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NEWS
June 14, 1993 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What Dmitri Berkov did in February would have been practically unthinkable only a few years ago. He resigned from the Russian Foreign Ministry. He left what was once one of the best paid, most prestigious careers in the former Soviet Union. Almost nobody left the Foreign Ministry, and almost everyone who was qualified wanted to work there. But now that capitalism has come to Russia, the government no longer pays enough to compete with new opportunities offered by private business, and the Foreign Ministry has lost much of its glamour.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1995 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The government panel that is deciding what to do with the nation's military bases yesterday gave to Philadelphia - and it took away. The city gained 281 Navy engineering and technical jobs that will aid the city's efforts to convert the soon-to-close Philadelphia Naval Base into a research and development and industrial center. On the other hand, 300 jobs at two Northeast Philadelphia facilities were tranferred to California. The federal Base Realignment and Closure Commission recommended transfer of the 281 jobs from Annapolis, Md., to the 1,600-person Naval Ship Systems Engineering Station (NAVSS)
NEWS
August 11, 1998 | By Eric Dyer and Scott Fallon, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS Inquirer correspondent Melody McDonald contributed to this article
The mood today in Gloucester County is decidedly against back-scratching in government - especially if the back belongs to a family member. Bowing to pressure from the Board of Freeholders, most of the county's 16 autonomous boards and agencies - from the Utilities Authority to the Housing Authority - this year have established policies banning nepotism. The drive to stamp out family favoritism has spilled over to the municipal level. In the last month, two local councils have approved guidelines that prohibit elected officials from giving government jobs to relatives, though one of those policies was vetoed by the town's mayor.
NEWS
March 17, 1995 | By Glen Justice, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
County officials in the Philadelphia suburbs are considering a new approach to government service: Let somebody else do it. It's not that they're wiggling out of their responsibilities. Rather, many are looking to private companies to perform tasks once done in-house - replacing government, rather than reinventing it. "Competition rears its head all over the place when costs get excessive," said John Shannon, a consultant at the Urban Institute in Washington. "The two organizations most ripe are big cities and suburban jurisdictions.
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert Vagnozzi long dreamed of following in his father's footsteps: He wanted to be a police officer. A trainee on the Upper Merion Township police force, Vagnozzi, 24, scored high enough on the police test to be considered the leading candidate the night in February when the Township Board of Supervisors voted to hire a new officer. To his disappointment, the board voted, 3-2, to hire someone else. Albert Vagnozzi, it seems, lost the job because of politics - his father's politics.
NEWS
December 2, 1997 | by Paul Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia had a net gain of 1,800 jobs in the 12 months ending in October, according to state figures released today. The largest gain came in the service sector, which grew by 3,500 jobs between October 1996 and the same month this year, said the Department of Labor and Industry. The biggest loss was in government jobs, which dropped by 1,900. More than half of the government jobs were in the federal sector, while the number of state government jobs dropped by 700 and city government jobs dropped by 100, the figures show.
NEWS
June 29, 1996 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Hurling a constitutional gavel at the centuries-old political spoils system, the Supreme Court ruled yesterday that the Constitution protects contractors from losing government business because of their political views or party loyalties. Dividing 7-2 in two cases of political dissent, the justices allowed a Kansas trash hauler and an Illinois tow-truck operator to sue local governments alleged to have retaliated against them for political reasons. People who do business with government, like public employees, are protected by First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and association, the court majority concluded in rulings that dissenters Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas called "profoundly disturbing.
NEWS
August 31, 2010 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Nutter on Tuesday named Rebecca Rhynhart the city's new budget director. He also appointed Maari Porter as Philadelphia's recovery officer, which puts her in charge of spending stimulus dollars. Both women already work for the city, Rhynhart as treasurer and Porter as deputy budget director for recovery efforts. They replace Steve Agostini, who did both jobs but left the administration last week to become chief financial officer at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management in Washington.
NEWS
June 12, 2003
SO . . . WILLARD ROUSE'S death did not merit Page 1, but mobster Ralph Natalie's mistress did. That sound you hear is Western civilization crashing down around us. Tom O'Neill, Philadelphia 'Jewish' remark, cont'd. Two thoughts regarding the Hanford Jones "Jewish" remark: Why is it that when you scratch so many blacks, "Jew" pops out of their mouths? If there are so many Jewish architects (or doctors, lawyers, accountants, etc.), it's because Jews earn the degrees.
NEWS
October 23, 1987 | By Thomas Turcol and S.A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writers
Two years ago, when Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority Executive Director Herman Engelbert was looking for the utility's new special counsel for land acquisition, he turned to an old friend. Engelbert, who is also chairman of the Gloucester Township Democratic Committee, selected a Democrat - David Carlamere, a Gloucester Township councilman who is a Democratic candidate for county freeholder in the Nov. 3 election. Since then, Carlamere has earned $43,596 in fees in a no-bid professional services contract as the CCMUA's representative in land disputes with homeowners, acquiring space for the utility's sewer pipes.
