IN THE NEWS

Gps

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
One Sunday earlier this year, Jean Celestin was taking his daughters to a party in West Deptford Township. On the front seat of his green Volvo was a wrapped birthday present. Behind him, Justine, 8, and Jeanelle, 3, were in child seats. At the wheel, Celestin, a U.S. citizen who was born in Haiti and now lives in Swedesboro, was glued to his GPS. Big mistake. Instead of taking him to the Delaware River's edge for the party, he said, it led him into the riverside complex of Solvay Solexis, an international chemical company, on a parallel road.
NEWS
February 19, 2010 | By Kathleen Brady Shea and Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A Philadelphia man attracted lots of ambulance chasers yesterday - law enforcers, not lawyers - and they got an assist from technology. Police received a report about 8:30 a.m. that an ambulance had been stolen from a kidney dialysis center in the 5900 block of North Broad Street in North Philadelphia. Cory E. Chambers, 26, helped himself to a vehicle that was parked outside the facility with the engine running, police said. He then began a circuitous, rush-hour joyride around the city - but Philadelphia police were able to track his every move.
NEWS
January 30, 2001 | By Dave Barry
I'm a big fan of technology. Most guys are. This is why all important inventions were invented by guys. For example, millions of years ago, there was no such thing as the wheel. One day, some primitive guys were watching their wives drag a dead mastodon to the food-preparation area. It was exhausting work; the guys were getting tired just WATCHING. Then they noticed some large, smooth, rounded boulders, and they had an idea: They could sit on the boulders and watch! This was the first in a series of breakthroughs that ultimately led to television.
NEWS
February 14, 2016
Valentine's Day and cars go together like peanut butter and jelly, like the Dowager Countess and wisecracks, like horsepower and torque. It's the first time I've been so honored to have Driver's Seat fall on this special day, creating an opportunity to tackle the notions of romance and cars. To that end, here are some useful - if in some cases fictional - questions from folks driven crazy by driving. Dear Car Guy: What one option should I make sure I have in my car to keep my marriage intact?
NEWS
July 17, 2010
I KNOW WIVES think their husbands don't listen to them, and to an extent, wives are right. Sure, we smile and nod when they boss us around. But in reality, while our wives are going on about taking out the garbage, we're thinking about football season, the All-Star game or cheeseburgers. It's not like we do it purposely. Many of the things wives say to us are things we need to hear. It's just that when our wives speak to us in that high-pitched, do-it-now-or-else tone, they remind us of our mothers.
NEWS
June 2, 2006
I would like to clarify exactly why Philadelphia taxi drivers are opposed to the installation of GPS systems. The adverse effects of this contract are far reaching, and not limited to drivers. Longstanding customers will not be able to be serviced with any certainty or regularity due to drivers being forced to accept unwanted calls while en route. Once a fare is picked up, the driver will have to follow a computer-generated route, regardless of traffic, construction, etc. As for driver safety, it is absurd to let a computer randomly dispatch calls to the city's 1,600 cabs.
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
Michael Lacy is no Geomuggle or novice, and he's determined to make sure a new generation of geocachers populates the Jersey Shore. Geocaching is something of a video-game update on the road-rally concept. In this case, people or groups hide things in "caches," often identifying the sites in coordinates that can be discovered by Global Positioning Systems (GPS). Inside each cache is usually some small prize, but the fun is primarily just finding the site of the cache and recording, on a scorecard within what is usually a small box, that you were there.
NEWS
July 9, 2011
Suspicious spouses in New Jersey can use GPS tracking to determine if their loved ones have strayed. An appeals court ruled Thursday that placing the device in a family vehicle does not constitute invasion of privacy. Gloucester County Sheriff's Officer Kenneth Villanova sued private investigator Richard Leonard, who was hired by Villanova's now-ex-wife in 2007. The court said Leonard had recommended she buy the tracking device after her husband had thwarted efforts to tail him. - AP
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Mari Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Family, friends, and complete strangers have joined in the search for a missing Delaware County teen, combing the region on foot, by car, and in the air, their movements tracked electronically to ensure no spot is missed. More than 200 volunteers showed up at Episcopal Academy on Saturday as the search for Cayman Naib, 13, of Newtown Square, entered a third day. The Civil Air Patrol joined in the effort and the FBI was analyzing the youth's cellphone and computer to see whether he had contacted anyone before disappearing.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2005 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the Schuylkill Expressway slows to a crawl, difficult decisions arise: Sit there? Or is it early enough in the jam to take an alternative like Ridge Pike? Or is Ridge already clogged? Two men leaving Center City for a meeting 23 miles away in Wayne a week or so ago faced that decision. One stayed on the expressway and got lucky. The jam cleared sooner than expected, and he got there in an hour. The other took Ridge and arrived in 90 minutes. Alain L. Kornhauser, a longtime professor of operations research and financial engineering at Princeton University, says he can help.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 13, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
Uh oh, Father's Day is nigh. He might say "don't get me anything. " You don't have to listen. Déjà vu (all over again). Does Dad or Grandpop talk fondly of holding a transistor radio to his ear to listen to the ball game or Top 40 hits? Even if he doesn't, he'll get a kick from the CC Skywave from C. Crane, a more advanced example of the species. It tunes AM, FM, shortwave, weather, and air traffic bands, with favorites easily stored on the array of 10 preset buttons. With alarm clock functionality, it's apt for travelers.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
The week I got my driver's license, my parents rushed out of town to a funeral. "You can use the car, but don't go far," warned Dad on his way out the door. "Whatever you do, don't cross the bridge. " Meaning, I shouldn't go visit my teenage crush Ruth and buddy Jake, who'd introduced us, in remote Cherry Hill. Of course, I did that anyway, and got away with it. But probably wouldn't today, I realized last week, while cruising across the same Ben Franklin Bridge in a new 2016 Chevrolet Malibu equipped with Teen Driver tech.
