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NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By Lisa Schwartz, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Voorhees voters may be asked if they want to scrap the township's 93-year- old form of government. Spurred by interest in making government more accountable to residents, the Township Committee has begun a process that could bring a change from the committee to one of three other types of government: mayor-council, council- manager or mayor-council-manager. The Township Committee is considering an ordinance to place a question on the November ballot. The question would ask voters if they want to elect a commission to study the township's form of government.
NEWS
February 5, 1988 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Bureaucrat-bashing and anti-government rhetoric, staples of presidential campaigns for two decades, are out of style. Political advisers have told candidates that those messages no longer work, and both the Republicans and the Democrats are taking the advice. In contrast to Ronald Reagan's rallying cry of "get the government off our backs," Bob Dole says: "The government is here to stay. " Unlike George Wallace's mocking references to "pointy-headed bureaucrats," George Bush proclaims that government workers are "some of the best people in the world.
NEWS
September 28, 1986
In answer to the Sept. 22 letter about seat belts and the government entering our lives: Does the writer buy uninspected meat for his table? Use untreated water in his home? If he drinks milk, does he look for unpasteurized milk? And if he is ill, does he insist on medicine that has not been tested? All of the above represent the government entering our lives - but for our own safety, just like seat belts. Betty Layton Bala Cynwyd.
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Michael Crane's letter of Dec. 21 asks "Can someone, anyone . . . please show me where in the Constitution does it say that the president has the authority to do whatever he wants regardless of the law?" Let's look inward. This is a federal government that has gone far beyond the scope of power envisioned by our Founding Fathers. Madison, Jefferson and the rest would not recognize the nanny state that exists today as the nation of liberty and freedom from government intrusion they left us. Income taxes, Social Security, Medicare, corporate welfare gone mad, and literally thousands of other unconstitutional programs would make this nation unrecognizable to our founders.
NEWS
September 8, 1988 | By Richard Reeves
The principal issue in the 1988 presidential campaign is not competence or character or who knows all the words of "The Star-Spangled Banner" and the Pledge of Allegiance. This campaign and most of the politics that divided Republicans and Democrats during the 1980s is a debate about the role of government in the United States. "Government is not the solution; government is the problem," said Ronald Reagan, kicking off the decade. Democrats, astonished that anyone would believe such a thing, stuck stubbornly to their belief that government was America's great friend in need.
NEWS
January 4, 2001
Convinced the big, bad federal government can't do anything right? Well, take a look at a new list of its biggest achievements in the last half century. Not too shabby for government work. Topping the list: reviving postwar Europe; outlawing discrimination; reducing disease, and ensuring safe food and drinking water. Senior citizens benefited from a couple of the top successes: better financial security and health-care access. If you just shrug and figure that those stumblebums in Washington had to get a couple of things right, understand that this new list has 50 - count 'em, 50 - achievements.
NEWS
April 29, 1997 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an era in which government is suspect and its role uncertain, at least one participant of the Presidents' Summit yesterday demanded assertive government action in no uncertain terms. "The bottom line," Charles King, an AIDS activist from New York City, thundered to an afternoon audience, "is that if each of you walks out of here today with an individual commitment to help a child at risk, but no commitment to collectively, aggressively, and even militantly working to change and transform the political will . . . then the goals set here at this summit will be in vain.
NEWS
May 3, 1992 | By Lem Lloyd, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
West Chester voters have approved formation of a citizens' commission to study the borough's form of government and possibly recommend changes that could include a home rule charter. Seven borough residents were elected to the commission, which will now have about 18 months to evaluate West Chester's government. A home rule charter would provide greater flexibility when it comes to taxes, among other things. Currently, the borough, which is at its legal taxing limit for general purposes, is prohibited by the state from levying more than a 1 percent tax on a resident's earned income.
NEWS
July 23, 1986 | By Marybeth Farrell, Special to The Inquirer
Several residents of Audubon are expected to begin circulating petitions today in an effort to change the borough's form of government to a six-member council with a mayor who would be directly elected by the voters. The Camden County borough of 9,800 residents is now governed by a three- member Board of Commissioners. The commissioners are elected for four-year terms in elections held in May, rather than November. The mayor is chosen from among the commissioners. Five residents began the move to change Audubon's form of government several months ago. They said that the borough's current system did not provide adequate representation on major issues, and that they believed the borough needed a mayor who would be elected by the residents and who would have greater accountability to them.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | By Cheryl Baisden, Special to The Inquirer
It was exactly 100 years ago that Collingswood's original residents established their own form of government, a three-person commission authorized to appoint one of its own as mayor. According to Mayor Michael Brennan, who has served 15 years as the borough's leader, the political system has always worked well, offering the community's estimated 16,000 residents proper representation. But in the last week, Brennan and his two fellow commissioners have discovered that at least 1,690 voters may have a gripe with the government.
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