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NEWS
July 7, 2010 | By Maya Rao, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
TRENTON - To impose a 2 percent cap on property-tax increases without addressing what drives up government spending is "the tail wagging the dog," Cherry Hill Mayor Bernie Platt told an Assembly panel on Wednesday. Collingswood Mayor Jim Maley concurred, warning lawmakers, "The order we're doing this in is not the best way. " The Assembly Budget Committee heard testimony from representatives of towns, schools, and public employees who repeatedly questioned the effectiveness of the 2 percent cap agreement reached Saturday by Gov. Christie and legislative leaders.
NEWS
January 31, 2001 | By Matthew Miller
Let me say this first so there can be no misunderstanding: Alan Greenspan has been wrongly bashed by liberals for years when, in fact, the Fed chairman has used his impeccable anti-inflation credentials to preside over an extended economic experiment that has pushed unemployment down to 4 percent, far lower than what economists had previously thought possible without igniting a price spiral. Almost single-handedly, in other words, Greenspan's shrewd monetary management has drawn several million less-skilled workers into the labor force, thereby helping them more than any government program could have.
NEWS
January 16, 1994 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Want to send an anti-tax message to elected representatives from Main Street to Pennsylvania Avenue? Look no further than Malcolm X and Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neill. So says Sean Duffy, president of the Pennsylvania Leadership Council, a Harrisburg-based group promoting greater accountability in government. Unlikely bedfellows, yes, but the two men's approach to politics was remarkably similar, said Duffy, addressing a roomful of angry taxpayers yesterday at a regional spending cuts conference.
NEWS
August 17, 1992 | Daily News wire services
RIYADH MONEY TROUBLES PLAGUE SAUDIS Saudi Arabia, already paying out billions of dollars on foreign and domestic debt, may have problems meeting its obligations within a few years, due to the cost of the Gulf War, economists say. By the end of the year the oil-rich kingdom will have about $60 billion worth of outstanding debt, mainly in the form of treasury bills and bonds. It is expected to spend $5 billion to $8 billion this year alone on interest and principal. Economists say that will more than double by the mid-1990s if the Saudis do not curb government spending.
NEWS
May 26, 2011 | By Martin Crutsinger, ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - High gasoline prices, government budget cuts and weaker-than-expected consumer spending caused the economy to grow only weakly in the first three months of the year. The Commerce Department estimated Thursday that the economy grew at an annual rate of 1.8 percent in the January-March quarter. That was the same as its first estimate a month ago. Consumer spending grew at just half the rate of the previous quarter. And a surge in imports widened the U.S. trade deficit.
NEWS
October 26, 2001
Virtually everyone agrees something must be done to kick-start the economy. How we do this, though, is crucial. Do we respond to the terrorist attacks by building commuter rail systems? Or do we spend what we must to repair the damage, help the victims, strengthen counterterrorism and the military - and spend what we can on permanent, substantial tax cuts to stimulate the economy? You only need to know a little history to know that tax cuts - not more government spending - are the way to go. Yes, we need more spending - but by taxpayers, not by government.
NEWS
February 4, 2003 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The federal budget typically contains answers to a number of questions about government spending, economic assumptions and the federal deficit. President Bush's poses this question: "Where Are the Real Space Aliens?" The five-volume fiscal 2004 budget that Bush sent Congress yesterday is sprinkled with odd musings about government spending that go well beyond the usual facts and figures. The section on NASA does not reveal where the space aliens are, but it concludes: "Perhaps the notion that 'there's something out there' is closer to reality than we have imagined.
NEWS
November 21, 1987 | Inquirer Washington Bureau
The automatic spending cuts triggered by President Reagan's activation of Gramm-Rudman yesterday could affect millions of Americans and many - but not all - aspects of federal government spending. Most notably, the automatic $23 million in spending cuts would not reduce Social Security benefits. Medicaid payments also are unchanged by the Gramm- Rudman-Hollings budget law. In fact, the $23 billion in purportedly across-the-board cuts are concentrated in about 21 percent of government spending with many programs for the poor and elderly specifically shielded from the law's harsh cutback provisions.
NEWS
November 10, 2010
NEW JERSEY Gov. Chris Christie has been on a fast track to sainthood for his tough, take-no-prisoners stance on the New Jersey budget. He has not only been unafraid to call for tough budget cuts, but is rarely shy about expressing his opinion. For that, he and swooning Republicans have started to whisper the "P" word in connection with Christie's political future. His halo has slipped a little following a recent report from the Department of Justice's inspector general on the travel expenses of U.S. attorneys.
