BY RODNIE JAMISON
The time is now for us the people to take charge of our own destinies, to take, if you will, responsibility for our own lives - all of the people, now, before things descend too far out of hand. Our taking the responsibility is, after all, what this thing called democracy was intended to be about. My source for this notion is our Declaration of Independence. Just to remind you, that pivotal document states " . . . all men are endowed by the Creator with certain inalienable rights . . . that among these rights are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness" (or of property)
NEWS
February 7, 1995 | For The Inquirer / MICHAEL PLUNKETT
Thirty students from Cherry Hill schools got a taste of government yesterday at the municipal building. They met with key city officials.
NEWS
October 15, 1986
I agree on the part of President Reagan's first inaugural address in which he said, "Government is the problem. " His appeal has been as the champion of the individual against big institutions, the promise of liberty against the oppression of government. I state this in response to the Sept. 28 Review & Opinion article by Sidney Blumenthal, "Rehnquist's ideology favors government authority. " Christopher Seese Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By Lisa Schwartz, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Voorhees voters may be asked if they want to scrap the township's 93-year- old form of government. Spurred by interest in making government more accountable to residents, the Township Committee has begun a process that could bring a change from the committee to one of three other types of government: mayor-council, council- manager or mayor-council-manager. The Township Committee is considering an ordinance to place a question on the November ballot. The question would ask voters if they want to elect a commission to study the township's form of government.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 11, 2016
By John Halpin and Daniella Gibbs Leger The American public faces a dilemma. Voters want the government to do more to provide economic security and help rebuild the nation, but they don't trust the people running the government to do what's right. This creates a self-reinforcing cycle of government seemingly underperforming in voters' eyes and trust in government continuing to diminish. If these trends are not addressed, citizens may steadily lose faith that collective action of any sort can work.
NEWS
May 7, 2016
Gigantic government's complexity and opacity provide innumerable opportunities for opportunists to act unconstrained by clear law or effective supervision. Today's example, involving the government's expropriation of hundreds of billions of dollars, features three sets of unsympathetic actors - a grasping federal government, a few hedge funds nimble at exploiting the commingling of government and the private sector, and two anomalous institutions that should never have existed. The two are the "government-sponsored enterprises" (GSEs)
NEWS
April 25, 2016
Usually at this point in the primary process, Pennsylvania voters are rubber-stamping a presumptive nominee who will cruise to a first-ballot nomination at the national convention. Not this year. On Tuesday, Keystone State Republicans can have an impact. They can send a message. And if the message is, We want a shot at putting Pennsylvania in the red column in November, their choice is clear: Ohio Gov. John Kasich. Start with experience. As governor since 2011, the 63-year-old Western Pennsylvania native has more time as an executive than his two GOP opponents combined - the kind in which you can't fire someone because you didn't get your way. He was also a state senator and served 18 years in Congress.
NEWS
March 28, 2016
ISSUE | PUBLIC SERVANTS Eakin's example scares one straight My father always said, "Whatever you do, stay out of the courts and hospitals. " I once figured he meant not to get sick or in trouble. The older I get, the more I realize the second part meant not to deal with lawyers or judges. The Inquirer's reporting on former Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice J. Michael Eakin certainly confirms that. I am glad he resigned; I am sorry he faces a limited financial penalty ("Eakin to Keep Pension, Pay Fine," Friday)
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf is calling on the legislature to champion good government and curb the influence of special interests. At a news conference Thursday in Pittsburgh, Wolf said banning gifts, imposing limits on campaign contributions, and requiring public officials to disclose in more detail their outside income are among measures he believes would strengthen public trust in the government. "Pennsylvanians need to have confidence in the decisions made by their government - that those decisions are the product of a robust competition of ideas - not rewards to special interests with the deepest pockets," the governor said.
NEWS
March 16, 2016
By Charles Lewis The United States has a noisy and utterly imperfect representational democracy, disorderly and dysfunctional in many ways. But as Founding Father James Madison famously observed, "A popular Government, without popular information, or the means of acquiring it, is but a Prologue to a Farce or a Tragedy; or perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance: And a people who mean to be their own Governors, must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives. " Unfortunately, in terms of a national "right to know" law, it took 144 years for the American people to begin to arm themselves with palpable knowledge about their government.
NEWS
March 9, 2016
By Neal McCluskey The cost of college is almost certainly too high, and a consequence of that is alarming student debt. Does that mean our goal should be to make college debt free? Depends how you do it. First, let's be clear: While the cost of college is probably much higher than it should be, and millions of people enter but never finish, a degree still tends to pay off handsomely, with the average graduate making far more over her lifetime - some estimate $1 million more - than someone who ended their education after high school.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Airline passengers' complaints to the federal government were up 29.8 percent last year compared with 2014 levels, according to the U.S. Transportation Department's Air Travel Consumer Report, released Thursday. During 2015, the department received 20,170 consumer complaints, up from 15,539 the year before. The bulk of the complaints, 6,433, were about flight cancellations, delays, and misconnections, while 3,133 were baggage problems, the Bureau of Transportation Statistics said.
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