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NEWS
July 29, 2014 | BY ANN McFEATTERS
WASHINGTON - When historians look back on 2014, they will note not just how flagrantly Vladimir Putin disregarded international law or how stubbornly Gaza and Israel kept firing missiles at each other. They also will be puzzled at how poorly the United States handled its economy. They undoubtedly will conclude that 2014 was a year of missed opportunities. The world's record in dealing with bullies and tyrants has not been good; it remains to be seen if economic sanctions work with the lawless Putin, whose takeover of Crimea has led to a series of disasters for scores of innocent people.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
YOUR SOCIAL Security check will still be in the mailbox this afternoon - but just don't try to log into the Library of Congress website, or go for a hike in a national park. The long-predicted shutdown of the federal government came at midnight as Washington's never-ending spat over the Affordable Care Act - a/k/a ObamaCare - prevented Congress from passing a budget bill that both houses could agree on and that President Obama would sign. The result is a bizarre mix of what's open, and what's not, of which government employees get paid, and which don't.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey public employees are bracing for what their union leaders say is the latest anti-worker onslaught by the Christie administration. The New Jersey Civil Service Commission, all of whose members are Gov. Christie's appointees, has proposed sweeping changes it says would streamline the promotion process, making it easier to advance top-notch people. That's not how the unions see it. They say the changes would invite cronyism and political favoritism, discouraging state, county, and municipal workers who don't want to play politics.
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | By Vivian Sequera and Michael Weissenstein, Associated Press
TACARIGUA, Venezuela - The razor-close vote to replace late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez has sparked what opposition leaders and human-rights groups say is a government crackdown on public employees who either didn't back Chavez's handpicked successor or failed to show sufficient support for the ruling party. The April 14 election had revealed a major shift in public support away from the Chavez program as problems such as food shortages, soaring inflation and crime, as well as the absence of the late leader's famous charm, led hundreds of thousands of Venezuelans to back the opposition for the first time since Chavez took power 14 years ago. It was an ominous start for successor Nicolas Maduro's government, which is struggling to write the second chapter of the country's socialist transformation amid deepening economic problems and widening divisions in a bureaucracy and public that once solidly backed Chavez.
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wall Street liked what it heard from Washington, as the stock market responded positively to an upbeat jobs report Friday from the U.S. Labor Department. February's unemployment rate edged down to 7.7 percent from 7.9 percent, while payroll jobs grew by 236,000, with broad hiring in nearly every sector. The report sent the Dow Jones industrial average up 67 points, and the S&P gained nearly seven points. "The number was up more than expected," said PNC Financial Services chief economist Kurt Rankin.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The nation's payrolls added 236,000 jobs in February, and the unemployment rate dropped to 7.7 percent, down from 7.9 percent, the U.S. Labor Department reported Friday morning. Stocks rose as the news was released. Except for 10,000 government jobs lost, there was hiring in nearly every broad industry sector, including manufacturing, construction, retail, business and professional services and health. Education, typically a job generator, saw a decline, both in the private and public sectors.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | By Sam Hananel, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Union membership plummeted last year to the lowest level since the 1930s as cash-strapped state and local governments shed workers and unions had difficulty organizing new members in the private sector despite signs of an improving economy. Government figures released Wednesday showed union membership declined from 11.8 percent to 11.3 percent of the workforce, another blow to a labor movement already stretched thin by battles in Wisconsin, Indiana, Michigan, and other states to curb bargaining rights and weaken union clout.
NEWS
December 26, 2012
IN HIS STORY ON unemployment in Pennsylvania ( Daily News , Dec. 21), Will Bunch reveals a fundamental lack of understanding when it comes to free-market economies. Recovering from a recession is best accomplished by growing private-sector employment - something the Corbett administration has done to the tune of 109,000 new jobs. These are the jobs that spur economic recovery, support other sectors through spending and investment and provide revenue for government services. Government jobs, on the other hand, consume public dollars, and the taxes public employees pay return only a fraction of money to the same treasury from which their salaries came.
NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The bell kept ringing at the Be a Hero, Hire a Hero job fair for veterans at the National Constitution Center on Friday - each ring signaling a tentative job offer or a second interview. Maybe it's a reflection of Friday's news from the U.S. Labor Department that the nation's payrolls expanded by 146,000 jobs in November or that the unemployment rate dropped to an unanticipated low of 7.7 percent - a five-year low. Or maybe it's just another confusing signal in a confusing job market.
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