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NEWS
May 1, 2014
OK, DEMOCRATIC voters, here's a little heads-up. Your primary to pick a person to pummel Tom Corbett is entering a new phase. It's a phase that you (who believe that Tom Corbett will be pummeled) need to be aware of. For one thing, it's about to get more visible. You'll see more TV ads, polls and final debates. There's a debate focused on education this evening at the Free Library of Philadelphia, 6 to 8 p.m., carried live statewide on the Pennsylvania Cable Network.
NEWS
April 26, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
BRICK, N.J. In yet another community ravaged by Hurricane Sandy, Gov. Christie on Thursday held his 120th town-hall meeting since taking office a little over four years ago, for an audience of nearly 500 people gathered in the gym of an elementary school. And the crowd was mostly friendly - composed mainly of adults over 40 and schoolchildren - who listened for more than 90 minutes to the governor discuss why he holds the forums, how much he loves New Jersey, and a story or two about his late mother.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
First of four candidate profiles Rob McCord looked like he'd been dropped into that ubiquitous cellphone commercial, seated in an undersized chair at a too-tiny table in a Philadelphia classroom. But McCord wasn't tossing out inane questions to toddlers. His topic during the visit Wednesday to an early-childhood center near Chinatown was deadly serious: how to keep children - particularly those from struggling families - in school and out of jail. McCord, state treasurer since 2009, was on hand to make his case that if elected governor he would triple the amount the state spends on its youngest students.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - The Christie administration is proposing a series of "tax policy adjustments" in its next budget to "close loopholes, increase consistency, and support fairness. " But none of them, the Christie administration says, are new taxes or tax increases. Fees and adjustments are favored terms for both parties in modern political discourse. But the tax rhetoric being used by the administration is notable, in part, because the Republican governor repeatedly attacked his Democratic rival in his reelection campaign last year for voting to raise taxes and fees "154 times" in her legislative career.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a move some call unprecedented, Gov. Christie has vetoed a vote of the New Jersey Pinelands Commission, rejecting its decision last month to appropriate funds for possible raises for its employees. Environmental groups quickly denounced the governor's action, asserting that it appeared to be in retaliation for the commission's January rejection of a natural gas pipeline through a protected portion of the pine forest. Christie's office advocated vigorously for the pipeline's approval, but the commission's 7-7 vote killed it. Kevin Roberts, a spokesman for the governor, called the retaliation charges "disconnected from reality," and said Christie had rejected the commission's action because it was fiscally irresponsible and did not follow proper procedure.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
HARRISBURG U.S. Rep. Allyson Y. Schwartz challenged businessman Tom Wolf to disclose details of a $4 million bank loan he obtained for his campaign during a sometimes-tense debate Wednesday among Democratic candidates for governor. "I'm the only one who has not borrowed or given money to myself," Schwartz said, turning to Wolf in a lecture hall at Widener University Law School's Harrisburg campus. "What did you use for collateral? What are the terms? . . . What does it mean to the taxpayer to have a governor paying millions back to a bank?"
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Jerry Iannelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
FAIRFIELD, N.J. - The same few questions appear to be following Gov. Christie from town to town. At the governor's 118th town-hall meeting Wednesday, at Winston Churchill Elementary School in Fairfield, Essex County, those in attendance yet again confronted the governor about his stance on medical marijuana, as well as his decision to veto a bill that would have outlawed pig-gestation crates, a factory farming tool that the Humane Society describes as...
NEWS
April 2, 2014
Returning after a long hiatus to a favorite hobby - berating journalists - Gov. Christie lamented last week that reporters were looking through something he called a "retrospectroscope," using present knowledge to assess the past. But it was the governor himself who seemed to yearn most desperately for such a device, one that would transport him back to the days when he could steamroller critics and campaign for the presidency without being hassled about his administration's orchestration of a traffic jam. Christie's attempted comeback blitz of recent days began with the release of an internal investigation in which the governor tried valiantly to clear himself of the George Washington Bridge scandal at taxpayers' expense.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
CASUAL observers could be confused by the Democratic race for governor. There's a cabinetmaker who's nice to workers, drives a Jeep, looks like a Midwest college professor and has tons of TV ads. There's a high-energy Irishwoman who was one of like 22 children and lived in a house without a bathroom. There's another guy who was so poor he never got meat so he went to Harvard. And there's the search for Allyson Schwartz. First, some numbers: four candidates, five dropped out, seven weeks to the May 20 primary.
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach Jay Paterno, son of the late longtime head coach, said Friday afternoon he was dropping his bid for the Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor. Paterno, who shook up the race on the strength of his name alone, acknowledged that a legal challenge to his nominating petitions was likely to knock him off the ballot or at least tie him up in court. "In talking with attorneys, it has become clear that the ballot challenge could be a long process with potential decisions and appeals carrying beyond Monday's hearing," Paterno said in a statement.
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