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NEWS
June 4, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
TRENTON - The ongoing fight between Rutgers University and New Jersey Senate President Stephen Sweeney flared again Monday as a legislative panel backed his controversial proposal to expand the school's board of governors. The bill would increase from 15 members to 19. Twelve would be political appointees - 10 by the governor, one by the Senate president, and one by the Assembly speaker. The 59-member board of trustees would continue to appoint the seven remaining members of the board of governors.
NEWS
May 13, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
When a former staffer to Gov. Christie appeared last week before the legislative panel probing the George Washington Bridge controversy, her testimony went beyond the question of who ordered the September lane closures. Lawmakers questioning Christina Renna also struck at a broader issue: To what degree had Christie's reelection campaign infiltrated the functions of government? Tuesday's hearing shed light on the inner workings of the governor's Office of Legislative and Intergovernmental Affairs, an outreach office where staffers tasked with assisting mayors also worked last year to secure the mayors' endorsements for Christie's reelection.
NEWS
April 22, 2014
IN A CITY where it's hard to find agreement on anything, we seem to be united in our disgust at the owners of the 100,000 tax-delinquent properties in the city. Coming up a close second is the history of noncollection of those taxes by the city - both forces leading to a dangerous decline of buildings, neighborhoods and values. Turns out that being a tax deadbeat is not the lowest you can go after all. No - that position is reserved for the officials at the Board of Revision of Taxes, who are ever-so-slowly moving their way through property-tax appeals, not because the appeals are complicated but because they don't think they need to work any faster until they get a pay raise.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The 18-story city office building at the foot of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, formerly the headquarters for Bell Telephone Co. of Pennsylvania, will be closed through the weekend as contractors try to repair the building's elevators, damaged by water from a broken pipe. Mayor Nutter said Wednesday that the 1,900 workers assigned to various departments inside the building should check with their supervisors to see if they should report to alternate work locations for essential services Thursday.
SPORTS
April 11, 2014 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
ACCORDING to a Wall Street Journal report about his new book, Memphis coach John Calipari has the metaphor exactly right when he says that the NCAA is like the old Soviet Union in its final days: "It was still powerful. It could still hurt you. But you could see it crumbling, and it was just a matter of time before it either changed or ceased to exist. " This is correct. Here is the proposal: That the NCAA put itself out of business. What would replace it would not be a large umbrella organization but a series of individual sports/sports group organizations.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Last week, thousands of Pennsylvanians who complained that their power prices had jumped unexpectedly this winter - sometimes doubling or tripling their bills - got something all too unusual in today's marketplace: help, if a bit belated, from a government agency. The Public Utility Commission essentially warned the state's competitive electricity suppliers that they won't be able to pull the same stunt next winter, even if their own costs rise more than expected - at least not by burying crucial warnings about potential price spikes in the fine print of customer agreements.
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Columnist
The Shawnee players said the first days of practice under first-year girls' basketball coach Chrissy McGovern were drastically different. And awfully difficult. The team was coming off consecutive Olympic Conference Patriot Division titles and had won a total of 46 games over the previous two years, so McGovern didn't need to reshape everything. But that is exactly what she did. More importantly, she took a program that had enjoyed success to an even higher level. And it all started with buying into her defensive philosophy.
NEWS
March 18, 2014
IT'S LIKE A KID asking the teacher for more homework. When I heard that South Philly auto-body repairman Domenico Nigro wants more oversight and regulation by the city or state, that's what I thought. What business owner wants more government involvement in his or her affairs? The answer: One who cares about the safety of customers and other citizens. People who do heavy repair work on your car are not required to be certified to guarantee their competence. That just floors him. Nigro's wife, Victoria, is a hair stylist and is tested and certified by the state.
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Bonhage McGovern, 95, of Gloucester City, a secretary at St. Joseph's Preparatory School in Philadelphia in the 1970s and 1980s, died on Sunday, March 9, at the Deptford home of a relative. Born in Kensington, Mrs. McGovern graduated from John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' High School in 1936. For a while, she worked at Campbell Soup Co. in Camden. At St. Joseph's, where a relative was an administrator, Mrs. McGovern "worked in one of the offices for donations," daughter Kathleen Reed said.
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