NEWS
February 14, 2016
Valentine's Day and cars go together like peanut butter and jelly, like the Dowager Countess and wisecracks, like horsepower and torque. It's the first time I've been so honored to have Driver's Seat fall on this special day, creating an opportunity to tackle the notions of romance and cars. To that end, here are some useful - if in some cases fictional - questions from folks driven crazy by driving. Dear Car Guy: What one option should I make sure I have in my car to keep my marriage intact?
TRAVEL
February 1, 2016
S everal readers have contacted us about the viability of taking a road trip overseas. Despite a love of hitting the open road in America, their fear of the unknown makes them reluctant to drive in a foreign land. We've taken independent road trips on five continents, including a memorable journey in Africa. Getting off the well-worn tourist path is often the best way to experience local culture. A car provides the mobility to discover a country and its people. A few simple tips help ensure your foreign road trip is safe and enjoyable: Rent from a reputable agency.
TRAVEL
October 19, 2015 | By Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Staff Writer
ATHENS, Greece - I am a paper guy, always have been. I read this newspaper in its paper version, the dead-tree form you can hold in your hand, fold, use to swat flies, clean glass, and line birdcages. I work for the other newspaper in town. I am a paper guy. Similarly, I've always liked, and used, paper maps. I know how to perfectly fold them. Not bragging, just saying. I love their look, their feel, their smell. Still - it's a new age, the machines have arisen. There are new ways.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
After killing his wife, Kyle Crosby marked two locations on a GPS device where he considered dumping her body, naming one "Maybe" and the other "Idk" for "I don't know," authorities say. Ultimately, they say, he decided on a spot near the two: A wooded area on farmland in Sykesville, Md., where he left the body of his wife, Erica Crippen, wrapped in a blanket beneath a pile of branches. The Mount Laurel woman's body lay there for more than two months, the tattoo on her chest and the cesarean scar from one of her two childbirths preserved beneath the cold and snow of winter.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Mari Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Family, friends, and complete strangers have joined in the search for a missing Delaware County teen, combing the region on foot, by car, and in the air, their movements tracked electronically to ensure no spot is missed. More than 200 volunteers showed up at Episcopal Academy on Saturday as the search for Cayman Naib, 13, of Newtown Square, entered a third day. The Civil Air Patrol joined in the effort and the FBI was analyzing the youth's cellphone and computer to see whether he had contacted anyone before disappearing.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
One Sunday earlier this year, Jean Celestin was taking his daughters to a party in West Deptford Township. On the front seat of his green Volvo was a wrapped birthday present. Behind him, Justine, 8, and Jeanelle, 3, were in child seats. At the wheel, Celestin, a U.S. citizen who was born in Haiti and now lives in Swedesboro, was glued to his GPS. Big mistake. Instead of taking him to the Delaware River's edge for the party, he said, it led him into the riverside complex of Solvay Solexis, an international chemical company, on a parallel road.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
"GREAT THINGS in small packages" is a consumer tech mantra, with makers compacting ever more features into ever smaller designs. This goal is being applied to upscale compact cars in the U.S. market, with the 2015 Audi A3 4-door as an apt case in point. BY THE NUMBERS: Jazzing up big sister A4's staid looks, nicely outfitted at $29,900 (plus delivery) and laden with extraordinary tech features and options (pushing a fully loaded ride to 44 large), the A3 has generations X and Y and millennials in its sights.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
JENNIFER SERRANO knows how backward Pennsylvania's laws protecting domestic violence victims can be. She's been fighting off her abuser at home and in court for 10 years now. Like the times she'd hand-delivered stay-away orders with a police escort - only to be attacked by her ex after the police officers drove away. Or the other times her ex would stand outside her workplace and call 50 to 60 times to berate her on the phone. She'd call the cops, only to watch them shrug, saying he wasn't violating his restraining order because he wasn't physically abusing her. In 2007, she grew so desperate to escape the torment that when she saw a "How can we help you?"
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|