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NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delaware County defense contractor was sentenced to more than three years in prison Friday for bilking the government out of $1.2 million tied to contracts his company received to supply parts for military helicopters. In addition to the prison term, Kenneth Narzikul, 60, of Media, was ordered to pay restitution as well as a $7,500 fine. Narzikul pleaded guilty in August to fraud, obstructing a federal audit, and making false claims after federal authorities accused his company, NP Precision Inc., of collecting partial payments it did not earn on two contracts to manufacture parts for Chinook helicopters.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James A. McGovern, 91, of Lower Gwynedd, a former investigator in the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office, died Friday, Jan. 2, of lung cancer at AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center in Atlantic City. Mr. McGovern served as an investigator for the Philadelphia medical examiner, and later for the Delaware County Medical Examiner's Office. He was called Feb. 26, 1957, when the body of a boy aged 4 to 6 was found in a discarded bassinet carton on Susquehanna Road between Pine and Verree Roads in Fox Chase.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
AL FERGUSON was an exuberant and excitable sports fan. During one of the Flyers' runs for the Stanley Cup in the 1970s, he got so excited watching a game on TV that he leaped up and knocked a tile out of the ceiling. It's not recorded what his wife thought of that mishap, but Al treated it with his usual good humor. "That didn't stop the excitement of the game," his family said. "Instead, it was something to laugh about. " Alfred F. Ferguson, who overcame polio as a child; a lifelong civil servant, holding important positions in state and federal agencies; a devotee of the Jersey Shore and all its delights; and a loyal family man, died Dec. 13 after a long battle with cancer.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Responding to housing-industry concerns that tightened mortgage-credit rules would hamstring the critical first-time-buyer market, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will offer 3 percent down-payment loans to qualified borrowers. Fannie's My Community Mortgage program, open to first-time buyers with a 620 minimum credit score, starts this week. Freddie's Home Possible Advantage, available to all qualified buyers, begins in March. Andrew Bon Salle, a Fannie Mae executive vice president, said his program's goal was to help qualified borrowers gain access to mortgages, but added that it would not "solve all of the challenges around access to credit.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
IT APPEARS more heads will roll - maybe already have - in the porn scandal that has consumed our state government. Renee George Martin, a spokeswoman for state Attorney General Kathleen Kane, yesterday confirmed that her office's human resources department is wrapping up an investigation into at least 30 current employees who used state computers or email accounts to send or receive pornography. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review yesterday reported that "six or more" employees have been fired or offered early retirement.
NEWS
October 22, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
T HE CITY shells out a pretty penny every year to settle lawsuits based on allegations of police misconduct. MuckRock.com, which bills itself as a "collaborative news site" that helps journalists, researchers and citizens analyze and share government documents, posted an online report yesterday that looked at how Philadelphia's annual payouts stack up against those in a handful of other large cities. The findings might not surprise you. The city has shelled out more than $40 million to settle 584 of the 1,223 police-misconduct lawsuits - think wrongful-shooting deaths, excessive force or illegal searches - filed since January 2009, the website reported.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | BY DOYLE MCMANUS
  WHATEVER happened to good old American know-how? The nation that invented modern management seems to be suffering a crisis of competence. The Secret Service can't protect the White House. Public-health authorities can't get their arms around a one-man Ebola outbreak. The army we trained in Iraq collapsed as soon as it was attacked by Islamic extremists, and our own veterans can't get the care they need at Veterans Affairs hospitals. And, lest we forget, it was only a year ago that the White House rolled out its national health insurance program, only to see its website grind to a halt.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Defense lawyers for six Philadelphia narcotics officers accused of robbing and violently attacking drug dealers took aim at the criminal case against their clients Monday, calling it a series of weak allegations built on the testimony of "trashy riffraff" and one rogue officer. They also accused federal prosecutors of omitting key facts in laying out their indictment, including that many of the raids now deemed criminal acts were witnessed by police supervisors and members of other law enforcement agencies.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
With four years separating Medford Township from a fiscal crisis that nearly put it in default, not to mention an embarrassing sex scandal involving its former mayor, town leaders are preparing to host the latest in a series of workshops called the Local Government Institute designed to educate residents about how local government works. Starting in September, elected officials, board members, emergency management leaders, and others will discuss the workings of their boards and agencies in biweekly sessions open to the public.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter's office said Tuesday that it had established six centers where residents will be able to get help applying for a host of government benefits, including food stamps, Medicare, and tax breaks. "Every year, eligible Philadelphia residents leave millions of dollars on the table by not enrolling in critical benefits programs," said Eva Gladstein, who heads the mayor's Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity. In response, the city has established BenePhilly, a program that aims to place counselors trained in benefits at existing social-service agencies, including Project HOME and Catholic Social Services.
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