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NEWS
July 23, 1986 | By Marybeth Farrell, Special to The Inquirer
Several residents of Audubon are expected to begin circulating petitions today in an effort to change the borough's form of government to a six-member council with a mayor who would be directly elected by the voters. The Camden County borough of 9,800 residents is now governed by a three- member Board of Commissioners. The commissioners are elected for four-year terms in elections held in May, rather than November. The mayor is chosen from among the commissioners. Five residents began the move to change Audubon's form of government several months ago. They said that the borough's current system did not provide adequate representation on major issues, and that they believed the borough needed a mayor who would be elected by the residents and who would have greater accountability to them.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | By Cheryl Baisden, Special to The Inquirer
It was exactly 100 years ago that Collingswood's original residents established their own form of government, a three-person commission authorized to appoint one of its own as mayor. According to Mayor Michael Brennan, who has served 15 years as the borough's leader, the political system has always worked well, offering the community's estimated 16,000 residents proper representation. But in the last week, Brennan and his two fellow commissioners have discovered that at least 1,690 voters may have a gripe with the government.
NEWS
July 20, 2007
RE STUART Caesar's recent letter: Mr. Caesar must be unaware of the employment landscape. Health care is hardly a guarantee for most jobs, and even if people have the option, many are forced to make the choice between feeding themselves and paying for their share of health care. It disappoints me that Mr. Caesar uses the tired line that our country was founded on less government involvement. Our country was founded by wealthy people who did not want to spend money on British goods.
NEWS
November 16, 2006
RE LETTER-WRITER Dennis Deangelis' comments on the election: It's sad when people are so gung-ho about dumb stuff. This dude wants to say that we are weaker as a country because the Repubs lost the Senate and House in the election to the anti-war Dems. He goes on about another terrorist attack, some stuff about the First Amendment-violating Patriot Act, and then he tops it off with some more stuff about Santorum. I'm not talking as if I believe that the Dems can do a better job because I, unlike some of these writers, actually HAVE common sense to know that the government is a business!
NEWS
October 19, 1988 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
The Cinnaminson mayor last week wore a gold hoop earring in his left ear, a shiny gray sports jacket with black stripes and size 9 1/2 brown loafers. Indeed, all the township committee members and officials had surprisingly small feet at the meeting last Wednesday, but they were trying their best to make up the difference and fill their shoes. In the minds of those residents who regularly attend committee meetings, the Cinnaminson governing body last week seemed a little less staid, a little less dyed-in-the-wool Republican than it had appeared at previous meetings.
NEWS
May 25, 2016
ISSUE | CIVIL RIGHTS Uncle Sam protects us A letter writer lamented, "We tend to forget that government is involved in our lives from cradle to grave . . . " ("Uncle Sam flexes his muscles yet again," Thursday). No, we don't. We remember that were it not for the government, our food would not be safe to eat and our water would not be safe to drink. Women wouldn't have the right to vote, and workers wouldn't be able to strike legally. Child labor would be the order of the day, and only the rich would be the ones getting an education.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By John Dickerson
It must get confusing in the IT department at the Associated Press: Are you talking about the hackers who hacked our Twitter account or the Justice Department hackers who hacked our phones? Monday, the Associated Press reported that the Justice Department had secretly obtained two months of records of phone conversations by its reporters. Meanwhile, the Washington Post revealed that the IRS's targeting of conservative groups was more widespread than first reported. Someone at the IRS also leaked information about conservative groups to ProPublica.
NEWS
January 8, 2003 | By Steven Thomma INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The federal government - epitomized by a 1950s-style bureaucracy designed for clerks using typewriters - is inadequate to serve and safeguard the country and should be reconstructed, a bipartisan commission said yesterday. Among its recommendations: Cut the number of federal departments and the number of political appointees running them, raise pay for senior career civil servants and federal judges, and make it easier for managers to hire and fire. Authors of the report said the one-two punch of terrorist attacks and economic anxiety underscored the need for an agile and effective government to safeguard everything from food supplies to financial markets.
NEWS
July 5, 2014
What better occasion than Independence Day to reflect on a political movement whose adherents insist its essence is embodied in one of the seminal events of this country's birth, the Boston Tea Party? The spirit of protest is what today's tea-party patriots refer to as they liken themselves to those early Americans who, in 1773, hurled an East India Company cargo into Boston Harbor rather than pay a tax levied by the British Parliament with no colonial representation. With names like the Berks Sons of Liberty, Northeast Pennsylvania Spirit of 1776, Defenders of Freedom, and Tea Party Time Network, today's purported scions of the colonial rebels try to incite the passions of Americans who believe government looms too large in their lives.
NEWS
August 20, 1986 | By Marybeth Farrell, Special to The Inquirer
Tonight, residents of Audubon will count signatures as they rally to beat the clock to change the borough's form of government. Nine residents announced last week that 800 residents had signed a petition seeking to change the borough's form of government from a three-member commission that chooses the mayor to a six-member council with a mayor elected by voters. Under state law, signatures from 1,200 of the 5,638 registered voters are needed by Sept. 4 to place a referendum on the November ballot.
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