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NEWS
September 2, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Hosting the Democratic National Convention was a boost for the city, according to a survey of Philadelphians released Wednesday, but distrust in government remains high. The survey, conducted by the Committee of Seventy, the good-government group, and Temple University's Institute for Survey Research found that 82 percent of respondents thought the convention was a good thing for the city. About one-third said they were more likely to vote because the convention occurred in Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 5, 2013
IF MOST OF US shrugged when sequestration kicked in on Friday morning, chalk it up to the cry-wolf Congress that already took us to the so-called fiscal cliff before retreating. But this time, it's real, and the random hacking cuts that the government is now forcing on itself - $1.2 trillion over 10 years - is the equivalent of using a chain saw to cure a hangnail rather than a more-thoughtful surgery. The cuts won't be fairly distributed - the chain saw will be lopping limbs from defense, immigration, education, housing, and disaster and emergency relief.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Zarar Khan and Munir Ahmed, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Pakistani officials struck a deal late Thursday with a fiery Muslim cleric to end four days of antigovernment protests by thousands of his supporters that largely paralyzed the capital and put intense pressure on the government. The demonstration came at a time when the government is facing challenges on several fronts, including from the country's top court. The Supreme Court ordered the arrest of the prime minister earlier in the week in connection with a corruption case, but the government's anticorruption chief refused to act Thursday, citing a lack of evidence.
NEWS
May 12, 2009
CENTRAL planning by the Washington elite, elected and appointed, determined that Chrysler, owned by shareholders, investors and banks, should be forced into bankruptcy. The new owners would become 55 percent the United Auto Workers, 35 percent a foreign auto company, 10 percent we the taxpayers, along with another 5-10 billion tax dollars in addition to the $8 billion lost in the bankruptcy. In essence, Washington decided that it would force property to be transferred from one owner and given to another, along with a bunch of our tax dollars.
NEWS
July 5, 1986
Ronald Reagan got a lot of mileage out of his continual talk of our need for less government. After six years of government under Reagan, our government somhow got bigger than ever. That doesn't mean the Reaganisti haven't called off the federales who were harassing your local industrialist for putting poison in your drinking water. It doesn't mean they haven't made headway in building the character of the poor by denying them federal help. What it means is that the Reagan administration, behind the genial Charlie McCarthy figure of the president, has built up the government in other ways.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | By Bridgett M. Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here in the land of political lunches, tour-bus traffic jams and skyscraping monuments is where two Montgomery County senior citizens debated on Capitol Hill whether to cut the nation's defense or increase taxes. On Tuesday, Estelle Goodman, 80, of Wyncote, and Alfred Webb, 76, of Plymouth Meeting, tried to balance the federal budget for 1989. They had three hours. They failed. It was OK, though. The point of the task was to teach Goodman and Webb, along with 171 other senior citizens, the difficulty inherent in deciding how to spend 226 million people's money.
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | BY RODNIE JAMISON
The time is now for us the people to take charge of our own destinies, to take, if you will, responsibility for our own lives - all of the people, now, before things descend too far out of hand. Our taking the responsibility is, after all, what this thing called democracy was intended to be about. My source for this notion is our Declaration of Independence. Just to remind you, that pivotal document states " . . . all men are endowed by the Creator with certain inalienable rights . . . that among these rights are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness" (or of property)
NEWS
February 7, 1995 | For The Inquirer / MICHAEL PLUNKETT
Thirty students from Cherry Hill schools got a taste of government yesterday at the municipal building. They met with key city officials.