NEWS
July 19, 2010
By Frank R. Gunter Has President Obama's economic stimulus actually led to a deeper recession and higher unemployment? In 1981, the United Kingdom was in a severe recession, and most economists supported a stimulus program of increased government spending and reduced taxes. They predicted this would stimulate private consumption and investment, shortening the recession. However, Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's senior economic adviser, Alan Walters, advised her not to stimulate the economy in this manner, but rather to adopt a contractionary fiscal policy by raising taxes.
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NEWS
November 12, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman and Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writers
Gov. Christie on Tuesday sought to make the case that he was the best choice in the GOP presidential field to defeat Hillary Rodham Clinton, while he also swatted back attacks that he was a "big government Republican" who wouldn't rein in spending. Appearing in the so-called undercard debate, the New Jersey governor all but ignored an onslaught of criticism leveled by Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, instead deciding to answer almost every question with warnings about a potential Clinton presidency.
NEWS
April 24, 2015
THE WASHINGTON Post yesterday offered two items - one on trust in government and one on how much lobbyists spend - that just might be connected. The first item comes from a Pew Research Center study showing just 23 percent of Americans trust the federal government to do the right thing "at least most of the time. " The second item compares government spending on congressional staff to private-sector spending on lobbying Congress. The latter is greater than the former.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - U.S. Rep. Jim Gerlach of Chester County became the latest local Republican to break with House conservatives Wednesday, calling for a "clean" spending bill to reopen the federal government. Gerlach, who accompanied his statement with eye-opening statistics about the tenor of messages from his constituents, is the fifth Republican from the moderate Philadelphia suburbs to part ways with the GOP's House leadership in the ongoing fight over government spending and President Obama's sweeping health-care law. "It is time for Congress to vote on a budget bill that gets the government back to work providing all of the services already paid for by the hardworking taxpayers in my district and across the country," Gerlach's statement said.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The first, and likely only, debate in the Republican Senate primary produced few substantive distinctions between the two candidates and even fewer fireworks. Steve Lonegan and Alieta Eck staked out similar positions, calling for a less intrusive government, less spending, and a repeal of President Obama's health-care law. Each supported tougher border security, questioned the size of the $50 billion aid package passed after Hurricane Sandy, and praised the tea party as a positive force against government overreach.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2013 | By Martin Crutsinger, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The U.S. economy grew at a modest 2.4 percent annual rate from January through March, slightly slower than initially estimated. Consumer spending was stronger than first thought, but businesses restocked more slowly, and state and local government spending cuts were deeper. The Commerce Department said Thursday that economic growth in the first quarter was only marginally below the 2.5 percent annual rate the government estimated last month. That's still much faster than the 0.4 percent growth during the October-December quarter.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2013 | By Christopher S. Rugaber, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Americans are more optimistic that the job market is healing and will deliver higher pay later this year. That brighter outlook, along with rising home prices, cheaper gasoline, and a surging stock market, could offset some of the drag from the recent tax increases and government spending cuts. A gauge of consumer confidence rose in April, reversing a decline in March, the Conference Board, a private research group, said Tuesday. The board attributed the gain to optimism about hiring and pay increases.
NEWS
April 17, 2013
By Antony Davies and James R. Harrigan Each July Fourth, Americans celebrate their freedom, the result of a revolution over "taxation without representation. " This month, we celebrate another type of freedom - from our own tax man. It turns out that taxation with representation is no picnic either. According to the Tax Foundation, Tax Freedom Day - the day on which the average American has earned enough money to pay off his federal, state, and local tax bills for the year - occurs on Thursday.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Will Weissert, Associated Press
FORT HOOD, Texas - Public schools everywhere will be affected by the government's automatic budget cuts, but few may feel the funding pinch faster than those on and around military bases. School districts with military ties from coast to coast are bracing for increased class sizes and delayed building repairs. Others already have axed sports teams and even eliminated teaching positions, but still may have to tap savings just to make it through year's end. But there's little hope for softening any future financial blows.
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The federal government and the vast majority of states, including New Jersey and Pennsylvania, inadequately fund tobacco-use prevention programs, according to a leading health advocacy group. In its annual State of Tobacco Control report, to be released Wednesday morning, the American Lung Association gave the Garden and Keystone States failing grades for programs to protect citizens from tobacco-related diseases. New Jersey receives an annual $997 million and Pennsylvania $1.4 billion in tobacco-related revenue.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
With the budget behind them, Mayor Nutter and City Council have a rare opportunity to craft sweeping tax and government spending reforms.   Though Council wisely postponed a new property tax system based on the actual value of properties until the numbers are in, members cannot waver from their commitment to the Actual Value Initiative (AVI), the most extensive tax reform in decades. An ambitious restructuring of taxation as well as government spending is not as difficult as it may seem.
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