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NEWS
February 28, 1992
SKEPTIC ABOARD A bumper sticker was spotted on a pickup in Phoenix, "I Don't Believe the Liberal Media. " The truck was in the far right lane of the freeway. - Peter Corbett, Phoenix Gazette. SURFACE FEEDERS An American submarine collided the other day with a Russian submarine in the Barents Sea. Apparently both crews heard that somebody was offering jobs on the surface.- Mike Stedham, Anniston (Ala.) Star BRICK IN THE WALL The reunified Germany won 27 medals at the Winter Olympics.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
Kathryn Wasserman Davis, 106, a globe-trotting philanthropist who provided the start-up funds that her husband, Shelby Cullom Davis, used to become one of America's most successful investors, has died. She died Tuesday at her home in Hobe Sound, Fla., her family said. No cause was given. Ms. Davis' father, Joseph Wasserman, was the longtime chairman of the Artloom Corp. of Philadelphia, a maker of Wilton rugs. His fortune survived the market crash of 1929 because he was "part of a canny minority who kept their money in government bonds," John Rothchild wrote in his 2003 book, The Davis Dynasty: Fifty Years of Successful Investing on Wall Street.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2012 | By David McHugh, Associated Press
FRANKFURT, Germany - Debate raged on among Europe's top bankers Monday over the merits of a proposed plan for the European Central Bank to buy government bonds to lower borrowing costs for financially troubled governments. Germany's national central bank, the Bundesbank, is increasingly isolated in its opposition to the plan, saying it would expose taxpayers to risks and could leave countries dependent on the financial relief as though on a drug. Bundesbank head Jens Weidmann says bond purchases would also be too close to an outright bailout of governments, which the ECB is forbidden from doing by treaty.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2013 | By David McHugh, Associated Press
FRANKFURT, Germany - This week's deal to rescue Cyprus and its banks from financial collapse has renewed fears about Europe's shaky financial system and where trouble might next appear. Many banks have been struggling for more than three years as losses on government bonds and bad loans pile up. Some governments, meanwhile, have taken on more debt trying to prop up their banks, to the point where they needed bailouts themselves. In Cyprus' case, the banking sector became bigger than the government could afford to rescue, seven times the size of the economy.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By David McHugh, Associated Press
FRANKFURT, Germany - The European Central Bank unveiled its most ambitious plan yet to ease Europe's financial crisis with a pledge to buy unlimited amounts of government bonds to help lower borrowing costs for countries struggling to manage their debts. Large-scale purchases of short-term government bonds would drive up their price and push down their interest rate, or yield, taking some pressure off financially stressed governments such as Spain and Italy. "We will have a fully effective backstop to avoid destructive scenarios," bank president Mario Draghi said at a news conference, at which he also defended the euro currency union as "irreversible.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2012 | From Inquirer Wire Services
European Central Bank President Mario Draghi gets his chance Thursday to spell out how the bank intends to rescue the 17 countries that use the euro from financial disaster. Draghi's bond-buying proposal, outlined to Bloomberg News by officials briefed on the plan, involves unlimited purchases of government debt that will be "sterilized" to assuage concerns about the central bank "printing money. " Expectations have been high since late July, when the ECB head vowed to do "whatever it takes" to hold the eurozone together.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2012 | By Karin Matussek, Bloomberg News
Germany's top constitutional court Wednesday rejected efforts to block a permanent eurozone rescue fund, handing a victory to Chancellor Angela Merkel, who championed the bailout facility. The Federal Constitutional Court in Karlsruhe dismissed motions that sought to block the European Stability Mechanism, while ruling that Germany's $240 billion contribution cannot be increased without legislative approval. The court said Germany can ratify the ESM if it includes binding caveats that it won't be forced to assume higher liabilities without its consent.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2012 | By David McHugh, Associated Press
FRANKFURT, Germany - Europe's debt crisis flared on Monday as fears intensified that Spain would be next in line for a government bailout. A recession is deepening in Spain, the fourth-largest economy that uses the euro currency, and a growing number of its regional governments are seeking aid to make ends meet. The interest rate on Spanish government bonds soared in a sign of waning market confidence in the country's ability to pay its debts. The prospect of bailing out Spain worries Europe because the potential cost far exceeds emergency funds.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2012
"This weak jobs report is going to feed into [the Fed's] argument that the economy is growing at a subpar pace. " - John Silvia, chief economist at Wells Fargo, on Friday's unemployment numbers. "Let me repeat what I said last month: We act strictly within our mandate to maintain price stability over the medium terms; we act independently in determining monetary policy; and the euro is irreversible. " - European Central Bank president Mario Draghi, introducing a widely heralded plan for the bank to buy European government bonds in an attempt to lower those nations' borrowing costs in the ongoing financial crisis.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
European Central Bank chief Mario Draghi vowed Thursday that the euro common currency is "irreversible," but the bank's decision not to ease borrowing costs for heavily indebted eurozone members such as Spain and Italy drove markets into renewed turmoil. Draghi had raised expectations that the central bank would act to reassure investors that the euro is a safe bet when he said last week that his institution would "do whatever it takes" to protect the euro from bond market speculation.
