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NEWS
March 16, 2016
By Bruce E. Cain Is American government too open? The short answer is yes in many instances. Determining the right amount of democratic transparency is surprisingly complicated because public officials must govern effectively, not simply in the most democratically pure way. When we make naïve assumptions about citizen capacity, democratic opportunities to observe and participate can be captured by highly motivated and well-resourced interest groups...
NEWS
March 9, 2016
By Neal McCluskey The cost of college is almost certainly too high, and a consequence of that is alarming student debt. Does that mean our goal should be to make college debt free? Depends how you do it. First, let's be clear: While the cost of college is probably much higher than it should be, and millions of people enter but never finish, a degree still tends to pay off handsomely, with the average graduate making far more over her lifetime - some estimate $1 million more - than someone who ended their education after high school.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Airline passengers' complaints to the federal government were up 29.8 percent last year compared with 2014 levels, according to the U.S. Transportation Department's Air Travel Consumer Report, released Thursday. During 2015, the department received 20,170 consumer complaints, up from 15,539 the year before. The bulk of the complaints, 6,433, were about flight cancellations, delays, and misconnections, while 3,133 were baggage problems, the Bureau of Transportation Statistics said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2016 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Nicolai Gogol wrote The Government Inspector long ago (nearly two centuries) and far away (Tzarist Russia). He had decided, he wrote, "to hold everything up to ridicule at once. " Well, social satire doesn't travel well - especially not over time as well as space - so it is puzzling that Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium decided to present this labored farce now and here, especially when there is so much in contemporary society and government that begs to be satirized. The basic plot is that a small provincial town is thrown into a tizzy by a rumor that a government inspector is coming, indeed may have already have arrived in mufti.
NEWS
February 7, 2016 | John Yoo
John Yoo is a law professor at the University of California at Berkeley and a former Justice Department official. He is coeditor of "Liberty's Nemesis: The Unchecked Expansion of the State. " The Obama administration's ongoing scandals over immigration, health care, the Internal Revenue Service, and national security share a common denominator: the inexorable growth of government. If Americans are ever to restore accountability to Washington, they must fundamentally change their approach to the Constitution and executive power.
NEWS
February 6, 2016
By Tom Taft Although it will come as a surprise to many, the NFL is a socialist institution. As the country prepares to watch Super Bowl 50, are there any lessons to be learned from its success? The NFL is essentially run by a central government that has the final word on everything. It's a government determined to compete effectively to maximize its share of available entertainment and advertising dollars, even at the expense of the performance of a given person or group within the system.
NEWS
January 15, 2016
The year is 2016. The scene: a street in West Philadelphia. A local physician is in his car, stopped at a traffic light, when a man with a gun rushes out and begins firing at the car. Miraculously, the doctor is not killed, but he does suffer serious bullet wounds to his left arm and leg. The assailant runs down the street, then tackled by an alert town watch member, who manages to subdue him and call the police. Later, at a news conference, police officials identify the physician at a staff member at a local nonprofit clinic that performs abortions.
NEWS
January 6, 2016 | By Chris Hepp, Claudia Vargas, and Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITERS
With a minimum of tears, a pledge of effective government for all, and a brisk walk up Broad Street, Jim Kenney took charge of Philadelphia on Monday as its 99th mayor. In his inaugural address, the former city councilman promised a government that was "accessible and accountable to the people it serves. " "The vision that will guide my administration," Kenney said, "is that city government should first and foremost deliver efficient, effective services to every single Philadelphian.
NEWS
December 28, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Bruce L. Castor Jr. thrived on locking up criminals, once winning five first-degree murder convictions in a year. He spoke his mind. He fought with fellow Montgomery County commissioners who forged an alliance against him. He had ambitions of becoming governor. Now, Castor's action-packed career in public office is coming to a quiet close. The confident, spotlight-loving, cowboy-boot-wearing Republican lost a race this fall to return to his former position as district attorney.
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