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NEWS
June 5, 2013
(97% [D] or 98% [R] of vote) Democrat Barbara Buono . . . 165,589 Troy Webster . . . 22,327 Republican *Chris Christie . . . 199,688 Seth Grossman . . . 17,597 *Incumbent
NEWS
March 15, 2012
Governor deserves respect I must heartily disagree with the perspective of the writer of "Governor's behavior shameful" (Tuesday). I wonder if the letter writer heard the exchange between Gov. Christie and William Brown? Brown gave an editorial of his own before asking a question, and when the governor attempted to answer, Brown repeatedly interrupted Christie. Brown was not interested in an answer to his question. He was there to further an agenda and try to shout over any reasonable explanation the governor had to offer.
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The conservative Republican governor and the liberal Democratic senator do not agree. On anything. At all. And they want you to know it. Consider the flurry of news releases from Sen. Frank Lautenberg's office over the last several months eviscerating Gov. Christie for cutting money for women's health, refusing to raise taxes on millionaires, pulling out of a regional greenhouse-gas initiative, and signing a bill that forces public employees to...
NEWS
July 17, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Tom Corbett has been governor for six months, and in many ways, if you agree with his agenda - provided you understand what his agenda is - he's been a success. For the first time in almost a decade, the budget passed on time. Facing a $4 billion gap, he reduced state spending. True to his word, and his signed pledge to Grover Norquist, he didn't raise taxes, although why he feels it necessary to be beholden to a Washington management strategist is beyond me. But Corbett has been terrible - flat-out awful - in meeting with the general public and in communicating his agenda, not only to voters but also to his party brethren.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Matt Katz, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Being governor of New Jersey means you have $30 billion or so to spend each year. It means the Lincoln Tunnel closes when you need to get to New York, a mansion in Princeton is open for parties, and a Shore house at Island Beach State Park is free for your swimming pleasure. And then there's this: You get to appoint six people to the Perfusionists Advisory Committee and nine to the Noise Control Council. The perfusionists (heart-lung machine operators) and the noise-control people (it's an environmental thing)
NEWS
March 12, 2012
Are you in the governor's crosshairs? Does he want to enact policies that you object to? Care to respond? No problem. It'll cost you just $10,875,011. That's what Gov. Christie's chief nemesis, the New Jersey Education Association teachers union, spent last year for "communications" lobbying: an anti-Christie campaign that featured TV ads, radio spots, and a plane that flew up and down the Jersey Shore proclaiming Christie's love for millionaires. The ads are needed, the NJEA says, to counter Christie's free arsenal (his regular national TV interviews, 45-minute news conferences and near-weekly town hall meetings)
NEWS
June 18, 2013
Jim Holshouser, 78, who was North Carolina's first Republican governor of the 20th century, died Monday. In a statement released by Gov. Pat McCrory's office, Mr. Holshouser's family said he had been in declining health. Mr. Holshouser was a state legislator who became North Carolina's youngest governor at 38 when he was swept into office by President Richard Nixon's 1972 electoral landslide. He served a single term. He is remembered for establishing rural health clinics, laying the plan for a criminal justice information system, and reorganizing state government.
NEWS
June 12, 2013
Former Massachusetts Gov. Argeo Paul Cellucci, 65, died Saturday of complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. His death was announced by the University of Massachusetts Medical School, where Mr. Cellucci spearheaded an effort to raise funds for ALS research after publicly revealing his diagnosis in 2011. Mr. Cellucci was elected lieutenant governor in 1990 and became acting governor in 1997 when his predecessor, William Weld, resigned to pursue an ambassadorship.
NEWS
October 20, 1994
Maybe we ought to just let those two bozos duke it out. The winner gets to be governor. We can then forget about the other guy and leave him to the tender ministrations of his cornerman. If the issue is who's the toughest, why the hell isn't Mr. T the governor of some place? This current mud-wrestle for governor of Pennsylvania only demeans the candidates, the voters, the residents and anybody who's flown over on their way to another place. Are the expensive spin doctors Tom Ridge and Mark Singel have hired right that We the People are so damn stupid we think the issue is really which of these two is the nastiest?
NEWS
December 6, 2001 | By Stephen R. Schwartz
If a Mount Rushmore for actors were erected, you'd expect to see the legends etched in stone, right?? Bogart, Tracy, DeNiro,?Brando, Streep. But wait. Don't put that chisel away just yet. DiFrancesco is feverishly working his way toward being included in that exclusive group. DiFrancesco? Sure, you know him - Donald T., the acting governor of New Jersey. Got the gig when the real governor, Christie Whitman, bolted to Washington for a Bush job. He's taking the acting part seriously, too. The acting governor is inescapable, flexing his acting chops by touting the Garden State's attractions in commercials.