NEWS
October 15, 1986
I agree on the part of President Reagan's first inaugural address in which he said, "Government is the problem. " His appeal has been as the champion of the individual against big institutions, the promise of liberty against the oppression of government. I state this in response to the Sept. 28 Review & Opinion article by Sidney Blumenthal, "Rehnquist's ideology favors government authority. " Christopher Seese Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 10, 2011 | By E. J. Dionne
Don't expect to see a lot of newspapers and websites with this headline: "Big Government Bailout Worked. " But it would be entirely accurate. The actual headlines make the point. "Demand for fuel-efficient cars helps GM to $3.2 billion profit," declared the Washington Post. "GM Reports Earnings Tripled in First Quarter, as Revenue Jumped 15 Percent," reported the New York Times. Far too little attention has been paid to the success of the government's rescue of the Detroit-based auto companies, and almost no attention has been paid to how utterly wrong opponents of the bailout were when they insisted it was doomed to failure.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 2, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Hosting the Democratic National Convention was a boost for the city, according to a survey of Philadelphians released Wednesday, but distrust in government remains high. The survey, conducted by the Committee of Seventy, the good-government group, and Temple University's Institute for Survey Research found that 82 percent of respondents thought the convention was a good thing for the city. About one-third said they were more likely to vote because the convention occurred in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Keith Zakarin has a tough argument to make, but that is, after all, what lawyers are paid to do. Zakarin is a partner at Center City's Duane Morris, where he chairs a practice group that represents more than a hundred career schools and colleges and industry groups. The firm is one of a handful nationwide that have made the sector a thriving, profitable practice. Its clients are largely vocational and occupational training programs; they teach a variety of trades and skills from cosmetology to nursing to criminal justice, among many others, with degree programs of up to four years.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Dorothy Mae Gill Leatherberry, 95, of West Philadelphia, a Social Security Administration employee and an active church member, died of heart failure Thursday, Aug. 4, at Lankenau Medical Center. Mrs. Leatherberry was born in Houston, the daughter of Adolphus Gill and Nettie Maxey-Gill. The story goes that Mrs. Leatherberry stepped on a nail as a girl, and her foot became so infected that she could not walk. Doctors had given up, but a bishop in Texas healed her, setting in motion Mrs. Leatherberry's early acceptance of Christianity, her family said.
NEWS
August 11, 2016
ISSUE | ABORTION Support all choices A commentary, "Rather than fund abortion, let's invest in alternatives" (Sunday), presented a false choice. We don't need to choose between respecting and supporting a woman who has decided to end her pregnancy and respecting and supporting a woman who has decided to continue her pregnancy. We can and should do both. However we feel about abortion, we can agree that politicians shouldn't force a woman to make a certain decision or stand in the way of what she decides is best for herself and her family.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2016 | By Jordan Rau, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
The federal government released its first overall hospital quality ratings on Wednesday, slapping average or below-average scores on many of the nation's best-known hospitals while awarding top scores to many unheralded ones. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services rated 3,617 hospitals on a one- to five-star scale, angering the hospital industry, which has been pressing the Obama administration and Congress to block the ratings. Hospitals argue the ratings will make places that treat the toughest cases look bad, but Medicare has held firm, saying that consumers need a simple way to objectively gauge quality.
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, Staff Writer
Toby Ziegler, White House communications director on The West Wing , was one of the most earnest characters in television (especially for a political animal). With a solemn and subtle severity, Toby fought for decency in democracy. If Sam Seaborn was the looker, and Josh Lyman the charisma of the operation, Toby was the Bartlet administration's moral compass. "He was much smarter than I am, although I am much better looking," joked actor Richard Schiff, who brought Toby to life on screen.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
The New Jersey Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case brought by an open-government activist who contends that the public should be allowed to view electronic data and metadata kept by local government agencies. In summer 2013, John Paff requested a log of the emails sent by the Galloway Township police chief and the township clerk during a two-week period in June 2013, and then sued in an Ocean County court when his request was denied. A judge in 2014 ordered that the information be released to Paff, the chairman of the New Jersey Libertarian Party's Open Government Advocacy Project.
NEWS
July 15, 2016
The Ghostbusters may not be afraid a no ghosts, but China is. The 1.36 billion people living in the world's No. 2 movie market, won't be able to see the new Ghostbusters movie, except as a bootleg, because the movie has been denied a theatrical release. (They never got to see the original Ghostbusters either.) According to The Hollywood Reporter, China's official censorship guidelines prohibit movies that "promote cults or superstition," going back to the days when the only allowable spirit was Chairman Mao 's. Disney's mega-hit Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest never opened in 2006, thanks to its ghouls.
NEWS
July 6, 2016
By Antony Davies and James R. Harrigan 'Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. " Thomas Jefferson penned these words 240 years ago in the Declaration of Independence to justify something that was nearly unprecedented in human history: replacing a monarch with a government chosen by the people. And the only thing that could justify this, or any government, was the consent of the governed. Consent is about constitutions, and the consent of the governed strikes at the very heart of the government itself - its structure and processes, and what powers the people allow it to have.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Steve Bohnel, Staff Writer
IN WILLIAM J. O'BRIEN'S eyes, the U.S. government and members of the FBI are a bunch of "liars" and "bullies" who have charged him with drug-related offenses for no legitimate reason. But to Assistant U.S. Attorney Mary Beth Leahy and her colleagues, O'Brien is a doctor who conspired with the Pagans Motorcycle Club to deal drugs, trade pills for oral sex, and write multiple prescriptions without any type of medical standard or diagnosis. These were the main points in closing arguments in a trial in which O'Brien, who has acted as his own attorney, is accused of 14 counts of drug and related charges, stemming from a "pill mill" he allegedly ran with the motorcycle club.
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