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NEWS
November 16, 2006
RE LETTER-WRITER Dennis Deangelis' comments on the election: It's sad when people are so gung-ho about dumb stuff. This dude wants to say that we are weaker as a country because the Repubs lost the Senate and House in the election to the anti-war Dems. He goes on about another terrorist attack, some stuff about the First Amendment-violating Patriot Act, and then he tops it off with some more stuff about Santorum. I'm not talking as if I believe that the Dems can do a better job because I, unlike some of these writers, actually HAVE common sense to know that the government is a business!
NEWS
October 19, 1988 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
The Cinnaminson mayor last week wore a gold hoop earring in his left ear, a shiny gray sports jacket with black stripes and size 9 1/2 brown loafers. Indeed, all the township committee members and officials had surprisingly small feet at the meeting last Wednesday, but they were trying their best to make up the difference and fill their shoes. In the minds of those residents who regularly attend committee meetings, the Cinnaminson governing body last week seemed a little less staid, a little less dyed-in-the-wool Republican than it had appeared at previous meetings.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By John Dickerson
It must get confusing in the IT department at the Associated Press: Are you talking about the hackers who hacked our Twitter account or the Justice Department hackers who hacked our phones? Monday, the Associated Press reported that the Justice Department had secretly obtained two months of records of phone conversations by its reporters. Meanwhile, the Washington Post revealed that the IRS's targeting of conservative groups was more widespread than first reported. Someone at the IRS also leaked information about conservative groups to ProPublica.
NEWS
January 8, 2003 | By Steven Thomma INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The federal government - epitomized by a 1950s-style bureaucracy designed for clerks using typewriters - is inadequate to serve and safeguard the country and should be reconstructed, a bipartisan commission said yesterday. Among its recommendations: Cut the number of federal departments and the number of political appointees running them, raise pay for senior career civil servants and federal judges, and make it easier for managers to hire and fire. Authors of the report said the one-two punch of terrorist attacks and economic anxiety underscored the need for an agile and effective government to safeguard everything from food supplies to financial markets.
NEWS
July 5, 2014
What better occasion than Independence Day to reflect on a political movement whose adherents insist its essence is embodied in one of the seminal events of this country's birth, the Boston Tea Party? The spirit of protest is what today's tea-party patriots refer to as they liken themselves to those early Americans who, in 1773, hurled an East India Company cargo into Boston Harbor rather than pay a tax levied by the British Parliament with no colonial representation. With names like the Berks Sons of Liberty, Northeast Pennsylvania Spirit of 1776, Defenders of Freedom, and Tea Party Time Network, today's purported scions of the colonial rebels try to incite the passions of Americans who believe government looms too large in their lives.
NEWS
August 20, 1986 | By Marybeth Farrell, Special to The Inquirer
Tonight, residents of Audubon will count signatures as they rally to beat the clock to change the borough's form of government. Nine residents announced last week that 800 residents had signed a petition seeking to change the borough's form of government from a three-member commission that chooses the mayor to a six-member council with a mayor elected by voters. Under state law, signatures from 1,200 of the 5,638 registered voters are needed by Sept. 4 to place a referendum on the November ballot.
NEWS
June 26, 2008 | Paul C. Light
Paul C. Light is a professor at New York University We've seen the federal government at its worst over the past six months. Consider the controversies over contaminated tomatoes and meat, tainted toys, toxic trailers, counterfeit Heparin, aircraft groundings, veterans' care, missing warheads and unrelenting contract fraud. For every NASA success on the surface of Mars, there seems to be a failure back on Earth. Congress and the presidential candidates have yet to connect the dots: The next president will inherit what Alexander Hamilton called a "government ill executed.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | By Eddie Olsen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louis Long was a man of boundless knowledge and impatience with government bureaucracy. So much impatience that he wound up working for the government, serving as inspector general for the Defense Personnel Support Center in Philadelphia from 1974 until 1985, when he retired. "The red tape that he found in the government often angered him and that's maybe one reason he stayed with it so long, to make things better," his daughter, Diana Long, reflected Friday. Mr. Long, a resident of Medford, died Wednesday at Burlington County Memorial Hospital in Medford.
NEWS
January 7, 1999 | by Wade Hudson and Adrian Moore
For three years, the U.S. Postal Service has been a front-runner in a daring government experiment: Running for-profit business enterprises. The bad news, according to a recent report by the General Accounting Office: It has lost $85 million in the process. In all, the Postal Service has launched 19 business operations. The most familiar is the selling of T-shirts, mugs and other items with postage stamp logos. According to the GAO, 15 of these operations have lost money, and the most profitable one, selling logo merchandise, is being phased out. Postal customers have complained about waiting in line behind people shopping for gifts.
NEWS
August 27, 2010
IT JUST SEEMS that the city council and their cronies are corrupt,unchecked, unaccountable and out for money at our expense,cutting programs, firehouses libraries, etc. This may be harsh but, truthfully, people in their mid-50s, 60s, 70s are set in their ways, grounded in what they want, and that does not equal change for anyone else. Nor is it best for the city to have elected leaders in these age brackets calling the shots for us. We need fresh ideas not old people with stale ideas. James R. Brawner 3rd, Philadelphia
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