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NEWS
August 17, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
GOV. Wolf has quietly appointed a new commissioner to the Delaware River Port Authority following a Daily News story last month that led to the abrupt resignation of Commissioner Whitney White. Wolf spokesman Jeff Sheridan confirmed yesterday that attorney Carl Singley - the former dean of Temple University's law school and onetime close friend of John Street - had been appointed to the DRPA's board on Aug. 4. Unlike Wolf's previous appointments, Singley's was not publicly announced.
NEWS
July 29, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writers
Dashing hopes of a thaw in the frozen state budget talks, Pennsylvania's House speaker said Monday that he would not support taxes "of any kind" without a concession on liquor privatization, and raised the prospect of overriding Gov. Wolf's veto of a Republican spending plan. Rep. Mike Turzai (R., Allegheny) assailed the Democratic governor's proposal to tax natural gas drilling, and insisted Wolf consider his party's plan to raise money by privatizing the state-run wine and liquor stores, which the governor has opposed.
NEWS
July 28, 2015 | John Baer
WHEN AN elected official's chief of staff resigns it's usually a bad thing for the person resigning or the office or the elected official. But last week's resignation of Gov. Wolf's chief of staff, Katie McGinty, is a good thing. Maybe even a trifecta: good for Wolf, good for the stalled state budget and good for McGinty, who seems poised to run for the U.S. Senate. It's good for Wolf because McGinty was an odd fit for chief of staff from the start. She ran against Wolf in the 2014 Democratic primary, so clearly she believed she'd be a better governor.
NEWS
July 25, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf on Thursday named Mary Isenhour, a key aide and Democratic Party veteran, to be his new chief of staff, one day after Katie McGinty resigned for what many observers believe will be a U.S. Senate campaign. A former state Democratic Party leader and political strategist, Isenhour had been Wolf's director of legislative affairs. "She is stepping into some very big shoes," the governor said during a Capitol news conference. But he said she knows how to manage people and has the ability to work with the Republican-controlled legislature.
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Burn, chairman of the Pennsylvania Democratic Party since 2010, said Tuesday that he is resigning and told party leaders they will elect a new chairman when they meet in September. Burn, in a YouTube video e-mailed to state Democratic Committee members, said his decision was driven by the controversy that flared last summer when he refused to step aside to let Tom Wolf, then the Democratic nominee for governor, install his own party leader. That controversy continues to "resonate," said Burn, who raised the possibility of resigning last month when party leaders met in Allentown.
NEWS
July 21, 2015
LET'S TAKE a peek inside Katie McGinty's tug of war. We know there is one. Otherwise she'd simply say, "I am not a candidate for U.S. Senate. " That would end speculation that started in May, after Montco Commissioner Josh Shapiro said he won't run against Republican Pat Toomey next year. So, just the fact that McGinty's not talking shows, as one source close to her put it, she's "seriously, seriously considering. " She needs to make a decision soon because as Gov. Wolf's chief of staff she's a distraction to the many distractions keeping the governor and GOP lawmakers from agreeing on a now three-week-late budget.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Sam Janesch and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - If Gov. Wolf continues to insist on raising taxes as part of any state budget deal, "we're going to be here for a while," a top Republican warned Tuesday. Senate Majority Leader Jake Corman (R., Centre) made the prediction after emerging from a brief closed-door meeting with the governor. He said the Republicans who control the legislature are open to raising new revenue but cannot support Wolf's plan to raise the state's personal income and sales taxes. The governor wants to use a block of that money to pay for a sweeping property tax-relief plan.
NEWS
July 8, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Negotiations resumed Monday between the Wolf administration and the Republican-controlled legislature as they continue to grapple toward a compromise on a new state budget. Gov. Wolf met with the majority leaders of the House and Senate, and members of their staffs met later in the day. But the sides still appear far from a deal, with Wolf publicly insisting that any final spending plan include a significant funding boost for public schools and property tax relief for homeowners.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
LIVINGSTON, N.J. - Even as 1,000 supporters cheered on Gov. Christie as he announced his candidacy for president on Tuesday inside Livingston High School, the scene outside was remarkably different, as hundreds denounced his policies in New Jersey. The duality underscored Christie's polarizing style and demonstrated that even though the Republican governor has earned a reputation for confronting harsh realities with tough solutions, he's also lost the support of a wide swath of New Jersey residents.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Andrew Seidman, and Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writers
LIVINGSTON, N.J. - Gov. Christie launched a bid for the Republican presidential nomination Tuesday, betting that his blunt brand of politics and promise to campaign on big ideas will overcome conservative skepticism and a vulnerable record as the steward of New Jersey's flagging economy. On a stage in the center of the gymnasium of the high school he attended in this North Jersey suburb, Christie - with his wife, Mary Pat, and their four children by his side - invoked lessons taught by his strong-willed mother and his parents' successful efforts to improve their lives, the sort of possibility that Christie argued has waned.
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