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NEWS
January 17, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Former West Virginia Gov. Hulett C. Smith, who signed bills in the 1960s that abolished the state's death penalty and implemented its first strip-mining laws, died Sunday. He was 93. Smith, a Democrat, first ran for governor in 1960, but failed to win his party's nomination. He was elected four years later, at a time when governors were limited to a single term. During his tenure as the state's 27th governor, the Legislature enacted measures to control air and water pollution and to protect human rights.
NEWS
February 22, 2011 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trenton is feeling the calm before the storm right now - and not just because of the snowstorm supposedly lumbering our way. (The guv says you can never trust weather forecasters anyway, because they lack accountability, like teachers.) Tuesday is B-Day - when Gov. Christie drops a budget that is expected to anger Democrats and labor unions while making tea partyers from here to Madison, Wis., smile widely. For a compelling political analysis on the budget, read my colleague Maya Rao's story in Monday's Inquirer.
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | Associated Press
A Philadelphia lawyer and former governor of the U.S. Postal Service is being investigated over claims he tried to influence a real estate deal involving an associate and the post office. The case involving Alan C. Kessler, who left the agency's governing board July 31, has been referred to the chairman of that board by the Postal Inspector General's Office. In question is a Sarasota, Fla., property leased by the Postal Service for use as a post office and vehicle-maintenance facility.
NEWS
August 21, 2013
I suppose Ed Rendell could run for governor. Or Kathleen Kane, despite her denials, could still get in. Or Pat Toomey could switch parties and run against the incumbent Republican. But other than one of those things happening, little could shake up the Democratic race to oppose Tom Corbett more than Jack Wagner getting in. The current field (let's call it "the many") of, I don't know, 17 or so actual or maybe Democratic candidates, all from central or eastern Pennsylvania, must feel a little spine shudder these days.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
I SUPPOSE ED RENDELL could decide to run for governor again. Or Bobby Casey could. Or Kathleen Kane, despite her denials, could still get in. Or Pat Toomey could switch parties and run against the incumbent Republican. But other than one of those things happening, little could shake up the Democratic race to oppose Tom Corbett more than Jack Wagner getting in. The current field (let's call it "the many") of, I don't know, 17 or so actual or maybe Democratic candidates, all from central or eastern Pennsylvania, must feel a little spine shudder these days.
NEWS
February 7, 1989 | By S.A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
A week ago, Al Cozzolino, a retired businessman from Wayne, N.J., who happened to be the father-in-law of former Attorney General Cary Edwards, got up at 6:45 a.m. to work on his car and then run errands for his son-in-law's fledgling campaign for governor. Late that afternoon, Cozzolino - Edwards' 75-year-old mentor and biggest booster - died in an auto accident. Just seven days before Edwards was due to embark on his ultimate career goal - running for governor - his family agonized over whether, and how, to proceed.
NEWS
July 31, 2013 | By Mark Wagenveld, Inquirer Staff Writer
William W. Scranton, 96, the patrician Republican who served as governor of Pennsylvania and sought in 1964 to wrest his party's presidential nomination from Sen. Barry M. Goldwater, died Sunday, July 28, of a cerebral hemorrhage at a retirement community in Montecito, Calif. He was the father of former Lt. Gov. William Scranton 3d and scion of a long line of Scrantons who built a fortune in the Northeastern Pennsylvania city upon which they bestowed their name. Politics for him was an act of service, a duty rather than a passion.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
First of four candidate profiles Rob McCord looked like he'd been dropped into that ubiquitous cellphone commercial, seated in an undersized chair at a too-tiny table in a Philadelphia classroom. But McCord wasn't tossing out inane questions to toddlers. His topic during the visit Wednesday to an early-childhood center near Chinatown was deadly serious: how to keep children - particularly those from struggling families - in school and out of jail. McCord, state treasurer since 2009, was on hand to make his case that if elected governor he would triple the amount the state spends on its youngest students.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
CASUAL observers could be confused by the Democratic race for governor. There's a cabinetmaker who's nice to workers, drives a Jeep, looks like a Midwest college professor and has tons of TV ads. There's a high-energy Irishwoman who was one of like 22 children and lived in a house without a bathroom. There's another guy who was so poor he never got meat so he went to Harvard. And there's the search for Allyson Schwartz. First, some numbers: four candidates, five dropped out, seven weeks to the May 20 primary.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday vacated the bribery conviction of former Virginia Gov. Robert McDonnell with a ruling likely to reverberate through other high-profile corruption cases, including those against former U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.) and U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.) Within minutes of the unanimous opinion's release, lawyers for Fattah - who was convicted last week on federal charges of racketeering, bribery, and fraud, and then resigned from Congress - were scouring the decision, which narrowed the scope of a law that bars public officials from taking gifts in exchange for official actions.
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