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BUSINESS
July 22, 2013 | By Stan Choe, Associated Press
Investing in bond mutual funds is easy. At least, it was for decades. Investors could count on steady interest payments. Their funds also benefited from rising bond prices as interest rates made a three-decade-long march downward after 1981. When yields fell, bond prices rose: Each step lower made the bonds held by mutual funds more attractive because they offered higher rates than newly issued bonds. But the tide has shifted. Many analysts say we have hit a bottom for interest rates, and the yield on the 10-year Treasury note has climbed to 2.5 percent from 1.6 percent at the start of May. The rise in rates has led to losses for many bond mutual funds, and it's something investors need to get used to, says Rick Rieder, chief investment officer of fundamental fixed-income portfolios at BlackRock, the world's largest asset manager.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Ahead of the key Federal Reserve meetings Tuesday and Wednesday, bond investors are asking themselves a hard question: What will happen when inflation and interest rates inevitably rise and bond prices fall? The Fed, to a large extent, has kept interest rates at rock-bottom levels, so bond investors are holding their collective breath to see what the agency decides next. If rates rise, the market value of government bonds in particular - and all bonds in general - could be hurt significantly.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
Kathryn Wasserman Davis, 106, a globe-trotting philanthropist who provided the start-up funds that her husband, Shelby Cullom Davis, used to become one of America's most successful investors, has died. She died Tuesday at her home in Hobe Sound, Fla., her family said. No cause was given. Ms. Davis' father, Joseph Wasserman, was the longtime chairman of the Artloom Corp. of Philadelphia, a maker of Wilton rugs. His fortune survived the market crash of 1929 because he was "part of a canny minority who kept their money in government bonds," John Rothchild wrote in his 2003 book, The Davis Dynasty: Fifty Years of Successful Investing on Wall Street.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2013 | By David McHugh, Associated Press
FRANKFURT, Germany - This week's deal to rescue Cyprus and its banks from financial collapse has renewed fears about Europe's shaky financial system and where trouble might next appear. Many banks have been struggling for more than three years as losses on government bonds and bad loans pile up. Some governments, meanwhile, have taken on more debt trying to prop up their banks, to the point where they needed bailouts themselves. In Cyprus' case, the banking sector became bigger than the government could afford to rescue, seven times the size of the economy.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2013 | Steve Rothwell, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Stocks were flat on Wall Street as the latest round of earnings reports failed to give investors an impetus to push the market's recent rally forward. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 7.22 points to 13,986.52 on Wednesday, after trading slightly lower for most of the day. The Standard & Poor's 500 rose 0.83 point to 1,512.12. The Nasdaq composite was 3.10 points lower at 3,168.48. Time Warner rose $2.05, or 4.1 percent, to $52.01 after the company said its net income grew 51 percent in the last three months of 2012 even as revenue was largely unchanged.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Earlier this month, we spoke with investors who are avoiding long-term U.S. Treasury bonds. Now we have come across one fund manager who is actually shorting Treasuries - basically, betting they will fall in price - and taking advantage of what he terms is the coming "bear market in government. " Michael Aronstein is president and portfolio manager of the Marketfield Fund (MFADX), a $4.4 billion mutual fund that returned just over 13 percent in 2012 and 8 percent annually since inception in 2008.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2013 | By Matthew Craft, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A two-day rally in the stock market came to an end Thursday when an account of the Federal Reserve's last meeting revealed a split among bank officials over how long the Fed should keep buying bonds to support the economy. The Dow Jones industrial average and the Standard & Poor's 500 index treaded water much of the day, then slid into the red about 2 p.m., after the Fed released the minutes from its December meeting. The Dow ended with a loss of 21.19 points, at 13,391.36.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2012 | By Steve Rothwell, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Investors drew little hope Wednesday for a quick compromise in U.S. budget talks after President Obama insisted that higher taxes on wealthy Americans would have to be part of any deal. Stocks fell sharply, and even a signal from the Federal Reserve that it could launch a program in December to speed job growth failed to encourage investors. The Dow Jones industrial average dropped 185 points. Obama made clear he would seek higher tax revenue from the wealthiest Americans, an idea that faces Republican opposition in Congress.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2012 | Associated Press
BRUSSELS - European leaders took a step toward creating a single supervisor for banks in countries that use the euro on Friday but refused to pin down a start date. Although the leaders meeting in Brussels said their decisions on the watchdog , the single supervisory mechanism , were key to shoring up lenders and eventually giving them access to loans from Europe's bailout fund, many observers were struggling to figure out exactly what had been achieved. Rather than finding new measures to fight the crisis, the leaders focused on establishing a timeline for those they had already agreed to. "It is good for Europe that we'll have a single supervisory mechanism up and running in the course of 2013," Herman Van Rompuy, president of the European Council, which includes the leaders of all 27 EU countries, said Friday.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Elena Becatoros, Associated Press
ATHENS, Greece - Europe's fragile financial calm was shattered Wednesday as investors worried that violent anti-austerity protests in Greece and Spain's debt troubles showed that the continent still cannot contain its financial crisis. Police fired tear gas Wednesday at rioters hurling gasoline bombs and chunks of marble during Greece's largest anti-austerity demonstration in six months. The protests were part of a 24-hour general strike, the latest test for Greece's nearly four-month-old coalition government and the new spending cuts it plans to push through.
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